Tag Archives: spam

Warning – PDRM Parking Fine Scam Alert!

Scammers are targeting motorists with the PDRM parking fine scam! Make sure you warn your family and friends!

Here is what you need to know about the PDRM parking fine scam!

 

PDRM Parking Fine Scam Email

People are getting emails warning them that they just committed a parking violation, while offering them a cheap fine if they pay quickly.

Fines Inquiry and Payment

Dear recipient,

We are writing to draw your attention to a recent traffic violation in Malaysian jurisdiction.

Our traffic enforcement staff have observed your vehicle parked in a no-parking zone. This contravenes section (no. 2016-691] of the Road Traffic Act.

The fine is set at MYR 50. Payment of the fine is required within 7 days of the date of notification, to avoid further legal consequences.

If the fine is not paid within the time limit, you may be subject to legal action, resulting in an increase in the original fine.

Payment deadline: [08/26/2023]

Methods of payment accepted:

Cordially,

Malaysian Police Department

Recommended : Bantuan Tunai Rakyat Malaysia 2023 Scam Alert!

 

PDRM Parking Fine Email Is A Scam!

These PDRM parking fine emails are scam emails. This was confirmed by PDRM itself.

On 7 August 2023, the Cyber Crime division of the Royal Malaysia Police (PDRM) posted an alert warning motorists not to fall for the MyBayar scam.

These emails are designed to scare its victims into action. Hence, it offers a very cheap way to quickly “settle the problem”. However, if you take a breath, and analyse the email CAREFULLY, you will see many problems with it.

  • Letter is from PDRM : The Royal Malaysia Police (PDRM) will never write to you by email.
  • Letter is in English : The Royal Malaysia Police (PDRM) will never write to you in English.
  • Typo in the name : The fake email used My Bayar PDRM, instead of MyBayar PDRM.
  • Lack of name and personal details : The fake email refers generically to “Dear recipient“, without listing your full name and MyKad number.
  • Lack of vehicle details : The fake email doesn’t mention the vehicle make and plate number.
  • Lack of location details : The fake email does not mention where the offence occurred, or even when it occurred.
  • Fine is much too low : PDRM traffic fines are never as low as RM50. The cheapest fine is RM150 for Category 4 offences, but you can pay as low as RM70 within 15 days.
  • No such law : The fake email refers to the Road Traffic Act. There is no such act in Malaysia. The proper name is the Road Transport Act 1987 (Act 333).
  • No such section : If you look at the Malaysia Road Transport Act 1987 (PDF download), you will see that there is no such thing as Section 2016-691.

The email appears to be from My Bayar PDRM (typo in the name), but if you inspect the email address, you will see that it was sent by “in-to-no-reply@silverbackgames.xxx” or “hello@sooqr.com” or some other email address.

Obviously, this email did not originate from an official PDRM email address! This should immediately tell you that this is a fake or scam email!

Recommended : How A University Student Lost RM22K In Online Job Scam!

If you click on the Pay My Fine link in the scam email, you will be taken to a fake My Bayar PDRM website (with the same typo in the name).

You may notice that you now have 7 days to pay the RM 50 fine, instead of just 5 days in the email. Odd, isn’t it?

Also odd is the fact that the page does not mention your name, your MyKad number, your vehicle type and model, or even its plate number! The page also doesn’t mention where the offence took place, or the time you were caught committing said offence.

Do NOT proceed after this point… This is a scam website!

But if you have itchy fingers, and click on the Pay The Fine button, you will be asked to pay for the RM50 fine using your debit or credit card.

Needless to say, PLEASE DO NOT SUBMIT YOUR DEBIT / CREDIT CARD DETAILS!!!

If you provide these scammers with your debit / credit card details and TAC / OTP numbers, they will be able to charge ANY AMOUNT they want to your credit card, or withdraw ANY AMOUNT they want from your bank account!

Recommended : Wedding Invitation Scam : Don’t Install APK File!

It’s even worse if you are asked to log into your bank account to pay the fine. DO NOT DO THAT!

If you provide them with your bank login and password, as well as OTP/TAC number, these scammers will be able to transfer money out of your bank account!

Please note – this is a scam! This is a phishing attack to gain access to your credit card and/or bank account.

Regardless of how you get any notification from PDRM about any traffic offence you may have committed, you should always check the status through these official MyBayar PDRM options:

Please SHARE this warning with your family and friends!

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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PDRM Warning : Watch Out For MyBayar Scam!

PDRM is warning motorists not to fall for the MyBayar scam! Here is what you need to know about the MyBayar PDRM scam!

