Tag Archives: SMS

Did Oprah Winfrey Just Die Suddenly In Hospital?!

Did Oprah Winfrey just die suddenly in the hospital from a dangerous disease, or after committing suicide in her living room?!

Take a look at the viral claims, and find out what the facts really are!

 

Claim : Oprah Winfrey Just Died Suddenly In Hospital!

A multitude of videos are claiming that Oprah Winfrey just died suddenly in the hospital. One even claimed that she committed suicide in her living room!

Breaking News: American media proprietor Oprah Winfrey was found dead on her residence right after committing suicide on her living room

RIP…Oprah Winfrey’s Tears Of Grief: ‘She Passed Away Today And My Life Will Never…

RIP…Oprah Winfrey Left Fans In Tears & Devastating, She Died Suddenly and Tragically…

Oprah Winfrey Is Dead. Last Video a week Before Death. RIP Legend

5 minutes ago/ We report extremely sad news about TV Queen Oprah Winfrey, Sad details.

Prayers Up: Oprah Winfrey Is Currently On Her Death Bed And Family Asking For Prayers

Prayers Up, Oprah Winfrey Is Currently On Life Support After Diagnosed With Dangerous Disease.

Sad News Oprah Winfrey Tearfully Begged For Help As She Is Fighting For Her Life In ICU

Prayers Up: Oprah Winfrey Rushed To Hospital In Critical Condition After Suffering From This

Officially! funeral of Oprah Winfrey confirmed / 30 minutes ago

Recommended : Is Madonna Fighting For Her Life From Vaccine Injury?!

 

Truth : Oprah Winfrey Did Not Die Suddenly In A Hospital!

This is yet another example of FAKE NEWS circulating on social media, and YouTube, and here are the reasons why…

Fact #1 : Oprah Winfrey Is Still Alive + Well!

Oprah Winfrey (born Orpah Gail Winfrey on January 29, 1954) is still very much alive and well, as of July 12, 2023.

That was when she posted on Facebook about the fourth episode of “The Covenant of Water: The Podcast” with Abraham Verghese!

A day earlier – on July 11, she posted a video of herself speaking about her Love & Happiness Journal.

To be clear – Oprah Winfrey was not hospitalised for any serious disease. She did not commit suicide, or die in the hospital. She is still alive and well!

Fact #2 : No Legitimate Media Reported Her Death

These YouTube videos have been circulating for weeks and months, but people don’t seem to notice that no legitimate media has reported Oprah Winfrey’s death or suicide.

Oprah Winfrey is the “Queen of All Media” and one of the most influential woman in the world. If anything happened to her – even if she just fell down, it would have been worldwide news.

Yet, no legitimate media outlet reported that Oprah was hospitalised or died suddenly in a hospital from any cause. Only a bunch of small-time YouTube channels?!

That’s because it never happened. Oprah Winfrey is still alive, period.

Fact #3 : Scammers Using Fake Oprah Winfrey Death Video

Scammers were found to use a fake video claiming that Oprah Winfrey committed suicide to trick people into installing malware.

The “shocking video” was found to be linked to a fake Fox News Facebook app that, when installed, will request for permission to access the user’s basic information, and post on their behalf.

You should NEVER install any app to view any video, and you should certainly not allow any app to post on your behalf!

Note that scammers may send you the scam links via text messages. Even though telcos have now banned links in SMS messages, scammers can send you similar messages via WhatsApp or Telegram.

Recommended : Did Simon Cowell Just Die In A Car Accident?!

Fact #4 : Oprah Winfrey Death Hoax Is Driven By Fake Fact Check Too

This Oprah Winfrey death hoax, ironically, is also being driven by another fake fact check article by MediaMass Project.

News of television host Oprah Winfrey’s death spread quickly earlier this week causing concern among fans across the world. However the July 2023 report has now been confirmed as a complete hoax and just the latest in a string of fake celebrity death reports. Thankfully, the former host of ‘The Oprah Winfrey Show’ is alive and well.

Their claim of a viral R.I.P. Oprah Winfrey Facebook page is false. There is no such Facebook page. It is their standard fake excuse for writing about fake celebrity deaths.

