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AMD Ryzen 5000 Series : What You Need To Know!

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series : What You Need To Know!

AMD just announced the Ryzen 5000 series of desktop processors, featuring the new Zen 3 architecture!

Here is a quick round up of what AMD revealed about the Ryzen 5000 desktop processors!

 

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series : Official Launch Briefing

The AMD Ryzen 5000 series is designed using the new AMD Zen 3 architecture, and fabricated on the 7 nm process.

The Zen 3 architecture delivers 19% more instructions per cycle (IPC) over the last generation, thanks to these new features :

  • improved load / store performance and flexibility
  • double the size of directly-accessible L3 cache per core
  • a unified 8-core complex (CCX) with direct access to the 32 MB L3 cache
  • wider issue in floating point and integer engines
  • Zero Bubble branch prediction

The new architecture also reduces memory latency through improved core and cache communication, and offer a higher maximum boost clock.

This allows the Ryzen 5000 series desktop processors to deliver up to 2.8X more performance-per-watt versus the competition.

The Ryzen 5000 series desktop processors can be installed unto existing AMD 500 series motherboards, after a simple BIOS update.

 

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series : Models + Specifications

AMD is introducing four AMD Ryzen 5000 series desktop processors :

  • Ryzen 9 5950X : 16C/32T | 105W | 3.4 GHz to 4.9 GHz | 72MB cache
  • Ryzen 9 5900X : 12C/24T | 105W | 3.7 GHz to 4.8 GHz | 70MB cache
  • Ryzen 7 5800X : 8C/16T | 105W | 3.8 GHz to 4.7 GHz | 36MB cache
  • Ryzen 5 5600X : 6C/12T | 65W | 3.7 GHz to 4.6 GHz | 35MB cache

For easier comparison, here is a table comparing their key specifications :

Specifications Ryzen 9
5950X
Ryzen 9
5900X
Ryzen 7
5800X
Ryzen 5
5600X
Architecture Zen 3
Fab Process 7 nm (CCD) + 12 nm (IOD)
Cores / Threads 16 / 32 12 / 24 8 / 16 6 / 12
Base Clock 3.4 GHz 3.7 GHz 3.8 GHz 3.7 GHz
Boost Clock 4.9 GHz 4.8 GHz 4.7 GHz 4.6 GHz
L1 Cache 1 MB 768 KB 512 KB 384 KB
L2 Cache 8 MB 6 MB 4 MB 3 MB
L3 Cache 64 MB 32 MB
TDP 105 W 65 W
Cooler None Wraith
Stealth

 

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series : Performance

First up, Robert Hallock shared that the Ryzen 9 5900X delivers 28% better gaming performance (at 1080p) in Shadow of the Tomb Raider, compared to the Ryzen 9 3900XT.

On average, the Ryzen 9 5900X offers 26% faster gaming, compared to the Ryzen 9 3900XT.

The AMD Ryzen 9 5900X is the first desktop processor to break 600 points in CINEBENCH single-thread performance.

The AMD Ryzen 9 5950X is even better, with a single-thread score of 640, according to Dr. Lisa Su.

Compared to the Intel Core i9-10900K, the Ryzen 9 5900X offers up to 21% better gaming performance at 1080p.

 

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series : Price + Availability

All four Ryzen 5000 processor models will be available for sale starting 5 November 2020, at these RRP :

  • Ryzen 9 5950X : US$799
  • Ryzen 9 5900X : US$549
  • Ryzen 7 5800X : US$449
  • Ryzen 5 5600X : US$299 (with Wraith Stealth cooler)

 

AMD Ryzen 5000 Series : Equipped To Win Game Bundle

Every purchase of the Ryzen 9 5950X, Ryzen 9 5900X and Ryzen 7 5800X between 5 November 2020 and 31 December 2020 will come with a free copy of Far Cry 6 Standard Edition for PC.

The same offer also applies to the Ryzen 9 3950X, Ryzen 9 3900XT and Ryzen 7 3800XT between 20 October 2020 and 31 December 2020.

 

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AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3000 Series : Full Details!

Now that the NDA is over, we can finally reveal EVERYTHING we know about the new AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO HEDT processor family!

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO : What Is It?

The AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO is a new HEDT processor family, mirroring what Ryzen PRO is to Ryzen.

Unlike the Ryzen Threadripper, the Threadripper PRO is targeted at professional studios, designers, engineers and data scientists.

The AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO series will offer these features over “regular” Threadripper processors.

  • new sWRX8 socket and WRX80 chipset
  • 8 DDR4-3200 memory channels, instead of just 4
  • 2X memory bandwidth over 3rd Gen Threadripper
  • Support for UDIMM, RDIMM, LDRIMM, 3DS RDIMM with ECC support, instead of just UDIMM with ECC
  • Up to 2 TB of memory, instead of just 256 GB
  • 128 PCIe 4.0 lanes, instead of just 64
  • AMD PRO Technologies, including Secure Processor and Memory Guard
  • 18 months of planned software stability
  • 24 months of planned availability

AMD has already chalked up one design win with the Lenovo ThinkStation P620 – the world’s first and only 64-core workstation!

Recommended : Lenovo ThinkStation P620 : World’s First 64-Core Workstation!

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO : Official Tech Briefing!

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO : Available Models

As of today’s launch, AMD is launching only these four processor models :

AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3995WX

This is the flagship, with 64 cores capable of processing up to 128 threads simultaneously. It comes with 288 MB of L2 and L3 caches, a 2.7 GHz base clock and a 4.2 GHz boost clock, with a 280 W TDP.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3975WX

This processor has 32 cores with the ability to process up to 64 threads simultaneously. It comes with 144 MB of L2 and L3 caches, a 3.5 GHz base clock and a 4.2 GHz boost clock, with a 280 W TDP.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3955WX

This processor has 16 cores with the ability to process up to 32 threads simultaneously. It comes with 72 MB of L2 and L3 caches, a 3.9 GHz base clock and a 4.3 GHz boost clock, with a 280 W TDP.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO 3945WX

This processor has 12 cores with the ability to process up to 24 threads simultaneously. It comes with 70 MB of L2 and L3 caches, a 4.0 GHz base clock and a 4.3 GHz boost clock, with a 280 W TDP.

There Is No Threadripper PRO 3965WX

Although earlier rumoured, this 24-core, 48-thread processor will not be released, at least not on 14 July 2020.

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO : Specifications

In this table, we compare the key specifications of the four processor models :

Specifications TR PRO
3995WX
TR PRO
3975WX
TR PRO
3955WX
TR PRO
3945WX
Fab Process 7 nm (CPU) + 12 nm (I/O)
Cores / Threads 64 / 128 32 / 64 16 / 32 12 / 24
Base Clock 2.7 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.9 GHz 4.0 GHz
Boost Clock 4.2 GHz 4.3 GHz
L1 Cache 4 MB 2 MB 1 MB 768 KB
L2 Cache 32 MB 16 MB 8 MB 6 MB
L3 Cache 256 MB 128 MB 64 MB
Memory Support 8 x DDR4-3200 channels
2 TB maximum
PCIe Support 128 x PCIe Gen 4 lanes
TDP 280 W

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper PRO : Performance

Threadripper PRO 3945WX

According to AMD, the “baby” of the family will offer 12% better single-threaded performance in CINEBENCH R20, and 28% better multi-threaded performance than a competing 12-core Intel Xeon processor.

