Tag Archives: SMS

Fact Check : RM300 Seat Belt Fine On PLUS Highway?

Fact Check : RM300 Seat Belt Fine On PLUS Highway?

Is it true that rear passengers caught not wearing a seat belt on the PLUS North-South Expressway will receive a RM300 fine?

Find out what’s going on, and what the FACTS really are!

 

Claim : RM300 Seat Belt Fine By Police On PLUS Highway!

This is the viral message that has been circulating on SMS, WhatsApp and Facebook since early January 2021, but keeps getting reposted every holiday season.

🙏. INFORMATION🙏

The North-South Expressway PLUS starts today, and police officers will check every day in the evening~ The passengers in the back seat with no seat belt, will be fined RM300 per person, RM600 for two people”.

👉 Please do update friends & family members to be alert & pay attention in this matter.
👉 Just now a lot of cars have been issued with fines.
👉 Please notify everyone going out to remember to wear a seat belt at the back seat.

The Truth : There Is No RM300 Seat Belt Fine

The truth is there is no RM300 fine for rear passengers who did not wear a seat belt.

Fact #1 : JSPT Refuted The Viral Claim

The Bukit Aman Traffic Investigation and Enforcement Department (JSPT) refuted the claim that they would be checking cars travelling on the PLUS North-South Expressway in the evenings, and issuing a RM300 fine for those caught not wearing a seat belt at the back.

The JSPT Deputy Director SAC Datuk Mohd Nadzri Hussain said, “We at JSPT would like to advise all road users to continue complying with the laws and regulations to ensure the safety of every road user.

In addition, we would also like to urge the public to stop spreading fake information and to always ensure the validity of any viral information shared on social media sites.

Fact #2 : Rear Seat Belt Mandatory Since 1 January 2009

It has been mandatory in Malaysia to wear a seat belt while seated in the back seat of a vehicle since 1 January 2009, except for :

  • old vehicles registered before 1 January 1995
  • vehicles registered on or after 1 January 1995 but lack rear anchorage points
  • vehicles that seat more than 8 passengers (not including driver)
  • good vehicles with carrying load of more than 3.5 tonnes

Fact #3 : Seat Belt Fine Is Way More Than RM300

Any driver or passengers, whether seated in the front or rear, caught not wearing a seat belt will be subject to :

  • a fine of up to RM 2,000, and / or
  • a prison sentence of up to 1 year

Fact #4 : RM300 Seat Belt Fine Ended In June 2009

For a 6 month period – from 1 January until 30 June 2009 – the police and JPJ only issued a reduced RM300 fine to those who did not wear a seat belt.

That “introductory fine” had long expired.

 

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Name : Adrian Wong
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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Verified : KKM + MySejahtera SMS Messages Are Legit!

Are scammers sending fake SMS messages from KKM and MySejahtera to scam you out of your money?

Take a look at the viral post, and find out what the FACTS really are!

 

Claim : KKM + MySejahtera SMS Messages Are Fake!

People have been sharing a screenshot of two SMS messages from KKM (Malaysia Ministry of Health) and MySejahtera, claiming that they are scam messages.

RM0 MySejahtera: You are COVID-19 positive. Kindly refresh your MySejahtera Profile and click to declare your close contact: https://bit.ly/3jNvOqL

RM0 KKM Anda adlh COVID19 positif & masih belum menjawab status kesihatan hari ini. Segera lengkapkan H.A.T. di MySejahtera. Rujuk https://bit.ly/2VMaWrC

This is a scam. If receive don’t click. Please inform all ur family members and friends ….NETIZEN WATCHDOG

Many also include a link to the Kuan Evening Edition video to prove that these messages are indeed fake messages used by scammers in “phishing attacks”.

 

Truth : KKM + MySejahtera SMS Messages Are Legit!

The SMS messages in the screenshot are legit, and came from KKM and MySejahtera.

The truth is that viral message is FAKE NEWS, and here are the facts…

Fact #1 : The MySejahtera SMS Message Is Legitimate

The MySejahtera SMS message in English is legitimate. It warns you that you have tested positive for COVID-19.

You are therefore required to declare your close contacts in the MySejahtera app or website.

The link – https://bit.ly/3jNvOqL – leads to the Close Contact reporting page in the MySejahtera website (https://mysejahtera.malaysia.gov.my/help/closecontact/).

Fact #2 : The KKM Telephone Number Is Genuine

On 24 September 2021, KKM confirmed that the 03-2703-3000 telephone number is genuine.

The Malaysia Ministry of Health uses that telephone number to call those identified as COVID-19 positive to fill up their Home Assessment Tool (HAT) in the MySejahtera app.

Fact #3 : The KKM SMS Message Is Legitimate

The KKM SMS message in Bahasa Malaysia is also legitimate.