The statement from Oprah Winfrey’s unnamed reps confirming that she is not dead is exactly the same as statements from other celebrities whose reps MediaMass claimed were victims of death hoaxes, like Taylor Swift, Bruce Willis, Celine Dion, Morgan Freeman, Simon Cowell, Madonna, Cristiano Ronaldo, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Robert Pattinson, Justin Bieber, Harrison Ford, Sylvester StalloneTom Hanks, Toby Keith, Lucy Liu, Clint Eastwood, Dolly Parton, and Melanie Laurent.

She joins the long list of celebrities who have been victimized by this hoax. He’s still alive and well, stop believing what you see on the Internet.

Hidden in the description page for the MediaMass Project is a disclaimer that they are a “satire” website. That’s the usual “cover” for websites peddling fake news.

Regardless of their reasons, anything posted by MediaMass.net must be considered as fake news, until proven otherwise.

Recommended : Did Elton John Ban US Over Anti-Grooming Laws?!

Fact #5 : This Is Just Fake Celebrity News

This is yet another example of fake celebrity news circulating on social media and fake news websites, just like these examples:

Please help us FIGHT FAKE NEWS by sharing this fact check article out, and please SUPPORT our work!

 

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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Malaysia To Ban SMS With Personal Details!

Telcos in Malaysia will soon ban SMS messages with personal information, as part of the MCMC’s initiative to prevent scams! Here is what you need to know!

 

Malaysia To Ban SMS With Personal Details!

On Sunday, 2 July 2023, four Malaysian telcos – Maxis, Celcom, Digital and U Mobile will ban SMS messages containing personal information , as part of the MCMC’s initiative to prevent scams.

In addition to the May ban of SMS links, both local and international users will be prevented from sending any SMS message containing:

  • personal details
  • mobile or fixed line phone number
  • banking details like account number
  • MyKad number

All SMS messages containing these forbidden items will not be blocked, but their senders won’t be charged for those blocked messages.

Read more : Malaysian Telcos Ban SMS Links To Prevent Scams!

 

No Ban For SMS With Personal Details Via Short Codes

It should be noted that this ban on SMS messages with personal details do NOT apply to businesses using legitimate Enterprise short codes. They will still be allowed to issue SMS messages with URLs (links), phone numbers, and personal details.

Here are the current Enterprise short codes for Celcom and DIGI, from which you “may” continue to receive SMS messages with hyperlinks (URLs) and personal information.

Telco Enterprise Short Codes
Celcom CelcomDigi / EASYRELOAD
Celcom / CELCOM
2000 / 2901 / 20000 / 78888
28888 / 28882 / 22288 / 28282 / 22888
2001 / 22002 / 22009 / 21888 / 22022 /
22033 / 22162 / 22244 / 22262 / 22990 /
23000 / 23222 / 23777 / 25000 / 25555 /
26664 / 26668 / 26674 / 26680 / 26699 /
27100 / 27200 / 27999 / 28000 / 29888 /
29992 / 29999 / 39131 / 39140 / 39146 /
39170 / 39172 / 39230 / 39231 / 39240 /
39254 / 39258 / 39281 / 39291 / 39442 /
39466 / 39470 / 39471 / 39496 / 39504 /
39505 / 39506 / 39509 / 39513 / 39514 /
39515 / 39518 / 39881 / 39437 / 39132 /
39133 / 39144 / 39162 / 39177 / 39498 /
39502 / 39511 / 39512 / 39495
Digi CelcomDigi / Digi / DigiRewards
200 / 2901 / 2691 / 5001 / 27676
20000 / 21000 / 28879 / 28888 /
28882 / 22288 / 28282 / 22888

Maxis has 5-digit short codes like 1XXXX, 2XXXX, and 6XXXX, but has chosen to block SMS messages containing personal information from their Enterprise short codes:

In order to prevent individuals from becoming online scam scams, the Malaysia Communication and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) has issued a directive to all telcos on 14 February 2023 to block sending and receiving of short messaging service (SMS) from local, international mobile numbers and applications containing below contents:

  • URL link and any clickable link e.g. shorten URL; shorten URL;
  • Request for user’s personal information e.g name, IC number, account number and
  • Mobile and fixed line number

Blockings are being implemented in stages; started from 2 May 2023 for SMS between individuals; the next and last stage is the blocking of SMS containing the above 3 elements from mobile and applications such as Enterprise SMS service and Maxis IoT SIM from 2 July 2023.

Recommended : Scam Alert : Watch Out For Telegram Phishing Attack!