They say that this is targeted at those whose software is licensed on a per-core basis. Its high performance per core will allow for better performance, without resorting to more cores and corresponding licence fees.

Threadripper PRO 3955WX

AMD also showed how the 16-core 3955WX can render 14% faster than an 18-core Intel Xeon processor.

Threadripper PRO 3995WX

AMD compared the flagship Threadripper PRO 3995WX with its 64 cores against two Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 processors, with 56 cores.

In the SPECviewperf13 benchmark, that 8-core, 16-thread advantage gave the 3995WX a performance advantage between 4% and 37%.

 

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AMD Ryzen XT CPUs : Not Turbocharged But Has Free Game!

AMD just launched three XT additions to the 3rd Gen Ryzen family of processors – the Ryzen 9 3900XT, Ryzen 7 3800XT and Ryzen 5 3600XT.

Here’s a quick comparison of the three new Ryzen XT processors, and how they match up against existing 3rd Gen Ryzen processors!

 

AMD Ryzen XT : Turbocharged? Not Quite…

The Ryzen 9 3900XT, Ryzen 7 3800XT and Ryzen 5 3600XT are higher-speed variants existing 3rd Gen Ryzen processors.

These XT variants are slightly different in their performance and the cooler they come with.

While the XT postfix implied these are turbocharged processors, that depends on the model :

  • 3900XT vs 3900X : 100 MHz faster boost clock + $50 higher price tag, no Wraith Prism RGB cooler
  • 3800XT vs 3800X : 200 MHz faster boost clocks, no Wraith Prism RGB cooler.
  • 3600XT vs 3600X : 100 MHz faster boost clock, Wraith Spire instead of Wraith Stealth

Here is the official tech briefing to  take you through its key features :

 

AMD Ryzen XT : Price + Availability

Here are the official prices for the new AMD Ryzen XT processors, which will be available for purchase starting 7 July 2020.

  • AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT : $499 / ~£397 / ~A$723 / RM 2,299
  • AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT : $399 / ~£317 / ~A$578 / RM 1,899
  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT : $249 / ~£198 / ~A$361 / RM 1,199

To sweeten the deal, AMD is offering a FREE copy of Assassin’s Creed Valhalla with every purchase of a Ryzen 9 XT or Ryzen 7 XT processor, from 7 July until 3 October 2020!

Unfortunately, the Ryzen 5 3600XT does NOT qualify for the free game… 🙁

 

AMD Ryzen XT : Specifications Compared!

In this table, we compare the new Ryzen 9 3900XT against the Ryzen 9 3950X and Ryzen 9 3900X processors.

Specifications Ryzen 9
3950X
Ryzen 9
3900XT
Ryzen 9
3900X
Fab Process 7 nm (CPU) + 12 nm (I/O)
Cores / Threads 16 / 32 12 / 24
Base Clock 3.5 GHz 3.8 GHz
Boost Clock 4.7 GHz 4.7 GHz 4.6 GHz
L2 Cache 8 MB 6 MB
L3 Cache 64 MB
PCIe Support PCIe Gen 4 (24 lanes)
TDP 105 W
Bundled Cooler NA Wraith Prism
RGB
Launch Price $749 $499 $449

And here is the Ryzen 7 3800XT compared to the Ryzen 7 3800X and Ryzen 7 3700X.

Specifications Ryzen 7
3800XT
Ryzen 7
3800X
Ryzen 7
3700X
Fab Process 7 nm (CPU) + 12 nm (I/O)
Cores / Threads 8 / 16
Base Clock 3.9 GHz 3.6 GHz
Boost Clock 4.7 GHz 4.5 GHz 4.4 GHz
L2 Cache 4 MB
L3 Cache 32 MB
PCIe Support PCIe Gen 4 (24 lanes)
TDP 105 W 65 W
Bundled Cooler NA Wraith Prism RGB
Launch Price $399 $399 $329

Finally, we compared the Ryzen 5 3600XT against the Ryzen 5 3600X and Ryzen 5 3600.

Specifications Ryzen 5
3600XT
Ryzen 5
3600X
Ryzen 5
3600
Fab Process 7 nm (CPU) + 12 nm (I/O)
Cores / Threads 6 / 12
Base Clock 3.8 GHz 3.6 GHz
Boost Clock 4.5 GHz 4.4 GHz 4.2 GHz
L2 Cache 3 MB
L3 Cache 32 MB
PCIe Support PCIe Gen 4 (24 lanes)
TDP 95 W 65 W
Bundled Cooler Wraith
Spire
Wraith
Stealth
Wraith
Spire
Launch Price $249 $249 $199

 

AMD Ryzen XT : Our First Impressions

To be honest, the AMD Ryzen XT processors don’t really excite us that much, and here’s why…

AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT

The Ryzen 9 3900XT has a slightly faster boost clock and loses its bundled cooler. Yet it costs $50 more than the Ryzen 9 3900X.

It would be better to stick with the cheaper Ryzen 9 3900 – you won’t notice the difference. And in case it’s not “fast enough” (seriously?), you can just overclock it.

AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT

This is the second-best Ryzen XT model of the trio, offering a 200 MHz faster boost clock than the Ryzen 7 3800X at the same price point.

You are basically trading the bundled Wraith Prism RGB cooler for a 200 MHz faster boost clock.

Frankly, unless you are planning to use water cooling, it might be a better idea to just buy the Ryzen 7 3800X and overclock using its Wraith Prism RGB cooler.

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT

This is really the best Ryzen XT model, offering a slightly faster boost clock with a better Wraith Spire cooler, at the same price as the Ryzen 5 3600X.

That makes the Ryzen 5 3600X completely pointless. We wouldn’t be surprised if AMD drops price on the Ryzen 5 3600X, or removes it from the line-up.

 

AMD Ryzen XT : Free Game Changes Dynamics!

AMD’s surprise announcement that they will bundle a free copy of the upcoming AAA game – Assassin’s Creed Valhalla – changed everything.

If you are a gamer planning to buy this game, then it’s a great deal, because the game costs US$59.99 / £49.99 / RM 189.99!

Unfortunately, the Ryzen 5 3600XT does NOT qualify for the free game… 🙁

 

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AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT In-Depth Review : Seriously?

The AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT (US | UK | AU | SG | MY) is a slightly faster variant of the Ryzen 5 3600X, with a better CPU cooler.

Find out how it fares against the other processors, and why it left us quite perplexed…

 

AMD Ryzen 3000XT : Turbocharged? Not Quite…

The Ryzen 9 3900XT, Ryzen 7 3800XT and Ryzen 5 3600XT are higher-speed variants existing 3rd Gen Ryzen processors. These XT variants are slightly different in their performance and the cooler they come with.