It is a reminder that you did not fill in your Home Assessment Tool (HAT) in the MySejahtera app today.

Those who are under home quarantine must complete that home assessment test every day.

The Ministry of Health may issue a compound if you fail to perform the home assessment test, as required.

The link in the SMS – https://bit.ly/2VMaWrC – actually leads to a PDF infographic on the Home Assessment Tool (HAT) – https://www.infosihat.gov.my/images/media_sihat/poster/pdf/DiManakahHAT.pdf

The infographic explains who needs to perform self-monitoring using the HAT feature, and how to do it in the MySejahtera app.

Now that you know the truth, please SHARE this fact check, so your family and friends won’t be fooled by the fake news!

It is critical that everyone understands that these alerts are genuine, and take them seriously!

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Scam Alert : CIMB Customers Hit By Fake SMS Messages!

Scammers continue to target CIMB customers, using many different kinds of fake SMS messages.

Do NOT click or call if you receive any of these fake SMS messages!

And please warn your family and friends!

 

Scam Alert : CIMB Customers Hit By Fake SMS Messages!

Whether you are a CIMB Bank customer or not, you may receive one of these alarming SMS messages :

RM 0.00 CIMB: Confidential!

Dear CIMB users, your account will TERMINATED on 24/12/20. Verify via http://www.cimbclickikm.cc to keep on using CIMB Clicks services.

Please make verification within 24hours to avoid service interruption.

RM0 CIMB: Instant Transfer RM4998.78 to CHAY LEE FEN/HONG LEONG on 23-Dec-2020, 13:06:35. Call the no. at the back of your card for queries.

If you receive any of these SMS messages, please DO NOT click on the link, or call the number. JUST IGNORE THEM, or delete them.

RM0.00 CIMB: MYR 2968.00 was charged on your card num 4204 at Shopee.MY. If this is not your txn, call 1800-9767 now.

Cimb Your account is judged as high risk by the system, PLS re-verify your account. cimbclicksecurity.com

Note : These scams do not just affect CIMB Bank. In fact, all banks are affected :

 

Why These CIMB SMS Messages Are Fake

Let us show you how to identify these fake CIMB SMS messages.

If you spot any of these warning signs, BACK OFF and DO NOT PROCEED!

Warning Sign #1 : Grammatical Mistakes

If you carefully read the first SMS messages above, you can easily spot numerous grammatical mistakes. A bank will never send such poorly worded messages to their customers.

However, they may copy the real SMS message from CIMB to trick you into thinking that this is a real transaction. Such fake SMS messages will have proper grammar.

Warning Sign #2 : Embedded Links

Banks will NEVER embed links (URLs) into the message. If you see embedded links, always think – SCAM SMS!

Unlike the Public Bank SMS scam, they used a copy of the real SMS message to trick you into clicking the URL in the first message.

Warning Sign #3 : Wrong Links

And always check the link – www.cimbclickikm.cc and cimbclicksecurity.com are not the correct addresses for the CIMB Bank websites (www.cimbclicks.com.my or www.cimb.com.my).

The best policy is to manually key in the bank website address. NEVER click on any link in an SMS, even if it looks legit.

When you see any website with .cc links, be wary because the .CC domains are registered in the Cocos (Keeling) Islands – an Australian territory of only 14 km², with only about 600 inhabitants.

Warning Sign #4 : No Personal Login Phrase / Picture

To avoid phishing attacks, banks now give you a secret response (like a picture or a phrase) to confirm that you are visiting their legitimate website.

If the website you are visiting gives you the wrong picture or secret phrase, you have been tricked into visiting a fake website designed to mimic the real bank website.

You should also remember that the bank website must show you secret picture or phrase right after you enter your login, but BEFORE you key in your password.

If you are asked to key in your password without the website displaying the secret phrase or picture, you have been tricked into visiting a fake website designed to mimic the real bank website.

 

CIMB Advice To Protect Against Fake SMS / Email Scams

Here is a list of DOs and DON’Ts to protect yourself against fake SMS / email scams.

Please DO follow these good practices

  1. Pay attention to your transaction alerts and check your account activities regularly. In case of any unusual activity, please contact us immediately.
  2. If you wish to contact us, ONLY call the number on the back of your card or refer to CIMB website “Contact Us” page.
  3. Always check the URL of the website that you are making purchases from. Ensure  the “lock” icon or “https” appears on the website’s address bar.
  4. Always find a reputable seller on online marketplaces by searching for reviews from other customers to know their experience.
  5. To access CIMB Clicks, type the entire URL as follows: www.cimbclicks.com.my
  6. Always remember to log out once you have completed your banking transactions.