 

Risky SMS Ban Helpful, But Other Platforms Still A Risk

While this measure is really helpful in reducing scams, the ban is limited to SMS messages. It does not prevent scammers from sending similar scam messages through instant messaging platforms like WhatsApp, Telegram, Facebook Messenger, WeChat, etc.

I should also point out that links are not inherently bad. Links in messages, even SMS messages, are mostly safe.

Perfectly Fine

  • Clicking on a link to read an article / terms and conditions of a promotion
  • Clicking on a link to enrol in a promotion which does not require you to log into any website
  • Clicking on a link to check in for a flight, or get a travel update

However, they can be used to send you to a phishing website which is designed to look like a genuine bank / payment website. Hence, it is critical that you should NEVER log into any website through a link.

NEVER DO THIS

  • Clicking on a link to log into a bank website
  • Clicking on a link to make a purchase or payment
  • Clicking on a link to log into any account / email

Phishing attacks work by tricking you into going into a fake website that looks like the real website. But you still have to log into the fake website to give the scammers your login details.

If you click on a link, and you are asked to login – this is likely a phishing attack. But don’t worry – as long as you refuse to log into any website after clicking on a link, the phishing attack fails.

 

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Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Malaysian Telcos Ban SMS Links To Prevent Scams!

Malaysian telcos have started banning SMS links, as part of the MCMC’s initiative to prevent scams! Here is what you need to know!

 

Malaysian Telcos Ban SMS Links To Prevent Scams!

On Tuesday, 2 May 2023, four Malaysian telcos – Maxis, Celcom, Digital and U Mobile started banning SMS links, as part of the MCMC’s initiative to prevent scams.

From this day onwards, users will be blocked from sending or receiving SMS with a link. MCMC had earlier issued the directive to all telcos on February 14, 2023, but the ban on SMS links is only now being implemented.

The ban on SMS links is currently not mandatory for all telcos, and is being implemented in phases. Currently, the ban is limited to SMS between individuals.

Businesses using short codes like 6XXXX, 2XXXX and 1XXXX will eventually be banned from including a URL link in their SMS messages. They will be given time to switch to other methods to send promotional messages with links to their customers.

The MCMC has issued a directive to all telcos to block sending and receiving of SMS with URL link. The objective is to prevent users from becoming victims of online scams

MCMC issued the directive to all service providers on Feb 14 and is currently assessing the progress. For now, the block is still not mandatory.

The blocking of person-to-person SMS with URL links will take effect from 2 May 2023. For SMS sent by business via short codes such as 6XXXX, 2XXXX and 1XXXX, this will be done later and specific notification to business users will be sent.

Malaysia Deputy Communications and Digital Minister Teo Nie Ching said in February 2023 that blocking such SMS links will ensure that people won’t click on them and possibly end up as a scam victim.

Recommended : Scam Alert : Watch Out For Telegram Phishing Attack!

 

Only SMS Links Banned, Links Via Other Platforms Still A Risk

While this measure is really helpful in reducing scams, the ban is limited to SMS links. Scammers can still send links through instant messaging platforms like WhatsApp, Telegram, Facebook Messenger, WeChat, etc.

That does not mean that links are inherently bad. Links in messages, even SMS messages, are mostly safe.

Perfectly Fine

  • Clicking on a link to read an article / terms and conditions of a promotion
  • Clicking on a link to enrol in a promotion which does not require you to log into any website
  • Clicking on a link to check in for a flight, or get a travel update

However, they can be used to send you to a phishing website which is designed to look like a genuine bank / payment website. Hence, it is critical that you should NEVER log into any website through a link.

NEVER DO THIS

  • Clicking on a link to log into a bank website
  • Clicking on a link to make a purchase or payment
  • Clicking on a link to log into any account / email

Phishing attacks work by tricking you into going into a fake website that looks like the real website. But you still have to log into the fake website to give the scammers your login details.

If you click on a link, and you are asked to login – this is likely a phishing attack. But don’t worry – as long as you refuse to log into any website after clicking on a link, the phishing attack fails.

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Is There A RM300 Seat Belt Fine On PLUS Highway?!

Is it true that rear passengers caught not wearing a seat belt on the PLUS North-South Expressway will receive a RM300 fine?

Find out what’s going on, and what the FACTS really are!

 

Claim : RM300 Seat Belt Fine By Police On PLUS Highway!

These viral messages have been circulating on SMS, WhatsApp and Facebook since early January 2021, but keep getting reposted every holiday season.