While the XT postfix implied these are turbocharged processors, that depends on the model :

  • 3900XT vs 3900X : 100 MHz faster boost clock + $50 higher price tag, no Wraith Prism RGB cooler
  • 3800XT vs 3800X : 200 MHz faster boost clocks, no Wraith Prism RGB cooler.
  • 3600XT vs 3600X : 100 MHz faster boost clock, Wraith Spire instead of Wraith Stealth

 

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT Specifications Compared!

In this table, we compare the Ryzen 5 3600XT against the Ryzen 5 3600X and Ryzen 5 3600.

Specifications Ryzen 5
3600XT
Ryzen 5
3600X
Ryzen 5
3600
Fab Process 7 nm (CPU) + 12 nm (I/O)
Cores / Threads 6 / 12
Base Clock 3.8 GHz 3.6 GHz
Boost Clock 4.5 GHz 4.4 GHz 4.2 GHz
L2 Cache 3 MB
L3 Cache 32 MB
PCIe Support PCIe Gen 4 (24 lanes)
TDP 95 W 65 W
Bundled Cooler Wraith
Spire
Wraith
Stealth
Wraith
Spire
Launch Price $249 $249 $199

 

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT : Price + Availability

Here are the official prices for the AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT (US | UK | AU | SG | MY) processor, which will be available for purchase starting 7 July 2020.

  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT : $249 / ~£198 / ~A$361 / RM 1,199

And here are online purchase options :

And in case you are wondering, NO, it does not come with the free Assassin’s Creed Valhalla game.

 

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT Unboxed!

The AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT (US | UK | AU | SG | MY) comes in a large retail box, bundled with an AMD Wraith Spire cooler inside.

When you fully unbox it, this is what you will find inside :

  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT processor
  • AMD Wraith Spire CPU cooler
  • AMD Ryzen 5 case badge
  • AMD desktop CPU installation sheet

 

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT Hands-On Experience!

The AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT (US | UK | AU | SG | MY) has six Ryzen processor cores, with a 3.8 GHz base clock, and a 4.5 GHz boost clock.

It supports SMT (simultaneous multi-threading), and can therefore handle 12 threads simultaneously. It also has a 95W TDP.

Like the previous generations, it has 512 KB L2 cache per core, with a total L2 cache size of 3 MB. But thanks to a larger transistor budget, it has a very large 32 MB L3 cache – twice that of the last-generation 2nd Gen Ryzen processors!

Like all other 3rd Gen Ryzen desktop processors, AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT still uses the AMD AM4 socket, and is drop-in compatible with existing AM4 motherboards.

You can just swap out your existing 3rd Gen Ryzen processor and drop in this processor without a BIOS update. If you are upgrading an older motherboard, make sure first update its BIOS to support the 3rd Gen Ryzen processor.

Next Page > AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT Work Performance

 

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AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT Benchmarking Notes

In this review, we will take a look at the work and gaming performance of the AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT, comparing it to 6 other processors :

Here is a quick comparison of their key specifications :

Cores /
Threads
Base Clock Boost Clock L2 Cache L3 Cache Memory
AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 8 / 16 3.7 GHz 4.3 GHz 4 MB 16 MB DDR4-2933
Intel Core i7-8700K 6 / 12 3.7 GHz 4.7 GHz 1.5 MB 12 MB DDR4-2666
AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT 6 / 12 3.8 GHz 4.5 GHz 3 MB 32 MB DDR4-3200
AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 6 / 12 3.8 GHz 4.4 GHz 3 MB 32 MB DDR4-3200
AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 6 / 12 3.6 GHz 4.2 GHz 3 MB 16 MB DDR4-2933
AMD Ryzen 5 1600X 6 / 12 3.6 GHz 4.0 GHz 3 MB 16 MB DDR4-2666
AMD Ryzen 3 3300X 4 / 8 3.8 GHz 4.3 GHz 2 MB 16 MB DDR4-3200

Here are the specifications of the Intel and AMD testbeds we used.

Intel Testbed AMD Testbed
Motherboard ASUS ROG Strix Z370-F-Gaming ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero
Memory G.SKILL Sniper X DDR4-3400 (8 GB x 2)
Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3200 (8 GB x 2)
Graphics NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (GeForce 451.48)
Storage 1TB SanDisk Ultra 3D SSD
OS Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

 

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT : 3D Rendering Speed

CINEBENCH R20 is a real-world 3D rendering benchmark based on the MAXON Cinema 4D animation software.

It is a great way to accurately determine the actual performance of a processor in 3D content creation.

CINEBENCH R20 Single Core Performance

This Single Core test is not reflective of real world performance, but it is useful to find out the performance of the individual core.

Its high base clock and large L3 cache appears to give the Ryzen 5 3600XT an advantage over the other processors in the single core test, besting the Ryzen 7 2700X by 22.7%.

CINEBENCH R20 Multi Core Performance

The Multi Core test shows the processor’s real-world 3D rendering performance.

This is very good performance for a 6-core processor, performing just 4.4% slower than the Ryzen 7 2700X, which is an 8-core, 16-thread processor.

But note that it is just 2.2% faster than the Ryzen 5 3600X. Its performance advantages are mainly due to microarchitecture improvements in the 3rd Gen Ryzen.

Multi-Threading Boost

This is not a CINEBENCH benchmark result. The Multi-Threading Boost is our calculation of the performance boost that the processor’s Multi-Threading capability provides.

While performing better than the Ryzen 7 2700X, the Ryzen 5 3600XT does not do as well as the Ryzen 3 3300X, which has all of its processor cores in the same CCD (Core Chipset Die).

 

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT : Transcoding Speed

HandBrake is a free, open-source video transcoding utility, which converts a video file from one resolution / format to another.

As you can imagine, it’s very compute-intensive, which makes it a great benchmark for multi-core processors. In our test, we converted a 4K video of 1.3 GB in size into a 1080p video (HQ1080p30).

Despite having just six cores, the Ryzen 5 3600XT is 91.3% as fast as the Ryzen 7 2700X, which has 8 cores.

But notably, it’s just 1.4% faster than the Ryzen 5 3600X.

 

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT : Radial Blur Speed

The radial blur filter adds the perception of motion to a picture. This is a compute-intensive operation that benefits from multiple processing cores.

This radial blur test was performed on Photoshop CC 14 using a single 13.5 megapixel photo, with a filesize of 4,910,867 bytes.

As a 6-core processor, the Ryzen 5 3600XT did well, coming within 17.6% of the 8-core Ryzen 7 2700X.

It also had a slightly wider 4% performance advantage over the Ryzen 5 3600X..

Next Page > AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT Gaming Performance Part 1

 

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Synthetic Game Test : 3DMark

We used 3DMark’s Time Spy and Time Spy Extreme synthetic benchmarks, which supports DirectX 12, and the latest features like asynchronous compute, and multi-threading support.

Time Spy – 2560 x 1440

The AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT was just 5.2% slower than the Core i7-8700K, and 16.9% slower than the Ryzen 7 2700X.

Of course, the CPU only has a slight influence on a game’s performance, so its effect on the overall gaming score is less significant.

Surprisingly, the AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT actually edged out the Core i7-8700K, and was just 2% slower than the Ryzen 7 2700X.

Time Spy Extreme – 3840 x 2160

At the higher 4K resolution, the AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT was just 3.2% slower than the Core i7-8700K, and 5.4% slower than the Ryzen 7 2700X.