 

PDRM Warning : Watch Out For MyBayar Scam

On 7 August 2023, the Cyber Crime division of the Royal Malaysia Police (PDRM) posted an alert warning motorists not to fall for the MyBayar scam.

The MyBayar PDRM scam starts with an official-looking email that warns motorists that they have been caught contravening the law, and offers a cheap RM50 fine if paid within 5 days:

Last notice of contravention before prosecution

Dear recipient,

We are writing to draw your attention to a recent traffic violation in Malaysian jurisdiction.

Our traffic enforcement staff have observed your vehicle parked in a no-parking zone. This contravenes section (no. 2016-691] of the Road Traffic Act.

As a result of this infringement, a fine of MYR 50 has been imposed. This fine must be paid within 5 days of the date of this notification to avoid further legal consequences.

Failure to pay the fine within the allotted time may result in legal proceedings being taken against you, which could lead to increased fines, penalties and the possible suspension of your driving license.

Recommended : Bantuan Tunai Rakyat Malaysia 2023 Scam Alert!

 

MyBayar PDRM Scam : How Does It Work?!

Many people who received the MyBayar PDRM email might be shocked to find out that they were caught committing a traffic violation, and then relieved that it was only RM50 if they paid quickly.

That’s how the scammers trap their victims – by offering a cheap RM50 fine, when we all know that fines for traffic offences are at least RM150, and can go all the way up to RM1,000!

Those who received this fake MyBayar PDRM email would be tempted to quickly pay the cheap RM50 fine, before it becomes a lot more expensive!

But if you take a closer look at the email, you will spot some problems with it:

  • Weird English : The email title of “Last notice of contravention before prosecution” is nonsensical.
  • Typo in the name : The fake email used My Bayar PDRM, instead of MyBayar PDRM.
  • Lack of name and personal details : The fake email refers generically to “Dear recipient“, without listing your full name and MyKad number.
  • Lack of vehicle details : The fake email doesn’t mention the vehicle make and plate number.
  • Lack of location details : The fake email does not mention where the offence occurred, or even when it occurred.
  • Fine is much too low : PDRM traffic fines are never as low as RM50. The cheapest fine is RM150 for Category 4 offences, but you can pay as low as RM70 within 15 days.
  • No such law : The fake email refers to the Road Traffic Act. There is no such act in Malaysia. The proper name is the Road Transport Act 1987 (Act 333).
  • No such section : If you look at the Malaysia Road Transport Act 1987 (PDF download), you will see that there is no such thing as Section 2016-691.

The email appears to be from My Bayar PDRM (typo in the name), but if you inspect the email address, you will see that it was sent by “in-to-no-reply@silverbackgames.xxx” or “hello@sooqr.com” or some other email address.

Obviously, this email did not originate from an official PDRM email address! This should immediately tell you that this is a fake or scam email!

Recommended : How A University Student Lost RM22K In Online Job Scam!

If you click on the Pay My Fine link in the scam email, you will be taken to a fake My Bayar PDRM website (with the same typo in the name).

You may notice that you now have 7 days to pay the RM 50 fine, instead of just 5 days in the email. Odd, isn’t it?

Also odd is the fact that the page does not mention your name, your MyKad number, your vehicle type and model, or even its plate number! The page also doesn’t mention where the offence took place, or the time you were caught committing said offence.

Do NOT proceed after this point… This is a scam website!

But if you have itchy fingers, and click on the Pay The Fine button, you will be asked to pay for the RM50 fine using your debit or credit card.

Needless to say, PLEASE DO NOT SUBMIT YOUR DEBIT / CREDIT CARD DETAILS!!!

If you provide these scammers with your debit / credit card details and TAC / OTP numbers, they will be able to charge ANY AMOUNT they want to your credit card, or withdraw ANY AMOUNT they want from your bank account!

Recommended : Wedding Invitation Scam : Don’t Install APK File!

It’s even worse if you are asked to log into your bank account to pay the fine. DO NOT DO THAT!

If you provide them with your bank login and password, as well as OTP/TAC number, these scammers will be able to transfer money out of your bank account!

Please note – this is a scam! This is a phishing attack to gain access to your credit card and/or bank account.

Regardless of how you get any notification from PDRM about any traffic offence you may have committed, you should always check the status through these official MyBayar PDRM options:

Please SHARE this warning with your family and friends!

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Please support us by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or donating to our fund. Thank you!

COVID-19 Email Scams + Malware Are Spreading!

As the COVID-19 coronavirus spreads across the world, so are COVID-19 email scams and malware!

Tatyana Shcherbakova tells us what she and her team discovered!