🙏. INFORMATION🙏

The North-South Expressway PLUS starts today, and police officers will check every day in the evening~ The passengers in the back seat with no seat belt, will be fined RM300 per person, RM600 for two people.

👉 Please do update friends & family members to be alert & pay attention in this matter.
👉 Just now a lot of cars have been issued with fines.
👉 Please notify everyone going out to remember to wear a seat belt at the back seat.

Just received and send.

南北高速 PLUS 今天开工,警察每天晚上都会检查~后排座位上的乘客没有系安全带,将被罚款。每人 300 令吉,两个人 RM600“.

👉请及时通知亲朋好友,提醒他们注意此事。
👉刚才很多车都被罚款了。
👉请通知所有外出的旅客在后座系好安全带。

The North-South Expressway PLUS starting today, PDRM will check vehicles~ Passengers in the rear seats who are not wearing seat belts will be fined. RM300 per person, RM600 for two persons.

 

The Truth : There Is No RM300 Seat Belt Fine

The truth is there is no RM300 fine for rear passengers who are caught not wearing a seat belt.

Fact #1 : JSPT Refuted RM300 Seat Belt Fine Claim

The Bukit Aman Traffic Investigation and Enforcement Department (JSPT) refuted the claim that they would be checking cars travelling on the PLUS North-South Expressway in the evenings, and issuing a RM300 fine for those caught not wearing a seat belt at the back.

The JSPT Deputy Director SAC Datuk Mohd Nadzri Hussain said, “We at JSPT would like to advise all road users to continue complying with the laws and regulations to ensure the safety of every road user.

In addition, we would also like to urge the public to stop spreading fake information and to always ensure the validity of any viral information shared on social media sites.

Fact #2 : Rear Seat Belt Mandatory Since 1 January 2009

It has been mandatory in Malaysia to wear a seat belt while seated in the back seat of a vehicle since 1 January 2009, except for :

  • old vehicles registered before 1 January 1995
  • vehicles registered on or after 1 January 1995, but lack rear anchorage points
  • vehicles that seat more than 8 passengers (not including driver)
  • good vehicles with carrying load of more than 3.5 tonnes

Fact #3 : Seat Belt Fine Is Way More Than RM300

Any driver or passengers, whether seated in the front or rear, caught not wearing a seat belt will be subject to :

  • a fine of up to RM 2,000, and / or
  • a prison sentence of up to 1 year

As you can see – that’s a LOT higher than the RM300 fine in the viral messages.

Fact #4 : RM300 Seat Belt Fine “Offer” Ended In 2009

The RM300 seat belt fine was actually a discounted offer for a 6-month introductory period when the seat belt law came into effect.

From 1 January until 30 June 2009 – the police and JPJ only issued a reduced RM300 fine to those who were caught no wearing a seat belt.

That “introductory fine” had long expired, so drivers are now subject to the much higher penalties.

Please help us fight fake news – SHARE this fact check with your family and friends, and SUPPORT our work!

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Watch Out For TNG eWallet SMS Phishing Scam!

In this article, we will show you many types of TNG eWallet SMS phasing scam, so you can avoid them!

 

Watch Out For TNG eWallet SMS Phishing Scam!

People are getting these SMS messages that appear to be from TNG eWallet, but are really just phishing scams!

RMO TNG eWallet: Bantuan e-dompet kepada golongan B40&M40 RM1000 akan dikreditkan ke dalam TNG eWallet anda. Kemaskini maklumat dan semakan status di www.tngewalletbantuangov.com

RMO T’n GO Your account function has been closed. You need to confirm the device immediately. Follow my.tngwallc.com

RMO TNG Wallet: Permohonan GOpinjam anda telah diluluskan, RM3000 telah kredit ke TNG Wallet anda. Sila semak baki dan tuntutan anda di http://logtouchngo.cc

RMO GOV: Terima kasih atas sokongan anda dari kerajaan BN. Bantuan e-dompet kepada rakyat Malaysia berjumlah RM500 telah kredit ke TNG Wallet anda. Sila sahkan identiti dan semak baki anda di https://touchngoemy.top/

 

How TNG eWallet SMS Phishing Scam Works!

The many examples of the TNG eWallet phishing scam employ SMS spoofing technology to send you SMS messages that appear to be from the TNG eWallet team.