Now check out the processors’ effect on the overall gaming score…

At 4K, it was neck-to-neck with the Core i7-8700K and the Ryzen 7 2700X. Obviously, CPU performance only has a small effect at this resolution.

 

F1 2019

F1 2019 is a relatively recent racing game by Codemasters, released on 28 June 2019.

We tested it on three resolutions at the Ultra High settings :

  • 1080p : 1920 x 1080
  • 1440p : 2560 x 1440

1080p Gaming Resolution

Look at that. This is why the number of CPU cores don’t really matter when it comes to games. CPU performance has only a small effect on the frame rate.

1440p Gaming Resolution

At the higher 1440p resolution, the importance of CPU performance was even smaller.

Next Page > Ryzen 5 3600XT Gaming Performance Part 2 | Our Verdict!

 

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World War Z

Based on the 2013 movie, World War Z is a relatively recent third-person shooter game, released in April 2019.

We tested it on three resolutions using the Vulkan API at the High settings :

  • 1080p : 1920 x 1080
  • 1440p : 2560 x 1440

1080p Gaming Resolution

The AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT did well, tying with the Core i7-8700K and Ryzen 5 3600X. But as you can see, the effect of CPU performance on frame rate is small, even at 1080p.

1440p Gaming Resolution

When we bumped the resolution up to 1440p, it really didn’t matter that much which processor you used.

 

Ashes of the Singularity

Ashes of the Singularity is a 2016 game that supports multi-core processing and asynchronous compute.

In this game, the single core CPU performance has a significant effect on the actual frame rate.

We tested it on three resolutions using the DirectX 12 API at the High settings :

  • 1080p : 1920 x 1080
  • 1440p : 2560 x 1440

1080p Gaming Resolution

Showcasing the importance of single-core performance, the Ryzen 5 3600X came within 7% of the Core i7-8700K.

But note that it was just 1.5% faster than the Ryzen 5 3600X, and just 3.5% faster than the Ryzen 3 3300X!

1440p Gaming Resolution

At the higher 1440p resolution, the Ryzen 5 3600X was just 6.2% slower than the Core i7-8700K, and just 1.8% faster than the Ryzen 5 3600X, and 6.7% faster than the Ryzen 3 3300X.

 

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT : Our Verdict!

Built around the Zen 2 microarchitecture, the AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT (US | UK | AU | SG | MY) uses a chiplet design which combines 7 nm and 12 nm parts to deliver a more powerful, and power-efficient processor at a great price point.

The end result is significantly better single-core and multi-core performance over previous generation Ryzen processors.

There is no doubt that this 6-core, 12-thread processor offers great performance at a great price point, with a better Wraith Spire cooler to boot.

That said, we cannot understand why AMD would bother coming up with it in the first place.

On paper, it only offers a 100 MHz faster boost clock and a better Wraith Spire cooler over the existing Ryzen 5 3600X.

In real life, that translates into a negligible 1%~4% performance advantage over the Ryzen 5 3600X that no one will really notice.

Think of the Ryzen 5 3600XT as the Ryzen 5 3600X with a better Wraith Spire cooler… and a FREE game!

So who should, or should NOT, buy the AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT (US | UK | AU | SG | MY)?

  • Buy : If it is the same price as the Ryzen 5 3600X, or at most 5% more expensive
  • Consider : If you are upgrading from a first-generation or second-generation Ryzen.
  • Avoid : If you are already using a 3rd Gen Ryzen processor, especially for a gaming system

Another alternative would be to purchase a Ryzen 5 3600X, especially if it is 10-15% cheaper.

 

AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT : Where To Buy?

Here are the official prices for the AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT (US | UK | AU | SG | MY) processor, which will be available for purchase starting 7 July 2020.

  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT : $249 / ~£198 / ~A$361 / RM 1,199

And here are online purchase options :

 

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Fact Check : AMD Ryzen 4000 Will Use 5nm TSMC Process?

Is it true that the upcoming AMD Ryzen 4000 (Zen 3) desktop processors will be fabricated on the 5nm TSMC process, instead of 7nm as announced? Let’s find out!

 

AMD Ryzen 4000 : Zen 2 | Zen 3

At CES 2020, AMD launched the Ryzen 4000 family of mobile processors, which only just kicked off after delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

AMD is expected to introduce the Ryzen 4000 family of desktop processors, built on a newer Zen 3 microarchitecture, later this year.

AMD’s naming convention confuses people, because the Ryzen 4000 mobile processors are 3rd Gen Ryzen processors, while the upcoming Ryzen 4000 desktop processors will be 4th Gen Ryzen processors.

To make it easier for you to understand, we created this table to differentiate the two processor families.

Specifications Ryzen 4000
Desktop
Ryzen 4000
Mobile
Ryzen Generation 4th Gen 3rd Gen
Microarchitecture Zen 3 Zen 2
Fabrication Process Improved 7 nm 7 nm
Launch Date Late 2020 Jan 2020

 

DigiTimes : AMD Ryzen 4000 Will Use 5nm TSMC Process

A DigiTimes article, purportedly translated and posted by RetiredEngineer, claimed that the next-generation AMD Ryzen 4000 desktop processors, using the Zen 3 microarchitecture, will be fabricated on the brand-new 5nm process technology, instead of 7nm as announced earlier.

Rumor has it that AMD and TSMC have adjusted their foundry blueprints. The Ryzen 4000 series of desktop processors originally expected to launch at the end of 2020 will now use TSMC’s enhanced 5nm process (5nm Plus) instead of 7nm EUV, clearly demonstrating that AMD is now considered a tier-one customer for TSMC.

This new development confirms earlier news that TSMC, which only recently entered the 5nm era in April, is accelerating its enhanced 5nm process, bringing forward the mass production schedule to 4Q; and the enhanced 5nm Ryzen series processors will also put unprecedented pressure on Intel. Both TSMC and AMD declined to comment on rumors.

In the first quarter of 2020, AMD benefitted from the pandemic, which boosted demand due to the work-from-home economy. PC and server sales exceeded expectations; Ryzen and EPYC series processors shipments were strong, driving first quarter revenue up by 40% compared to the same period in 2019. Earnings were also better than market expectations.

Despite AMD’s conservative outlook for Q2, with revenue estimates between $1.75B and $1.95B, it is still up by 21% compared with the same period in 2019, and up 4% sequentially, still a good result despite the traditional low season for PCs and the impact of the pandemic.

As understood, AMD’s desktop and server shipments have strengthened across the board since the second half of 2019, and demand has exceeded market expectations. Even AMD themselves and TSMC were caught by surprise. This has led to significant improvements in AMD’s profitability. TSMC happily welcomes the growing strength of its chip customers.

According to sources in the semiconductor industry, AMD had announced a comprehensive partnership with TSMC for sub-7nm processes, and has also confirmed mass production schedules for 7nm, 7nm EUV, 5nm and 3nm products. However, beyond expectations, AMD’s performance took a Great Leap Forward over the last one and a half years. Board, PC and server manufacturers significantly increased their ‘weightage’ (adoption of AMD products relative to others), in part due to Intel’s chip shortages. More importantly, the partnership with TSMC resulted in drastically improved product performance and yield, as well as price competitiveness for AMD, leading to rising shipments and market share quarter after quarter.