 

Warning : COVID-19 Email Scams Are Spreading!

As the COVID-19 coronavirus spreads, fake information is being created and distributed at a very high rate, confusing people all over the world.

Cybercriminals are taking advantage of the confusion, creating various email scams, with some realistic ones pretending to be from the WHO.

Tatyana Shcherbakova, a senior web content analyst, details how her team looked at the COVID-19 email scams, and came across the realistic ones from WHO…

 

WHO Is Warning You? These Are COVID-19 Email Scams!

At first, we found emails offering products such as masks, and then the topic became more commonly used in Nigerian spam emails. We also found scam emails with phishing links and malicious attachments.

One of the latest spam campaigns mimics the World Health Organization (WHO), showing how cybercriminals recognize and are capitalizing on the important role WHO has in providing trustworthy information about the coronavirus.

Users receive emails allegedly from WHO, which supposedly offer information about safety measures to be taken to avoid a COVID-19 infection.

Once a user clicks on the link embedded in the email, they are redirected to a phishing website and prompted to share personal information, which ends up in the hands of cybercriminals.

This scam looks more realistic than other examples we have seen lately, such as alleged donations from the World Bank or IMF for anyone who needs a loan.

In order to stay safe, we advise users to carefully study the content of the emails they receive and only trust reliable sources.

If you are promised a vaccine for the virus or some magic protective measures, or content of the email is making you worried, it has most likely come from cybercriminals.

This is especially true if the sender suggests clicking on a link and sharing your personal data or opening an attachment.

You should not donate any real money or trust information with promises to help those affected by the virus, even if the email comes from someone who introduces themselves as an employee of a trusted organization.

Finally, double check the email address, as scammers often use free email services or addresses that have no relation to the organization mentioned.

 

Malware Masked As COVID-19 Coronavirus Documents!

They also found malicious files disguised as documents related to the COVID-19 coronavirus. The malicious files were masked under the guise of pdf, mp4 and docx files about the COVID-19 coronavirus.

The names of files imply that they contain video instructions on how to protect yourself from the virus, updates on the threat and even virus detection procedures, which is not actually the case.

In fact, these files contained a range of threats, from Trojans to worms, which are capable of destroying, blocking, modifying or copying data, as well as interfering with the operation of computers or computer networks.

Some malicious files are spread via email. For example, an Excel file distributed via email under the guise of a list of coronavirus victims allegedly sent from the World Health Organization (WHO) was in fact a Trojan-Downloader, which secretly downloads and installs another malicious file.

This second file was a Trojan-Spy designed to gather various data, including passwords, from the infected device and send it to the attacker.

 

COVID-19 Email Scams + Malware : How To Avoid

As governments and businesses are forced by the COVID-19 coronavirus to encourage their employees to work from home, it is critical that they employ these cybersecurity practices to reduce risk of falling for phishing attacks, or malware :

  • Provide a VPN for staff to connect securely to the corporate network
  • All corporate devices – including mobiles and laptops – should be protected with security software
  • The operating system and apps should be updated with the latest patches
  • Restrict the access rights of people connecting to the corporate network
  • Ensure that the staff are aware of the dangers of unsolicited messages

 

Recommended Reading

Go Back To > Cybersecurity | Business | Home

 

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Kaspersky Travel Scam Alert + Advisory For The Holidays!

Kaspersky Lab just issued a travel scam alert and advisory for this holiday season. Pay attention, so you will enjoy a great holiday!

 

Travel Scam Operations On The Rise!

Kaspersky Lab researchers have uncovered several travel scam operations last month, seeking to trick holiday-goers looking for great bargains.

Fraudsters Are Phishing For Unwary Victims

There were more than 8,000 phishing attacks, disguised as offers from popular lodging platforms. In fact, 7,917 of those phishing attacks specifically targeted people looking for Airbnb rentals.

In one example, fraudsters created a phishing page that look like an Airbnb page, and pretended to offer cheap city-centre rentals with high review scores. Once the victim confirmed and paid for the booking, both the fraudsters and the offer disappeared.

Spam Is Still Effective!

In just one day, the researchers detected 7 different fake email blasts that are very convincingly disguised as offers from popular booking platforms for airline tickets and accommodation.

Three of those spam emails actually offered FREE FLIGHTS in return for the completion of a short online survey, and sharing the link with other people. After answering just three questions, victims were asked to enter their phone numbers, which were then used to subscribe to paid mobile services.

 

Travel Scam Methods

Spam and phishing attacks were amongst the most effective attack vectors. They use social engineering to manipulate and exploit human behaviour.