What most people don’t know is that – the TNG eWallet team will never send you any SMS messages to :

  • offer you money from government or other agencies
  • inform you that money has been credited to your eWallet
  • ask you to log into your eWallet account using a link
  • ask you to update your account information using a link

The TNG eWallet team warned users against clicking on any links sent by SMS, even if they appear to be genuine. Genuine TNG eWallet SMS messages will never have a link attached.

These links do not lead to the real TNG eWallet website (https://www.touchngo.com.my/), but use similar-looking fake domains, like:

tngewalletbantuangov.com
my.tngwallc.com
logtouchngo.cc
touchngoemy.top
ewallettouchng.top
touchngosign.com
touchngolog.top
logintouchngo.cc
touchngo.life
touchngologin.cc
my.touchngo.com
my.touchwalf.com
my.touchwalp.com
my.tngowalle.com
my.tngowallet.com
tngwallet.top

If you see such domains, you should be alert that you are being targeted by a phishing scam. NEVER CLICK ON A LINK in any TNG eWallet SMS.

If you click on any of these links, you will be taken to a page that looks like a genuine TNG eWallet login page, but is really a phishing scam page.

If you key in your login details, as well as your phone number and One-Time Password (OTP), the scammers will have full access to your eWallet, and can freely transfer out your eWallet balance.

As many of us link our credit cards to the TNG eWallet, the scammers can also reload your eWallet using those credit cards, and transfer the money out.

So make sure you IGNORE any SMS message that asks you to click on a link, even if it appears to be from TNG eWallet.

Please help to fight financial scams, by SHARING this article with your family and friends!

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Are MySejahtera 68808 SMS Messages A Scam?!

Are MySejahtera messages sent through the 68808 SMS service really a scam?!

Take a look at the viral claim, and find out what the facts really are!

 

Claim : MySejahtera 68808 SMS Messages Are A Scam!

People are sharing this warning on social media – Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, as well as in WhatsApp and Telegram groups :

MySejahtera 通过 68808 发送短信要求用户 重置资料,请不要点击链接,这是钓鱼陷阱 骗局。
请转发广传出去给大家警惕,谢谢。

MySejahtera sending sms through 68808 to ask users to reset, pls do not click link. It’s a scam.

 

MySejahtera 68808 SMS Messages Not Necessarily A Scam!

Many Malaysians are rightfully wary about clicking on links sent by SMS or WhatsApp.

There have been many scams involving fake SMS or WhatsApp messages, which we covered here in Tech ARP :

However, Malaysians are also too gullible, accepting all warnings on WhatsApp as genuine, without first verifying if they are even true.

Here are the reasons why the MySejahtera reset messages delivered by the 68808 SMS service are not necessarily a scam!

Fact #1 : 68808 Is Used By MySejahtera

Despite what people may tell you – 68808 is an official SMS service number used by MySejahtera.

In fact, MySejahtera uses three SMS service numbers to send you notifications (like your vaccination appointments), as well as your password renewal link :

68808
68088
63001

Fact #2 : 68808 Messages Are Generally Legitimate

Despite what is shared on social media, messages sent through 68808 are genuine. What you need to be wary of are SMS messages sent via other numbers.

Take a look at this example of fake news shared on social media, and some websites. It was touted as an example of fake MySejahtera messages sent by 68808.

The truth is “original” message was sent through 63839, which is not a legitimate MySejahtera SMS service. The “fake” message was sent through 68808, which is a legitimate MySejahtera SMS service.

In this misleading example, you can also see a prior SMS message on vehicle servicing in the 63839 channel. Official MySejahtera SMS channels (68808, 68088 and 63001) will only show messages from MySejahtera, not other services.

Note : The links in both messages appear to be genuine, linking to https://mysejahtera.malaysia.gov.my/.

Fact #3 : MySejahtera Sends Reset Links Via SMS

Despite what social media “experts” may tell you – MySejahtera will send password reset links through SMS, as a verification method.

If you are trying to reset your MySejahtera password (because you forgot it), you will be sent an SMS message with a link to https://mysejahtera.malaysia.gov.my/, as the example above shows.

Fact #4 : SMS Messages Can Be Spoofed

That said, SMS messages can be spoofed to appear to come from the three legitimate MySejahtera channels – 68808, 68088 and 63001.

So you should avoid clicking on MySejahtera password reset links, even from legitimate channels, unless you have specifically asked to reset the MySejahtera password.