In 2020, because of the huge increase in sales, AMD has been urgently chasing after TSMC to expedite orders. The size of those orders were not small, becoming the greatest fallback for TSMC, which got caught in the Huawei ban crisis, making demand and production planning extremely difficult. As a result, TSMC is also adjusting (broadening) its services for AMD, and in considering the optimum allocation of production capacity, modified the process plans for AMD’s products.

As understood, TSMC has entered the 5nm era since April. The enhanced version of 5nm will also enter mass production in Q4, ahead of market expectations, and the first customer to adopt it is AMD, with its new Ryzen 4000 series processors.

AMD’s new generation Ryzen 4000 series processor (codenamed Vermeer), originally planned to use 7nm EUV, will be unveiled around Sep-Oct, but in line with the mass production schedule of TSMC’s enhanced 5nm process, will only be launched at the end of the year or during CES in Jan 2021.

According to semiconductor industry players, AMD plonked down a lot of money to enter the enhanced 5nm era, hoping to build upon its success and expand its leadership in advanced process technology before Intel’s 10nm process is fully deployed and 7nm process is yet to debut, once again capitalising on the narrative around introduction of advanced process technology and performance/efficiency improvements, to narrow its market share with Intel.

Judging by AMD’s current momentum and product performance, the enhanced 5nm Ryzen series processors will put unprecedented pressure on Intel. If Intel does not cut prices or accelerate the introduction of 10nm desktop processors, its empire may be gradually eroded by AMD, ushering in the biggest change in the global PC platform competitive landscape in 15 years: AMD’s market share can be expected to reach historical highs.

Separately, Nvidia has finally joined the 7nm bandwagon recently, entering full production in the second half of the year, while 5nm capacity continues to be reserved for Apple and HiSilicon, although the status of HiSilicon’s orders after Q4 is unknown due to the heightened US ban on Huawei.

Now, we have not directly seen the DigiTimes article, so we cannot vouch for its authenticity. We only have this picture to go by :

 

5 Reasons Why AMD Ryzen 4000 Will NOT Use 5nm TSMC Process

We have no idea whether the DigiTimes article exists, or was translated accurately, but we seriously doubt it will happen. Here’s why…

Reason #1 : AMD Unlikely To Delay Ryzen 4000 Desktop Launch To 2021

AMD CEO Dr. Lisa Su confirmed at CES 2020 that Zen 3 will debut in 2020, most likely around October to make it in time for the year-end holiday season.

While the COVID-19 pandemic has delayed the consumer launch of the Ryzen 4000 mobile processors, it is unlikely to delay the launch of the Ryzen 4000 desktop processors until early 2021.

Reason #2 : Desktop Ryzen Processors Don’t “Need” 5nm

While shrinking die size is generally a good thing, desktop processors like the upcoming 4th Gen Ryzen 4000 CPUs do not “need” a die shrink.

The focus will be on achieving high clock speeds at lower costs. That’s why the 3rd Gen Ryzen 3000 desktop processors use a chiplet design – the CPU dies are fabricated on 7nm, while the I/O die is fabricated on 12nm.

A matured and improved 7nm process would allow the 4th Gen Ryzen 4000 processors to deliver higher clock speeds at a much lower cost than a new 5nm process.

Reason #3 : Mobile Ryzen Processors Will Likely Be First To Use 5nm

AMD is strongest in the desktop and HEDT segment, outperforming Intel by sheer brute force, thanks to the higher number of cores in their desktop Ryzen and Threadripper processors.

They are weakest in the mobile market, with Intel mobile processors still controlling the vast majority of the market.

To seriously take on Intel in this critical segment, AMD would probably leverage the costly 5nm process to give their future Ryzen 5000 mobile processors a significant advantage in both performance and power consumption.

Reason #4 : 5nm Not That Advantageous Over Improved 7nm

While a 5nm transistor node sounds like it will offer 28.5% smaller transistors than a 7nm node, the difference in reality is much smaller.

That’s partly because the transistor sizes – 7nm, 5nm – are really marketing terms, not precise engineering definitions – and partly because of diminishing returns.

In any case, the TSMC 5nm process promises to offer 25% better performance over 7nm, but their improved 7nm process will offer at least 10% better performance over 7nm.

In other words, the net performance difference between the TSMC 5nm and improved TSMC 7nm (N7+) is just 13.6%. The cost of 5nm would, no doubt, be far more than improved 7nm.

Reason #5 : 5nm Yields Are Still Poor

Another thing to consider with a new transistor node is yield. This is the problem Intel had with their 10nm process technology – poor yield.

As of December 2019, the 5nm TSMC process has an average yield per wafer of ~80% with a tiny die size of 17.92 mm2. That yield goes down to an abysmal 32% with a 100 mm2 die size.

While no one knows how big the Zen 3 die will be, it is safe to say it will be closer to 100 mm2. The Zen 2 die, for example, is 74 mm2 in size.

Will AMD risk the success of their 4th Gen Ryzen 4000 desktop processors on TSMC hitting reasonable yields on 5 nm? We think not!

 

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IOQD from The Tech ARP BIOS Guide!

IOQD

Common Options : 1, 4, 8, 12

 

IOQD : A Quick Review

The IOQD BIOS feature controls the use of the processor bus’ command queue.

Normally, there are only two options available. Depending on the motherboard chipset, the options could be (1 and 4), (1 and 8) or (1 and 12).

The first queue depth option is always 1, which prevents the processor bus pipeline from queuing any outstanding commands. If selected, each command will only be issued after the processor has finished with the previous one.

Therefore, every command will incur the maximum amount of latency. This varies from 4 clock cycles for a 4-stage pipeline to 12 clock cycles for pipelines with 12 stages.

In most cases, it is highly recommended that you enable command queuing by selecting the option of 4 / 8 / 12 or in some cases, Enabled.

This allows the processor bus pipeline to mask its latency by queuing outstanding commands. You can expect a significant boost in performance with this feature enabled.

Interestingly, this IOQD feature can also be used as an aid in overclocking the processor. Although the queuing of commands brings with it a big boost in performance, it may also make the processor unstable at overclocked speeds. To overclock beyond what’s normally possible, you can try disabling command queuing.

But please note that the performance deficit associated with deeper pipelines (8 or 12 stages) may not be worth the increase in processor overclockability. This is because the deep processor bus pipelines have very long latencies.

If they are not masked by command queuing, the processor may be stalled so badly that you may end up with poorer performance even if you are able to further overclock the processor. So, it is recommended that you enable command queuing for deep pipelines, even if it means reduced overclockability.

 

IOQD : The Details

For greater performance at high clock speeds, motherboard chipsets now feature a pipelined processor bus. The multiple stages in this pipeline can also be used to queue up multiple commands to the processor.

This command queuing greatly improves performance because it effectively masks the latency of the processor bus. In optimal situations, the amount of latency between each succeeding command can be reduced to only a single clock cycle!