Fake Websites

These travel scam operations are often very sophisticated, using fake sites that are almost identical to the legitimate websites.

They, therefore, easily trick unwary victims into handing over their credit card details, or pay for a product or service that does not exist.

Mobile Booking Risk

More people are booking their flights and accommodations on a mobile device, which makes it harder to spot fake links. This makes mobile users particularly vulnerable to both spam and phishing attacks.

 

Kaspersky Travel Scam Advisory

To avoid these travel scams, Kaspersky Lab recommends taking these security measures :

  • If an offer seems too good to be true, it probably is. AVOID IT!
  • CHECK the link in the browser’s address bar before you key in sensitive information like your login and password.
    If it is misspelled (e.g. airbnb.com.room.online), or does not match the page you are visiting (like this example below), or uses special symbols instead of letters, don’t key in any information. CLOSE THE PAGE!

An Expedia page with a Booking.com address??? Something’s NOT right…

  • Book your stay and tickets only with trusted providers.
    Make sure you are on their actual websites by typing in their address in the browser’s address bar.
  • NEVER click on links that come from an unverified source, whether it’s in an email, an instant message or through social networks.
  • Use a security solution with behaviour-based anti-phishing technologies like Kaspersky Security Cloud, or Kaspersky Total Security, which will warn you if you get tricked into visiting a phishing web page.

 

Recommended Reading

Go Back To > Cybersecurity | Home

 

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If you like our work, you can help support our work by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!


Sophos: Is Your Network Protected Against Botnets?

Is Your Network Protected Against Botnets?

Having been in the threat marketplace for several years, botnets are still successful today as it provides a powerful cloud computing network for hackers to spread malware and spam.

Like any other malware, botnets are introduced to the computer network through email attachments, websites and USB sticks. As the user accesses these files or compromised websites, malware from the botnets begin to spread and exploit vulnerabilities on the system.

In a recent research on global spam by SophosLabs, it was found that the global volume of spam dropped by more than half just before Christmas and continued to stay at around the same level, believed to be due to the notorious Necurs botnet going quiet.

However, an old-school type of scam was seen to have resurfaced just last month with huge success. Known as pump-and-dump, the scam inflated the stock price of Incapta, a media holding company, encouraging the public to buy into the scam, thus pumping up the stock further.

How does a stock scam work?

Hackers pick a cheap stock, concoct a believable story to talk it up, such as claiming the company is undergoing an acquisition. The hackers then buy the stocks to increase its stocks price and email unsuspecting victims encouraging them to buy shares in that company. The unsuspecting victims are influenced by the dramatic rise in the company’s stock price and are enticed into buying the shares, falling prey to stock fraud.

The impact of botnets

Botnets can have a devastating impact on organisations, particularly if the objective is to steal sensitive information. If the botnet is not after company data, it could be using the organisation’s devices and network resources to cause harm to another organization; likely a partner company by spreading malware to their network too.

Once the botnet has a foothold in your organisation, it will typically call home to the hacker’s command and control (C&C) server to register its success and request further instructions. It may be told to lie low and wait, attempt to move laterally on the network to infect other devices, or participate in an attack. This attempt to call-home presents an ideal opportunity to detect infected systems on your network that are part of a botnet, but it requires the right technology to be effective.

Unfortunately, other than the call home communications, a bot on your network may be extremely difficult to detect. In most cases, the infected device will continue to operate normally or perhaps experience a slow-down in performance that could be easily dismissed or attributed to other factors.

And this why a next-generation firewall is the first line of defense against botnets.

Best practices in protecting against botnets

Advanced Threat Protection (ATP): ATP can identify botnets already operating on your network. Ensure your firewall has malicious traffic detection, botnet detection, and command and control (C&C) call-home traffic detection. The firewall should use a multi-layered approach to identify call-home traffic and immediately identify not only the infected host, but the user and process. Ideally, it should also block or isolate the infected system until it can be investigated.

Intrusion prevention system (IPS): IPS can detect hackers attempting to breach your network resources. Ensure your firewall has a next-gen IPS that’s capable of identifying advanced attack patterns on your network traffic to detect hacking attempts and malware moving laterally across your network segments. Also consider blocking entire Geo IP ranges for regions of the world you don’t do business with to further reduce your surface area of attack.

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Sandboxing: Sandboxing can easily catch the latest evasive malware before it gets onto your computers. Ensure your firewall offers advanced sandboxing that can identify suspicious web or email files and detonate them in a safe sandbox environment to determine their behaviour before allowing them into your network.