Fact #5 : MySejahtera Team Clarified This In April

The MySejahtera team actually refuted these false claims in April 2022. Unfortunately, people still continue to share this fake news.

So please help us fight fake news – share this fact check with your family and friends!

 

How To Avoid MySejahtera (Or Other) SMS Scam!

So here is what I recommend when it comes to SMS messages, whether they were sent by MySejahtera, banks, etc. :

  1. Always check to make sure they come from legitimate SMS channels. For MySejahtera, that’s 68808, 68088 and 63001.
  2. If you are not sure about an SMS message from the authorities / banks / telcos, please do not hesitate to call them to verify the authenticity of that message.
  3. Never click on a link to log into a website (like your bank). Always use your banking app, or log in manually using a Internet browser on your computer or phone.
  4. Only click on a link in specific circumstances that do not require a login – for example : to verify your request to reset your MySejahtera password.
  5. Do NOT click on any link to confirm that you are resetting a password, or confirm your new SIM card, unless you just requested to performed those actions.
  6. Before you click on a link, always check the link goes to the official website (like https://mysejahtera.malaysia.gov.my/). Never click on a link that goes to suspicious websites.

I hope this article helps you differentiate between fake claims circulating on social media and WhatsApp groups, and proper cybersecurity measures we should take to prevent being scammed of our hard-earned money!

Please help to SHARE this fact check article out, and please SUPPORT our work! Thank you!

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Verified : KKM + MySejahtera SMS Messages Are Legit!

Are scammers sending fake SMS messages from KKM and MySejahtera to scam you out of your money?

Take a look at the viral post, and find out what the FACTS really are!

 

Claim : KKM + MySejahtera SMS Messages Are Fake!

People have been sharing a screenshot of two SMS messages from KKM (Malaysia Ministry of Health) and MySejahtera, claiming that they are scam messages.

RM0 MySejahtera: You are COVID-19 positive. Kindly refresh your MySejahtera Profile and click to declare your close contact: https://bit.ly/3jNvOqL

RM0 KKM Anda adlh COVID19 positif & masih belum menjawab status kesihatan hari ini. Segera lengkapkan H.A.T. di MySejahtera. Rujuk https://bit.ly/2VMaWrC

This is a scam. If receive don’t click. Please inform all ur family members and friends ….NETIZEN WATCHDOG

Many also include a link to the Kuan Evening Edition video to prove that these messages are indeed fake messages used by scammers in “phishing attacks”.

 

Truth : KKM + MySejahtera SMS Messages Are Legit!

The SMS messages in the screenshot are legit, and came from KKM and MySejahtera.

The truth is that viral message is FAKE NEWS, and here are the facts…

Fact #1 : The MySejahtera SMS Message Is Legitimate

The MySejahtera SMS message in English is legitimate. It warns you that you have tested positive for COVID-19.

You are therefore required to declare your close contacts in the MySejahtera app or website.

The link – https://bit.ly/3jNvOqL – leads to the Close Contact reporting page in the MySejahtera website (https://mysejahtera.malaysia.gov.my/help/closecontact/).

Fact #2 : The KKM Telephone Number Is Genuine

On 24 September 2021, KKM confirmed that the 03-2703-3000 telephone number is genuine.

The Malaysia Ministry of Health uses that telephone number to call those identified as COVID-19 positive to fill up their Home Assessment Tool (HAT) in the MySejahtera app.

Fact #3 : The KKM SMS Message Is Legitimate

The KKM SMS message in Bahasa Malaysia is also legitimate.

It is a reminder that you did not fill in your Home Assessment Tool (HAT) in the MySejahtera app today.

Those who are under home quarantine must complete that home assessment test every day.

The Ministry of Health may issue a compound if you fail to perform the home assessment test, as required.

The link in the SMS – https://bit.ly/2VMaWrC – actually leads to a PDF infographic on the Home Assessment Tool (HAT) – https://www.infosihat.gov.my/images/media_sihat/poster/pdf/DiManakahHAT.pdf

The infographic explains who needs to perform self-monitoring using the HAT feature, and how to do it in the MySejahtera app.

Now that you know the truth, please SHARE this fact check, so your family and friends won’t be fooled by the fake news!

It is critical that everyone understands that these alerts are genuine, and take them seriously!

 

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Scam Alert : CIMB Customers Hit By Fake SMS Messages!

Scammers continue to target CIMB customers, using many different kinds of fake SMS messages.