The IOQD BIOS feature controls the use of the processor bus’ command queue. Normally, there are only two options available.

Depending on the motherboard chipset, the options could be (1 and 4), (1 and 8) or (1 and 12). This is because the IOQD BIOS feature does not actually allow you to select the number of commands that can be queued.

It merely allows you to disable or enable the command queuing capability of the processor bus pipeline. This is because the number of commands that can be queued depends entirely on the number of stages in the pipeline.

As such, you can expect to see IOQD to be associated with options like Enabled and Disabled in some motherboards.

The first queue depth option is always 1, which prevents the processor bus pipeline from queuing any outstanding commands.

If selected, each command will only be issued after the processor has finished with the previous one. Therefore, every command will incur the maximum amount of latency. This varies from 4 clock cycles for a 4-stage pipeline to 12 clock cycles for pipelines with 12 stages.

As you can see, this reduces performance as the processor has to wait for each command to filter down the pipeline. The severity of the effect depends greatly on the depth of the pipeline. The deeper the pipeline, the greater the effect.

If the second queue depth option is 4, this means that the processor bus pipeline has 4 stages in it. Selecting this option allows the queuing of up to 4 commands in the pipeline. Each command can then be processed successively with a latency of only 1 clock cycle.

If the second queue depth option is 8, this means that the processor bus pipeline has 8 stages in it. Selecting this option allows the queuing of up to 8 commands in the pipeline. Each command can then be processed successively with a latency of only 1 clock cycle.

If the second queue depth option is 12, this means that the processor bus pipeline has 12 stages in it. Selecting this option allows the queuing of up to 12 commands in the pipeline. Each command can then be processed successively with a latency of only 1 clock cycle.

Please note that the latency of only 1 clock cycle is only possible if the pipeline is completely filled up. If the pipeline is only partially filled up, then the latency affecting one or more of the commands will be more than 1 clock cycle. Still, the average latency for each command will be much lower than it would be with command queuing disabled.

In most cases, it is highly recommended that you enable command queuing by selecting the option of 4 / 8 / 12 or in some cases, Enabled. This allows the processor bus pipeline to mask its latency by queuing outstanding commands. You can expect a significant boost in performance with this feature enabled.

Interestingly, this IOQD feature can also be used as an aid in overclocking the processor. Although the queuing of commands brings with it a big boost in performance, it may also make the processor unstable at overclocked speeds.

To overclock beyond what’s normally possible, you can try disabling command queuing. This may reduce performance but it will make the processor more stable and may allow it to be further overclocked.

But please note that the performance deficit associated with deeper pipelines (8 or 12 stages) may not be worth the increase in processor overclockability. This is because the deep processor bus pipelines have very long latencies.

If they are not masked by command queuing, the processor may be stalled so badly that you may end up with poorer performance even if you are able to further overclock the processor. So, it is recommended that you enable command queuing for deep pipelines, even if it means reduced overclockability.

 

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AMD Fall 2019 Desktop Ryzen + Threadripper Update!

We just just received an update on Ryzen and Threadripper processors in the AMD Fall 2019 Desktop Update!

Here is our complete coverage of the AMD Fall 2019 Desktop Update, including tech briefing videos by Robert Hallock and Don Woligroski!

 

AMD Fall 2019 Desktop Update + Q&A Session With Don Woligroski

AMD kicked off their Fall 2019 Desktop Update with a tech briefing and Q&A session with Don Woligroski, AMD Desktop Processor Technical Marketing Manager.

 

AMD Fall 2019 Desktop Update By Robert Hallock

They then shared a separate, but similar, tech briefing by Robert Hallock, AMD Senior Technical Marketing Manager.

 

AMD Fall 2019 Desktop Update Summary

The AMD Fall 2019 Desktop Update can be broken into three sections :

  1. AMD Ryzen 9 3950X Processor
  • 16-core, 32-thread processor with 105 watt TDP
  • 3.5 GHz base clock, a 4.7 GHz boost clock, and a massive 64 MB L3 cache.
  • No bundled cooler, designed for water cooling with 280 mm or larger radiator
  • Launch price : $749
  • Availability : 25 November 2019
  • Full details : AMD Ryzen 9 3950X : Everything You Need To Know!

  1. AMD Athlon 3000G APU with Radeon Vega Graphics

  1. AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X | 3960X
  • Ryzen Threadripper 3970X : 32C / 64T, 4.5GHz / 3.7GHz, 144 MB cache
  • Ryzen Threadripper 3960X : 24C / 48T, 4.5GHz / 3.8GHz, 140 MB cache
  • Uses new Socket sTRX4 with new AMD TRX40 chipset
  • Launch price : $1999 (3970X) | $1399 (3960X)
  • Launch date : 25 November 2019
  • Full details : 3rd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper Tech Preview!

  1. New Eco-Mode For 3rd Gen Ryzen Processors

 

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CPUID Maximum Value Limit from The Tech ARP BIOS Guide!

CPUID Maximum Value Limit

Common Options : Enabled, Disabled

 

Quick Review of CPUID Maximum Value Limit

When the computer is booted up, the operating system executes the CPUID instruction to identify the processor and its capabilities.

The first step is to query the processor to find out the highest input value CPUID recognises, by executing CPUID with the EAX register set to 0. This determines the kind of basic information CPUID can provide the operating system.

The maximum CPUID input value determines the values that the operating system can write to the CPUID’s EAX register to obtain information about the processor.

However, if you attempt to use a new processor with an old operating system, that operating system may not be able to handle the extra CPUID information provided by the processor.

This is where the CPUID Maximum Value Limit BIOS feature comes in. It allows you to circumvent problems with older operating systems that do not support newer processors with extended CPUID information.

When enabled, the processor will limit the maximum CPUID input value to 03h when queried, even if the processor supports a higher CPUID input value.

When disabled, the processor will return the actual maximum CPUID input value of the processor when queried.

It is recommended that you leave it at the default setting of Disabled. You should only enable it if you intend to use a newer processor with an operating system that does not support it.

 

Details of CPUID Maximum Value Limit

When the computer is booted up, the operating system executes the CPUID instruction to identify the processor and its capabilities.

The first step is to query the processor to find out the highest input value CPUID recognises, by executing CPUID with the EAX register set to 0. This determines the kind of basic information CPUID can provide the operating system.

Here’s a table of the maximum CPUID input values the operating system will obtain from Intel processors when CPUID is executed with the EAX register set to 0.

IA-32 Processors Maximum CPUID
Input Value
Earlier Intel486 Processors CPUID Not Implemented
Later Intel486 Processors 01h
Pentium Processors 01h
Pentium Pro Processors 02h
Pentium II Processors 02h
Celeron Processors 02h
Pentium III Processors 03h
Pentium 4 Processors 02h
Xeon Processors 02h
Pentium M Processors 02h
Pentium 4 Processors
with Hyper-Threading Technology
05h

Now that it knows the maximum CPUID input value, the operating system can now write the correct values to the CPUID’s EAX register to obtain information about the processor.

Maximum CPUID
Input Value
EAX Input Values
Supported
01h 00h, 01h
02h 00h, 01h, 02h
03h 00h, 01h, 02h, 03h
05h 00h, 01h, 02h, 03h, 04h, 05h

Using those EAX input values, the operating system queries the processor for the following basic information.

