Tag Archives: Processor Graphics

VGA Share Memory Size from The Tech ARP BIOS Guide!

VGA Share Memory Size from The Tech ARP BIOS Guide!

VGA Share Memory Size

Common Options for UMA : 1MB, 4MB, 8MB, 16MB, 32MB, 64MB, 128MB

Common Options for DVMT : 1MB, 8MB

 

VGA Share Memory Size : A Quick Review

The VGA Share Memory Size BIOS feature controls the amount of system memory that is allocated to the integrated graphics processor when the system boots up.

However, its effect depends on whether your motherboard supports the older Unified Memory Architecture (UMA) or the newer Dynamic Video Memory Technology (DVMT).

If you have a motherboard that supports UMA, the memory size you select determines the maximum amount of system memory that is allocated to the graphics processor. Once allocated, it can only be used as graphics memory. It is no longer accessible to the operating system or applications.

Therefore, it is recommended that you select the absolute minimum amount of system memory that the graphics processor requires for your monitor. You can calculate it by multiplying the resolution and colour depth that you are using. Of course, if you intend to play 3D games, you will need to allocate more memory.

If you have a motherboard that supports DVMT, the memory size you select determines the maximum amount of system memory that is pre-allocated to the graphics processor. Once allocated, it can only be used as graphics memory. It is no longer accessible to the operating system or applications.

However, unlike in a UMA system, this memory is only allocated for use during the boot process or with MS-DOS or legacy operating systems. Additional system memory is allocated only after the graphics driver is loaded. It is recommended that you set it to 8MB as this allows for high-resolution splash screens as well as higher resolutions in MS-DOS applications and games.

 

VGA Share Memory Size : The Full Details

Some motherboard chipsets come with an integrated graphics processor. To reduce costs, it usually makes use of UMA (Unified Memory Architecture) or DVMT (Dynamic Video Memory Technology) for its memory requirements.

Both technologies allow the integrated graphics processor to requisition some system memory for use as graphics memory. This reduces cost by obviating the need for dedicated graphics memory. Of course, it has some disadvantages :

  • Allocating system memory to the graphics processor reduces the amount of system memory available for the operating system and programs to use.
  • Sharing system memory with the graphics processor saturates the memory bus and reduces the amount of memory bandwidth for both the processor and the graphics processor.

Therefore, integrated graphics processors are usually unsuitable for high-demand 3D applications and games. They are best used for basic 2D graphics and video functions.

The VGA Share Memory Size BIOS feature controls the amount of system memory that is allocated to the integrated graphics processor when the system boots up.

However, its effect depends on whether your motherboard supports the older Unified Memory Architecture (UMA) or the newer Dynamic Video Memory Technology (DVMT).

If you have a motherboard that supports UMA, the memory size you select determines the maximum amount of system memory that is allocated to the graphics processor. Once allocated, it can only be used as graphics memory. It is no longer accessible to the operating system or applications.

Therefore, it is recommended that you select the absolute minimum amount of system memory that the graphics processor requires for your monitor. You can calculate it by multiplying the resolution and colour depth that you are using.

For example, if you use a resolution of 1600 x 1200 and a colour depth of 32-bits, the amount of graphics memory you require will be 1600 x 1200 x 32-bits = 61,440,000 bits or 7.68 MB.

After doubling that to allow for double buffering, the minimum amount of graphics memory you need would be 15.36 MB. You should set this BIOS feature to 16MB in this example.

Of course, if you intend to play 3D games, you will need to allocate more memory. But please remember that once allocated as graphics memory, it is no longer available to the operating system or applications. You need to balance the performance of your 3D games with that of your operating system and applications.

If you have a motherboard that supports DVMT, the memory size you select determines the maximum amount of system memory that is pre-allocated to the graphics processor. Once allocated, it can only be used as graphics memory. It is no longer accessible to the operating system or applications.

However, unlike in a UMA system, this memory is only allocated for use during the boot process or with MS-DOS or legacy operating systems. Additional system memory is allocated only after the graphics driver is loaded. Therefore, the amount of system memory that can be selected is small – only a choice of 1MB or 8MB.