Please DO NOT follow these bad practices

  1. Don’t panic and give personal information to fraudsters impersonating representatives of government agencies etc. even if they deploy fear tactics. Immediately call the number on the back of your card to verify with CIMB.
  2. Never apply for personal financing through unverified links or individuals promising a lower rate. CIMB does not impose any application charges for personal financing applications.
  3. Never take instructions from anyone to change the mobile number in CIMB records to any number other than your own mobile number.
  4. When transacting online, never continue with a purchase if you have any doubts if the seller is not genuine.
  5. Never share details such as your card number / User ID / PIN / password / TAC  with anyone or key them in in any website other than CIMB Clicks.
    (Note: CIMB will never ask for  your ‘User ID’, ‘Password’ or ‘TAC’ under any circumstances outside of CIMB Clicks).
  6. Do not click on links or open email attachments from unknown / unreliable senders / sources.
    (Note: Emails from CIMB will always end with @cimb.com such as cimb.marketing@cimb.com

 

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Scam Warning : Public Bank Customers Hit By Fake SMS!

Scammers continue to target Public Bank customers, using many different kinds of fake SMS messages.

Do NOT click or call if you receive any of these fake SMS messages!

 

Public Bank : Fake SMS Scam Warning! Do NOT Click / Call!

Whether you are a Public Bank customer or not, you may receive one of these alarming SMS messages.

Please DO NOT click on the link, or call the number. JUST IGNORE THEM, or delete them.

The safest thing to do is NEVER CLICK ON A LINK in any SMS. If you need to log into your bank account, key in the website address manually.

RM0 PBB/PIBB: Your PBB account will TERMINATED on 02Dec20 01:30:00 AM. Please make verification via http://www.mypbebank.cc to avoid service interruption. Verify now keep on using PBB services.

RM0 Credit Cash out RM3,000 form card ending no 7102 successful on 01 DEC. Information system sending. Call PBB 1800-81-9566 for any query

Warning: Your account is marked as insecure, please click Return PAC immediately to confirm that it is safe to use. (https://pbevip.vip/)

PBe Your account is in a high-risk state PLS log in immediately and return the PAC to protect your account security https://www.pbebanks.top

PBe Warning: Phishing URLs are frequent recently, PLS log in immediately to strengthen account security. 2Mar21 13:14 https://se1.pbevip.top/

PB e Your account is in a high-risk by the system, PLS re-verify your account https://pbbanks.red/ <security reminder is normal>

RM0 PIBB: Thank you for using your card ending 1098@senQ MYR 2899, Pls call 03-56260232 now, if you didn’t use it

RM0 PBB/PIBB: Trx amt MYR2699.00  @LAZADA for card ending 5738. Call PB 1-800-81-2337 now if didn t perform.

PBB: Your account is judged as high risk by the system. PLS re-verify your account https://www.pbebanks.asia/ <security reminder is normal>

PB e Alarm Your banking Suit now is marked as insecure, PLS re-verify your account https://online-pbebank.com <security reminder is normal>

 

Public Bank Fake SMS Scam : What Happens If You Click?

Clicking on the links will often lead you to a phishing website, a fake website designed to look like a Public Bank website.

You will be asked to key in your personal information, including your Public Bank user name and password. DO NOT KEY IN YOUR INFORMATION!

But if you are free and want to help screw these scammers, key in fake information as many times as possible.

Note : These scams do not just affect Public Bank. In fact, all banks are affected :

 

Public Bank : How To Identify Fake SMS Messages

With a little help from Public Bank, let’s show you how to identify fake SMS messages.

If you spot any of these warning signs, BACK OFF and DO NOT PROCEED!

Warning Sign #1 : Grammatical Mistakes

Read the two SMS messages above, and you can easily spot numerous grammatical mistakes. A bank will never send such poorly worded messages to their customers.

Warning Sign #2 : Embedded Links

Banks will NEVER embed links (URLs) into the message. If you see embedded links, always think – SCAM SMS!

Warning Sign #3 : Wrong Links

And always check the link – www.mypbebank.cc is not the correct address for the Public Bank website (www.pbebank.com)

When you see any website with .cc links, be wary because the .CC domains are registered in the Cocos Islands – an Australian territory of only 14 km², with only about 600 inhabitants.

The same goes for generic, top level domains like .TOP, .VIP, .TOP, .RED.ASIA, etc.

Warning Sign #4 : No Personal Login Phrase / Picture

To avoid phishing attacks, banks now give you a secret response (like a picture or a phrase) to confirm that you are visiting their legitimate website.

If the website you are visiting gives you the wrong picture or secret phrase, you have been tricked into visiting a fake website designed to mimic the real bank website.

You should also remember that the bank website must show you secret picture or phrase right after you enter your login, but BEFORE you key in your password.

If you are asked to key in your password without the website displaying the secret phrase or picture, you have been tricked into visiting a fake website designed to mimic the real bank website.

 

Recommended Reading

Go Back To > Cybersecurity | BusinessHome

 

Support Tech ARP!

If you like our work, you can help support us by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!