EAX
Input Value
Possible Basic Information Provided by CPUID
00h EAX : Maximum input value for basic CPUID information
EBX : “Genu”
ECX : “ntel”
EDX : ineI”
01h EAX
– 
32-bit Processor Signature
– last 32 bits of the 96-bit processor serial numberEBX
– 
Brand Index
– CLFLUSH line size
– count of logical processors
– processor local APIC physical IDECX
– Processor feature flagsEDX
– Processor feature flags
02h EAX : Cache and TLB descriptors
EBX : Cache and TLB descriptors
ECX : Cache and TLB descriptors
EDX : Cache and TLB descriptors
03h EAX : Reserved
EBX : Reserved
ECX : First 32 bits of the 96-bit processor serial number
EDX : Second 32 bits of the 96-bit processor serial number
04h EAX
– Cache type
– Cache level
– Self-initializing cache level
– Presence of fully associative cache
– Number of threads sharing this cache
– Number of processor cores on this dieEBX
– System coherency line size
– Physical line partitions
– Ways of associativity
ECX : Number of sets
EDX : Reserved
05h EAX : MONITOR/MWAIT function
EBX : MONITOR/MWAIT function
ECX : Reserved
EDX : Reserved

 

Why Does CPUID Maximum Value Limit Matter?

However, if you attempt to use a new processor with an old operating system, that operating system may not be able to handle the extra CPUID information provided by the processor.

This is where the CPUID Maximum Value Limit BIOS feature comes in. It allows you to circumvent problems with older operating systems that do not support newer processors with extended CPUID information.

When enabled, the processor will limit the maximum CPUID input value to 03h when queried, even if the processor supports a higher CPUID input value. The operating system will only query the processor with EAX input values of up to 03h.

When disabled, the processor will return the actual maximum CPUID input value of the processor when queried.

By default, it is set to Disabled because all new operating systems are aware of current processors, and have no problem handling the additional CPUID information.

Irrespective of what you set this BIOS feature to, the operating system will first query the processor.

Only if the processor returns a maximum CPUID input value greater than 03h, will this BIOS feature be taken into account. If the processor returns a maximum CPUID input value of 03h or less, this BIOS feature will be ignored.

It is recommended that you leave it at the default setting of Disabled. You should only enable it if you intend to use a newer processor with an operating system that does not support it.

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A Little History Lesson

Historically, Intel processors from the Pentium Pro onwards have a maximum CPUID input value of only 02h or 03h. The only exception is the Intel Pentium 4 with Hyper-Threading Technology (HTT).

Older operating systems like Windows 95/98 and Windows Me were released before the Intel Pentium 4 with HTT, and are therefore not aware of such a processor.

This would not have been a problem if the Pentium 4 with HTT did not come with additional CPUID capabilities. Unfortunately, it has a maximum CPUID input value of 05h, as well as support for additional EAX input values of 04h and 05h.

When these operating systems boot up, they would receive a maximum CPUID input value of 05h from the processor – which they were not programmed to handle. Therefore, they were not able to initialise the processor properly.

 

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The 10th Gen Intel Core Processor Number Guide!

The 10th Gen Intel Core processor family, now consists of Ice Lake and Comet Lake processors, each with a new and different processor number system.

Let’s take a look at the two new 10th Gen Intel Core processor number systems, and figure out what the letters and numbers mean!

 

10th Gen Intel Core Processor Primer

The 10th Gen Intel Core processor family, confusingly, consists of two distinctly different and separate processor lines.

10th Gen Intel Ice Lake

The 10th Gen Intel Ice Lake processors are the first to be purpose-built for AI applications, with features like :

  • Intel Deep Learning Boost – a new, dedicated instruction set for hardware acceleration of neural networks, which will boost applications like automatic image enhancements, photo indexing and photorealistic effects.
  • GPU Engine Compute – developers can use the GPU, which provides up to 1 teraflops of compute capability, for high-throughput inference applications like video stylisation, analytics and real-time video resolution upscaling.
  • Intel Gaussian & Neural Accelerator (GNA) – a dedicated hardware engine for background workloads like voice processing and noise suppression at ultra-low power.

Recommended : 10th Gen Intel Ice Lake Mobile CPU Features + Specifications!

10th Gen Intel Comet Lake

The 10th Gen Intel Comet Lake processors, on the other hand, are an evolution of the last-generation Whiskey Lake processors.

They use the old 14 nm process technology, with these improvements or features :

  • Up to 16% better performance than the last-generation Intel Whiskey Lake processors, never mind 2014 dinosaurs
  • Intel Adaptix technologies – a set of tools that will help Intel’s OEM partners tune their laptop designs for 8% to 12% better performance
  • Support for faster memory – up to DDR4-2666
  • Support for Intel Wi-Fi 6 (Gig+) and Thunderbolt 3 connectivity

Recommended : 10th Gen Intel Comet Lake : 1 Step Forward, 1 Step Back!

 

The 10th Gen Intel Core Processor Number System(s)

Even though they are both part of the same 10th Gen Intel Core processor family, the Ice Lake and Comet Lake processors have different processor number systems.

It’s as if they have two different departments who do not communicate with each other… but I digress. Let’s take a look at their processor number systems, separately.

 

10th Gen Intel Ice Lake Processor Number System

Here is the processor number system for the 10th Gen Intel Ice Lake processors

Brand Modifier

This is what most people think of as the performance category.

  • Core i7 : enthusiast class, with many processing cores
  • Core i5 : mainstream processors
  • Core i3 : entry-level processors

Gen Indicator

This is now a 2-digit number 10 for the 10th Generation Intel Core processor.

SKU Numeric Digits

This is what we consumers use as a rough indicator of the processor’s overall performance.

Instead of three digits that Comet Lake uses, it now uses just two digits, but the concept is the same – the higher the number, the better the processor’s performance in general.

For example, the Core i7-1068 is faster than Core i7-1065.

Level of Graphics

Replacing the Product Line Suffix, this gives us a rough indication of the processor graphics’ performance level.

  • G7 : Intel Iris Plus Graphics with 64 Execution Units
  • G4 : Intel Iris Plus Graphics with 48 Execution Units
  • G1 : Intel UHD Graphics with 32 Execution Units

Intel started using this graphics indicator in the 10th Gen Intel Core processor number system, because this will be a major model differentiator.

For example, they announced three Intel Core i5-1035 models, differentiated only by their processor graphics :

  • Intel Core i5-1035G7 : Intel Iris Pro Graphics (64 EUs)
  • Intel Core i5-1035G4 : Intel Iris Pro Graphics (48 EUs)
  • Intel Core i5-1035G1 : Intel UHD Graphics (32 EUs)

 

10th Gen Intel Comet Lake Processor Number System

Here is the processor number system for the 10th Gen Intel Comet Lake processors

Brand Modifier

This is what most people think of as the performance category.

  • Core i7 : enthusiast class
  • Core i5 : mainstream processors
  • Core i3 : entry-level processors

Gen Indicator

This is now a 2-digit number 10 for the 10th Generation Intel Core processor.