It is recommended that you set it to 8MB as this allows for high-resolution splash screens as well as higher resolutions in MS-DOS applications and games.

 

Recommended Reading

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The AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Tech Report

AMD just announced the availability of seven Ryzen PRO APU models for the mobile and desktop markets, as well as laptops and desktops featuring these new APUs. Get the full details of the new AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APUs – features, specifications and availability!

 

AMD Raven Ridge

Raven Ridge is AMD’s codename for their Ryzen-Vega APUs (Accelerated Processing Units). First introduced in the mobile segment as the AMD Ryzen Mobile, AMD is now offering PRO versions in both mobile and desktop markets.

These Ryzen APUs combine an AMD Ryzen CPU, with an AMD Radeon Vega GPU, in a single die.

Ryzen CPU + Radeon Vega GPU = Ryzen APU

Mobile APUs are not new. AMD have been making them for years, and Intel mobile processors all come with integrated graphics. But AMD is still the only manufacturer to integrate “premium CPU cores” with “premium graphics cores”.

 

AMD Ryzen PRO APU

The AMD Ryzen PRO desktop processors, revealed in September 2017, were enterprise-grade versions of the first-generation AMD Ryzen 7 and Ryzen 5 processors. A month later, AMD launched the AMD Ryzen Mobile APUs.

However, AMD has not launched any enterprise-grade APU for either the desktop or mobile market… until now, that is. Here are the first seven AMD Ryzen PRO APU models – three for the mobile market, and four for the desktop market.

AMD Ryzen PRO APU (Mobile SKUs)

  • AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 2700U – 4C/8T, 2.2 to 3.8 GHz, Vega 11 Graphics, 15W cTDP
  • AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2500U – 4C/8T, 2.0 to 3.6 GHz, Vega 8 Graphics, 15W cTDP
  • AMD Ryzen 3 PRO 2300U – 4C/4T, 2.0 to 3.4 GHz, Vega 6 Graphics, 15W cTDP

AMD Ryzen PRO APU (Desktop SKUs)

  • AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2400G – 4C/8T, 3.6 to 3.9 GHz, Vega 11 Graphics, 65W TDP
  • AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2400GE – 4C/8T, 3.2 to 3.8 GHz, Vega 11 Graphics, 35W TDP
  • AMD Ryzen 3 PRO 2200G – 4C/4T, 3.5 to 3.7 GHz, Vega 8 Graphics, 65W TDP
  • AMD Ryzen 3 PRO 2200GE – 4C/4T, 3.2 to 3.6 GHz, Vega 8 Graphics, 35W TDP

In this article, we will focus on the Ryzen PRO Mobile APUs. For the AMD Ryzen PRO desktop APUs, we have a separate article – The AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Tech Report.

 

Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Specifications

SpecificationsAMD Ryzen 7 PRO 2700UAMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2500UAMD Ryzen 3 PRO 2300U
CCX Configuration4+04+04+0
CPU Cores444
CPU Threads884
Base Clock2.2 GHz2.0 GHz2.0 GHz
Boost Clock3.8 GHz3.6 GHz3.4 GHz
L1 Cache64 KB instruction cache
32 KB data cache
64 KB instruction cache
32 KB data cache
64 KB instruction cache
32 KB data cache
L2 Cache512 KB x 4512 KB x 4512 KB x 4
L3 Cache4 MB4 MB4 MB
Integrated GPURadeon RX Vega 10
- 640 stream processors
- 40 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1300 MHz
Radeon RX Vega 8
- 512 stream processors
- 32 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1100 MHz
Radeon RX Vega 6
- 384 stream processors
- 24 TMUs, 8 ROPs
- Up to 1100 MHz
Memory SupportUp to DDR4-2400 (Dual Channel)Up to DDR4-2400 (Dual Channel)Up to DDR4-2400 (Dual Channel)
TDP15 W Nominal
12-25 W (Configurable)
15 W Nominal
12-25 W (Configurable)
15 W Nominal
12-25 W (Configurable)

Next Page > AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Key Features

 

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AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Key Features

AMD GuardMI Technology

Even though the Ryzen PRO APU uses the same silicon as its consumer-grade siblings, it has AMD GuardMI Technology enabled.