Do NOT click or call if you receive any of these fake SMS messages!

And please warn your family and friends!

 

Scam Alert : CIMB Customers Hit By Fake SMS Messages!

Whether you are a CIMB Bank customer or not, you may receive one of these alarming SMS messages :

RM 0.00 CIMB: Confidential!

Dear CIMB users, your account will TERMINATED on 24/12/20. Verify via http://www.cimbclickikm.cc to keep on using CIMB Clicks services.

Please make verification within 24hours to avoid service interruption.

RM0 CIMB: Instant Transfer RM4998.78 to CHAY LEE FEN/HONG LEONG on 23-Dec-2020, 13:06:35. Call the no. at the back of your card for queries.

If you receive any of these SMS messages, please DO NOT click on the link, or call the number. JUST IGNORE THEM, or delete them.

RM0.00 CIMB: MYR 2968.00 was charged on your card num 4204 at Shopee.MY. If this is not your txn, call 1800-9767 now.

Cimb Your account is judged as high risk by the system, PLS re-verify your account. cimbclicksecurity.com

Note : These scams do not just affect CIMB Bank. In fact, all banks are affected :

 

Why These CIMB SMS Messages Are Fake

Let us show you how to identify these fake CIMB SMS messages.

If you spot any of these warning signs, BACK OFF and DO NOT PROCEED!

Warning Sign #1 : Grammatical Mistakes

If you carefully read the first SMS messages above, you can easily spot numerous grammatical mistakes. A bank will never send such poorly worded messages to their customers.

However, they may copy the real SMS message from CIMB to trick you into thinking that this is a real transaction. Such fake SMS messages will have proper grammar.

Warning Sign #2 : Embedded Links

Banks will NEVER embed links (URLs) into the message. If you see embedded links, always think – SCAM SMS!

Unlike the Public Bank SMS scam, they used a copy of the real SMS message to trick you into clicking the URL in the first message.

Warning Sign #3 : Wrong Links

And always check the link – www.cimbclickikm.cc and cimbclicksecurity.com are not the correct addresses for the CIMB Bank websites (www.cimbclicks.com.my or www.cimb.com.my).

The best policy is to manually key in the bank website address. NEVER click on any link in an SMS, even if it looks legit.

When you see any website with .cc links, be wary because the .CC domains are registered in the Cocos (Keeling) Islands – an Australian territory of only 14 km², with only about 600 inhabitants.

Warning Sign #4 : No Personal Login Phrase / Picture

To avoid phishing attacks, banks now give you a secret response (like a picture or a phrase) to confirm that you are visiting their legitimate website.

If the website you are visiting gives you the wrong picture or secret phrase, you have been tricked into visiting a fake website designed to mimic the real bank website.

You should also remember that the bank website must show you secret picture or phrase right after you enter your login, but BEFORE you key in your password.

If you are asked to key in your password without the website displaying the secret phrase or picture, you have been tricked into visiting a fake website designed to mimic the real bank website.

 

CIMB Advice To Protect Against Fake SMS / Email Scams

Here is a list of DOs and DON’Ts to protect yourself against fake SMS / email scams.

Please DO follow these good practices

  1. Pay attention to your transaction alerts and check your account activities regularly. In case of any unusual activity, please contact us immediately.
  2. If you wish to contact us, ONLY call the number on the back of your card or refer to CIMB website “Contact Us” page.
  3. Always check the URL of the website that you are making purchases from. Ensure  the “lock” icon or “https” appears on the website’s address bar.
  4. Always find a reputable seller on online marketplaces by searching for reviews from other customers to know their experience.
  5. To access CIMB Clicks, type the entire URL as follows: www.cimbclicks.com.my
  6. Always remember to log out once you have completed your banking transactions.

Please DO NOT follow these bad practices

  1. Don’t panic and give personal information to fraudsters impersonating representatives of government agencies etc. even if they deploy fear tactics. Immediately call the number on the back of your card to verify with CIMB.
  2. Never apply for personal financing through unverified links or individuals promising a lower rate. CIMB does not impose any application charges for personal financing applications.
  3. Never take instructions from anyone to change the mobile number in CIMB records to any number other than your own mobile number.
  4. When transacting online, never continue with a purchase if you have any doubts if the seller is not genuine.
  5. Never share details such as your card number / User ID / PIN / password / TAC  with anyone or key them in in any website other than CIMB Clicks.
    (Note: CIMB will never ask for  your ‘User ID’, ‘Password’ or ‘TAC’ under any circumstances outside of CIMB Clicks).
  6. Do not click on links or open email attachments from unknown / unreliable senders / sources.
    (Note: Emails from CIMB will always end with @cimb.com such as cimb.marketing@cimb.com

 

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Scam Warning : Public Bank Customers Hit By Fake SMS!