SKU Numeric Digits

This is what we consumers use as a rough indicator of the processor’s overall performance.

Instead of two digits that Ice Lake uses, Comet Lake uses three digits, but the concept is the same – the higher the number, the better the processor’s performance in general.

For example, the Core i7-10710 is faster than Core i7-10510.

Product Line Suffix

This tells us more about the processor features, for a particular model :

  • U : Ultra-low power (mobile only)
  • Y : Extremely-low power (mobile only)

 

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10th Gen Intel Ice Lake Mobile CPU Features + Specifications!

Intel Ice Lake is finally here! Intel just officially launched eleven new 10th Gen Intel Core U-series and Y-series mobile processors!

Here is our primer on the 10th Gen Intel Core mobile processors, codenamed Ice Lake!

 

Intel Ice Lake – 10th Gen, Designed For Thin-And-Light

Codenamed Ice Lake, the 10th Gen Intel Core mobile processors are designed for thin-and-light laptops, including 2-in-1 devices. Here is a quick summary of what’s new…

AI For Mobile Computing

More than just evolutions of previous generations, the 10th Gen Intel Ice Lake mobile processors are the first to be purpose-built for AI in mobile computers. It features :

  • Intel Deep Learning Boost – a new, dedicated instruction set for hardware acceleration of neural networks, which will boost applications like automatic image enhancements, photo indexing and photorealistic effects.
  • GPU Engine Compute – developers can use the GPU, which provides up to 1 teraflops of compute capability, for high-throughput inference applications like video stylisation, analytics and real-time video resolution upscaling.
  • Intel Gaussian & Neural Accelerator (GNA) – a dedicated hardware engine for background workloads like voice processing and noise suppression at ultra-low power.

Greatly Improved Graphics Capability

Some of the 10th Gen Intel Ice Lake mobile processors come with Intel Iris Plus graphics, which deliver double the graphics performance.

Iris Plus graphics will let you game in 1080p, as well as handle 4K video editing and high-resolution photo editing, without the need for a separate GPU.

  • They are the first Intel GPUs to support the VESA Adaptive Sync standard, for a tear-free gaming experience.
  • They are the industry’s first GPU to use variable rate shading for improved rendering performance.
  • They support BT.2020 (also known as Rec. 2020), allowing you to watch 4K HDR video at up to 10 bits of colour.

Recommended : 10th Gen Intel Comet Lake : 1 Step Forward, 1 Step Back!

 

10th Gen Intel Ice Lake Models + Specifications (U Series)

Intel announced six new 10th Gen Intel Ice Lake mobile processors under the U-series, with TDPs of 15 to 28 watts. These are meant for thin-and-light laptops.

10th Gen U-Series Cores / Threads Cache Base Freq Single Core Turbo All Core Turbo Graphics Graphics Max Freq Nominal /
ConfigUP TDP
Intel Core i7-1068G7 4 / 8 8 MB 2.3 GHz 4.1 GHz 3.6 GHz Intel Iris Plus
(64 EUs)
1.10 GHz 28W
Intel Core i7-1065G7 4 / 8 8 MB 1.3 GHz 3.9 GHz 3.5 GHz Intel Iris Plus
(64 EUs)
1.10 GHz 15W / 25W
Intel Core i5-1035G7 4 / 8 6 MB 1.2 GHz 3.7 GHz 3.3 GHz Intel Iris Plus
(64 EUs)
1.05 GHz 15W / 25W
Intel Core i5-1035G4 4 / 8 6 MB 1.1 GHz 3.7 GHz 3.3 GHz Intel Iris Plus
(48 EUs)
1.05 GHz 15W / 25W
Intel Core i5-1035G1 4 / 8 6 MB 1.0 GHz 3.6 GHz 3.3 GHz Intel UHD Graphics
(32 EUs)
1.05 GHz 15W / 25W
Intel Core i3-1005G1 2 / 4 4 MB 1.2 GHz 3.4 GHz 3.4 GHz Intel UHD Graphics
(32 EUs)
0.90 GHz 15W

Recommended : The 10th Gen Intel Core Processor Number Guide!

 

10th Gen Intel Ice Lake Models + Specifications (Y Series)

Intel announced a further five new 10th Gen Intel Ice Lake mobile processors under the Y-series, with TDPs of 9 to 12 watts. These are meant for 2-in-1 laptops.

10th Gen Y-Series Cores / Threads Cache Base Freq Single Core Turbo All Core Turbo Graphics Graphics Max Freq Nominal /
ConfigUP TDP
Intel Core i7-1060G7 4 / 8 8 MB 1.0 GHz 3.8 GHz 3.4 GHz Intel Iris Plus
(64 EUs)
1.10 GHz 9W / 12W
Intel Core i5-1030G7 4 / 8 6 MB 0.8 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.2 GHz Intel Iris Plus
(64 EUs)
1.05 GHz 9W / 12W
Intel Core i5-1030G4 4 / 8 6 MB 0.7 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.2 GHz Intel Iris Plus
(48 EUs)
1.05 GHz 9W / 12W
Intel Core i3-1000G4 2 / 4 4 MB 1.1 GHz 3.2 GHz 3.2 GHz Intel Iris Plus
(48 EUs)
0.90 GHz 9W
Intel Core i3-1000G1 2 / 4 4 MB 1.1 GHz 3.2 GHz 3.2 GHz Intel UHD Graphics
(32 EUs)
0.90 GHz 9W

 

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Here Is The Ryzen R1000 APU That Powers The Atari VCS!

AMD just showed off the Ryzen R1000 APUs, the latest addition to the Ryzen Embedded family. This is the processor that will power by upcoming Atari VCS gaming console!

Here is a quick primer on the new AMD Ryzen R1000 APU!

 

The AMD Ryzen R1000 APU

Known officially as the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000, this APU brings multi-threaded performance for the first time to the low-power R-series of processors.

AMD claims it will offer 3X performance improvement per watt over the last generation, and 4X CPU and graphics performance per dollar advantage over its competition!

It brings to the AMD R-series new features like :

    • Dual-core, quad-threaded Zen processor
    • 3 Vega Graphics Compute Units
    • Low power with ability to run without a fan
    • Supports up to three 4K displays at up to 60 FPS
    • 4K H.265 encode / decode(10b) + VP9 decode capabilities
    • Secure Root of Trust + Secure Run Technology
    • Dual 10G Gigabit Ethernet

Its low power and ability to run fanless makes it suitable for applications like digital displays, high-performance edge computing, networking and thin clients… and yes, gaming consoles!

 

The AMD Ryzen R1000 Will Power The Atari VCS!

AMD quoted a number of Ryzen R1000 customers – Advantech, ASRock Industrial, IBASE, Netronome, Quixant and STRATACACHE. But the biggest name is none other than Atari.

Its ability to deliver multi-threaded processing with an integrated GPU in a fanless package makes it ideal to power the upcoming Atari VCS gaming console.

 

AMD Ryzen R1000 Availability

The AMD Ryzen R1000 will be available Q2 2019 to ODMs and OEMs worldwide. It supports the Mentor Embedded Linux Flex OS which is already available in the market.

 

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