GuardMI is built into the silicon, which offers OS-agnostic security through :

  • Transparent Secure Memory Encryption – DRAM encryption with minimal performance impact
  • Secure Boot Process – hardware-based root of trust secures the BIOS from power-on
  • Real-Time Intrusion Detection – with support for fTPM and TPM 2.0

 

Enterprise-Grade Reliability

The AMD Ryzen PRO APU will come with enterprise-grade reliability features like :

  • 18 months of planned software stability
  • 24 months of planned processor availability
  • commercial-grade quality-assurance process
  • cherry-picked silicon for long-term reliability and performance
  • supports DASH manageability standard
  • 36-month limited warranty for system manufacturers

 

Single CCX Configuration

Unlike the Summit Ridge-based Ryzen CPUs, the AMD Raven Ridge processors use a single CCX configuration. This is a cost-saving measure with a much smaller die size, that also yield some performance benefits – reduced cache and memory latencies.

 

Precision Boost 2

The AMD Ryzen PRO APU also boasts the improved Precision Boost 2, whose more graceful and linear boost algorithm allows them to “boost more cores, more often, on more workloads“. It is now able to change frequencies in very fine granularity of just 25 MHz.

According to AMD, this will allow the AMD Ryzen PRO APU to perform better with apps that spawn many lightweight threads, as opposed to apps with persistent loads (e.g. video editing and 3D rendering).

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Mobile XFR (mXFR)

Mobile XFR (eXtended Frequency Range) is the automatic overclocking feature that boosts the processor voltage and clock speed beyond the Precision Boost clock speed. It leverages the temperature awareness of Precision Boost 2 to determine how much faster it can overclock.

Like the desktop XFR feature, it is highly dependent on the processor temperature, so a good cooling solution is necessary. Notebooks must have coolers that meet AMD’s performance criteria if they want to offer mXFR.

 

Synergistic Power Rail Sharing

The AMD Ryzen PRO mobile APUs have a unified VDD power rail with digital low-dropout (LDO) regulators. This synergistic power rail sharing allows the maximum current requirements to be reduced by 36%.

They also have multiple digital LDO regions for the CPU cores, graphics core and subregions. This allows those regions to be completely turned off when they are idle, greatly saving power.

The shared voltage regulators not only reduce the total current draw, it allows the Ryzen PRO mobile APU to gain a higher peak CPU and GPU current to boost performance.

Next Page > AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Performance

 

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AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Performance

Let’s take a look at some benchmark results that AMD shared with us.

General Office Productivity

In general office productivity apps, the AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 2700U is about 95% as fast as the Intel Core i7-8550U. The AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2500U, on the other hand, is equivalent to the Intel Core i5-8250U.

Professional Applications

Thanks to the integrated Vega Graphics, the AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APUs shine in professional applications. They are slightly faster in Photoshop, but offer significantly better performance in 3D CAD applications.

Desktop-Class Performance

Despite being a mobile processor, the Ryzen PRO Mobile offers desktop-class performance at a fraction of the power.

Ryzen PRO Mobile vs. 8th Gen Core

AMD shared some benchmarks to show you how the new AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APUs fare against their Intel 8th Gen Core counterparts.

Ryzen PRO Mobile vs. 8th Gen vPro

Here are some benchmarks demonstrating how much faster the new AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APUs again, compared to the Intel 8th Gen vPro counterparts.

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AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Gaming Performance

Even though the AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APUs are “technically” used only for work <wink wink>, the integrated Vega Graphics allow them to double as esports gaming systems! In fact, AMD shares that the AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 2700U is as fast as the Intel Core i7-8550U paired with the NVIDIA GeForce 950M GPU.

Now, the integrated Vega Graphics is not meant to be a true gaming GPU, but it is powerful enough to deliver playable frame rates for these games at 1080p resolution.

Next Page > AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Availability + Slides

 

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AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Availability

The AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APUs (and Ryzen PRO desktop APUs) are already available to OEMs, with AMD announcing the following designs for both SME businesses, as well as enterprises.