Web and email protection: Effective web and email protection can prevent botnet-recruiting malware from getting onto your network in the first place. Ensure your firewall has behavioural-based web protection that can actually emulate or simulate JavaScript code in web content to determine intent and behaviour before it’s passed to the browser. It is also important to ensure your firewall or email-filtering solution has top-shelf anti-spam and antivirus technology which helps detect the latest malware in email attachments.

Web Application Firewall (WAF): A web application firewall can protect your servers, devices and business applications from being hacked. Ensure your firewall offers WAF protection for any system on your network that requires remote access from the Internet. A web application firewall will provide a reverse proxy, offload authentication, and harden systems from being hacked.

 

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Malicious Spam Emails Spike In Q1 2016

16 May 2016 – The latest Kaspersky Lab Spam and Phishing Report has discovered that although the quantity of spam emails has been decreasing, they have become more criminalized. At the same time, the level of malicious mailshots has dramatically increased – Kaspersky Lab products prevented 22,890,956 attempts to infect users via emails with malicious attachments in March 2016, twice the number of attempts reported in February 2016.

Since 2012 the level of spam in email traffic has constantly been decreasing. However, the quantity of emails with malicious attachments has increased significantly – in Q1 2016 it was 3.3 times higher than during the same period in 2015. There was also a growing amount of ransomware reported throughout the quarter. This is often propagated through emails with infected attachments – for example Word documents. The main actor on this field in Q1 was the ransomware Trojan Locky, which has been actively distributed via emails in different languages and has targeted at least 114 countries. Locky emails have contained fake information from financial institutions that have deceived users and forced them to open the harmful attachment.

Kaspersky Lab’s findings suggest that spam is becoming more popular for fraudsters to target Internet users, because web browsing is becoming safer. Almost all popular web-browser developers have now implemented security and anti-phishing protection tools, making it harder for cybercriminals to propagate their malware through infected web pages.

According to Kaspersky Lab’s Q1 report on spam and phishing the main findings for the quarter were:

  • In Q1 2016 Kaspersky Lab registered 56.3% of spam in email flow. This is 2.9 percent lower compared to the same period in 2015, when it equaled 59.2%.
  • The largest amount of spam was sent in January (59.6% in overall email traffic). This is explained by the end of the holiday season, when the flow of normal, non-spam, emails is usually low.
  • The USA retained its position as the biggest source of spam, sending 12.43% of unwanted emails. The share of the USA in this rating is slightly decreasing in comparison to Q1 2015, when it was 14.5%.
  • Other large sources of spam included Vietnam (second place with 10.3%) and India (6.16%). This is compared to the same period in 2015, when the second and third places were held by Russia (7.3%) and Ukraine (5.6%). Russia moved to seventh place this quarter with 4.9%.
  • 81.9% of spam emails in Q1 2016 were very small size – up to 2 KB, a 2.8 percentage point increase in comparison to the same quarter in 2015. For spammers, smaller emails are easier to handle in mass mailings.
  • Germany was the country most targeted by malicious mailshots, with a total share of 18.9% of Kaspersky Lab product users in the country targeted this way. Germany was followed by China (9.43%) and Brazil took third place (7.35%). For the same period in 2015, the top three countries were Great Britain (7.8%), Brazil (7.4%) and the USA (7.2%).
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Terrorism became the main topic of spam emails in Q1.

During this quarter fraudsters tried to lure users into opening malicious files, gaining their attention with emails about terrorism, a subject which is always in the news. To prevent terrorist attacks many countries have strengthened their security measures and this has therefore become a popular topic for spam emails.

Some spam fraudsters tried to convince recipients that the file attached to their spam email contained a new mobile application, which, after installation, could detect an explosive terrorist device. The email emphasized that the US Department of Defense had discovered this technology and that it was sufficiently simple and accessible. The attachment usually contained an executive file, which was detected as Trojan-Dropper.Win32.Dapato, malware that can steal personal user information, organize DDoS-attacks and install other malicious software.

Well-known Nigerian spammers also used terrorist topics in their emails. According to the Kaspersky Lab report, the quantity of these emails has increased considerably. These spammers previously preferred to send long emails with a detailed story, and links to news to make it more convincing. However, they are now only sending short messages with no detail, asking the recipients to get in touch.

“Unfortunately we are seeing our previous predictions about the criminalization of spam coming true. Fraudsters are using diverse methods to attract user attention, and to make them drop their guard. Spammers are employing a diversity of languages, social engineering methods, different types of malicious attachments, as well as the partial personalization of email text to look more convincing. The fake messages often imitate notifications from well-known organizations and services. This is raising spam to a new dangerous level.” – warns Daria Gudkova, Spam Analysis Expert, Kaspersky Lab.

 

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