Scammers continue to target Public Bank customers, using many different kinds of fake SMS messages.

Do NOT click or call if you receive any of these fake SMS messages!

 

Public Bank : Fake SMS Scam Warning! Do NOT Click / Call!

Whether you are a Public Bank customer or not, you may receive one of these alarming SMS messages.

Please DO NOT click on the link, or call the number. JUST IGNORE THEM, or delete them.

The safest thing to do is NEVER CLICK ON A LINK in any SMS. If you need to log into your bank account, key in the website address manually.

RM0 PBB/PIBB: Your PBB account will TERMINATED on 02Dec20 01:30:00 AM. Please make verification via http://www.mypbebank.cc to avoid service interruption. Verify now keep on using PBB services.

RM0 Credit Cash out RM3,000 form card ending no 7102 successful on 01 DEC. Information system sending. Call PBB 1800-81-9566 for any query

Warning: Your account is marked as insecure, please click Return PAC immediately to confirm that it is safe to use. (https://pbevip.vip/)

PBe Your account is in a high-risk state PLS log in immediately and return the PAC to protect your account security https://www.pbebanks.top

PBe Warning: Phishing URLs are frequent recently, PLS log in immediately to strengthen account security. 2Mar21 13:14 https://se1.pbevip.top/

PB e Your account is in a high-risk by the system, PLS re-verify your account https://pbbanks.red/ <security reminder is normal>

RM0 PIBB: Thank you for using your card ending 1098@senQ MYR 2899, Pls call 03-56260232 now, if you didn’t use it

RM0 PBB/PIBB: Trx amt MYR2699.00  @LAZADA for card ending 5738. Call PB 1-800-81-2337 now if didn t perform.

PBB: Your account is judged as high risk by the system. PLS re-verify your account https://www.pbebanks.asia/ <security reminder is normal>

PB e Alarm Your banking Suit now is marked as insecure, PLS re-verify your account https://online-pbebank.com <security reminder is normal>

 

Public Bank Fake SMS Scam : What Happens If You Click?

Clicking on the links will often lead you to a phishing website, a fake website designed to look like a Public Bank website.

You will be asked to key in your personal information, including your Public Bank user name and password. DO NOT KEY IN YOUR INFORMATION!

But if you are free and want to help screw these scammers, key in fake information as many times as possible.

Note : These scams do not just affect Public Bank. In fact, all banks are affected :

 

Public Bank : How To Identify Fake SMS Messages

With a little help from Public Bank, let’s show you how to identify fake SMS messages.

If you spot any of these warning signs, BACK OFF and DO NOT PROCEED!

Warning Sign #1 : Grammatical Mistakes

Read the two SMS messages above, and you can easily spot numerous grammatical mistakes. A bank will never send such poorly worded messages to their customers.

Warning Sign #2 : Embedded Links

Banks will NEVER embed links (URLs) into the message. If you see embedded links, always think – SCAM SMS!

Warning Sign #3 : Wrong Links

And always check the link – www.mypbebank.cc is not the correct address for the Public Bank website (www.pbebank.com)

When you see any website with .cc links, be wary because the .CC domains are registered in the Cocos Islands – an Australian territory of only 14 km², with only about 600 inhabitants.

The same goes for generic, top level domains like .TOP, .VIP, .TOP, .RED.ASIA, etc.

Warning Sign #4 : No Personal Login Phrase / Picture

To avoid phishing attacks, banks now give you a secret response (like a picture or a phrase) to confirm that you are visiting their legitimate website.

If the website you are visiting gives you the wrong picture or secret phrase, you have been tricked into visiting a fake website designed to mimic the real bank website.

You should also remember that the bank website must show you secret picture or phrase right after you enter your login, but BEFORE you key in your password.

If you are asked to key in your password without the website displaying the secret phrase or picture, you have been tricked into visiting a fake website designed to mimic the real bank website.

 

Recommended Reading

Go Back To > Cybersecurity | BusinessHome

 

Support Tech ARP!

If you like our work, you can help support us by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!