 

Suggested Reading

 

AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Slides

Here is the complete set of AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU slides for your perusal.

Go Back To > First PageComputer Hardware & Systems | Home

 

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If you like our work, you can help support our work by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!

The AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Tech Report

AMD just announced the availability of seven Ryzen PRO APU models for the mobile and desktop markets, as well as laptops and desktops featuring these new APUs. Get the full details of the new AMD Ryzen PRO desktop APU – features, specifications and availability!

 

AMD Raven Ridge

Raven Ridge is AMD’s codename for their Ryzen-Vega APUs (Accelerated Processing Units). First introduced in the mobile segment as the AMD Ryzen Mobile, AMD is now offering PRO versions in both mobile and desktop markets.

These Ryzen APUs combine an AMD Ryzen CPU, with an AMD Radeon Vega GPU, in a single die.

Ryzen CPU + Radeon Vega GPU = Ryzen APU

Desktops APUs are not new. AMD have been making them for years, and many Intel desktop processors come with integrated graphics. But AMD is still the only manufacturer to integrate “premium CPU cores” with “premium graphics cores”.

 

AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU

The AMD Ryzen PRO desktop processors, revealed in September 2017, were enterprise-grade versions of the first-generation AMD Ryzen 7 and Ryzen 5 processors. A month later, AMD launched the AMD Ryzen Mobile APUs.

However, AMD has not launched any enterprise-grade APU for either the desktop or mobile market… until now, that is. Here are the first seven AMD Ryzen PRO APU models – three for the mobile market, and four for the desktop market.

AMD Ryzen PRO APU (Mobile SKUs)

  • AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 2700U – 4C/8T, 2.2 to 3.8 GHz, Vega 11 Graphics, 15W cTDP
  • AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2500U – 4C/8T, 2.0 to 3.6 GHz, Vega 8 Graphics, 15W cTDP
  • AMD Ryzen 3 PRO 2300U – 4C/4T, 2.0 to 3.4 GHz, Vega 6 Graphics, 15W cTDP

AMD Ryzen PRO APU (Desktop SKUs)

  • AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2400G – 4C/8T, 3.6 to 3.9 GHz, Vega 11 Graphics, 65W TDP
  • AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2400GE – 4C/8T, 3.2 to 3.8 GHz, Vega 11 Graphics, 35W TDP
  • AMD Ryzen 3 PRO 2200G – 4C/4T, 3.5 to 3.7 GHz, Vega 8 Graphics, 65W TDP
  • AMD Ryzen 3 PRO 2200GE – 4C/4T, 3.2 to 3.6 GHz, Vega 8 Graphics, 35W TDP

In this article, we will focus on the Ryzen PRO desktop APUs. For the AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APUs, we have a separate article – The AMD Ryzen PRO Mobile APU Tech Report.

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Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Specifications

SpecificationsAMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2400GAMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2400GEAMD Ryzen 3 PRO 2200GAMD Ryzen 3 PRO 2200GE
CCX Configuration4+04+04+04+0
CPU Cores4444
CPU Threads8844
Base Clock3.6 GHz3.2 GHz3.5 GHz3.2 GHz
Boost Clock3.9 GHz3.8 GHz3.7 GHz3.6 GHz
L1 Cache64 KB instruction cache
32 KB data cache
64 KB instruction cache
32 KB data cache
64 KB instruction cache
32 KB data cache
64 KB instruction cache
32 KB data cache
L2 Cache512 KB x 4512 KB x 4512 KB x 4512 KB x 4
L3 Cache4 MB4 MB4 MB4 MB
Integrated GPURadeon RX Vega 10
- 640 stream processors
- 40 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1300 MHz
Radeon RX Vega 8
- 512 stream processors
- 32 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1100 MHz
Radeon RX Vega 8
- 512 stream processors
- 32 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1100 MHz
Radeon RX Vega 8
- 512 stream processors
- 32 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1100 MHz
Memory SupportUp to DDR4-2933 (Dual Channel)Up to DDR4-2933 (Dual Channel)Up to DDR4-2933 (Dual Channel)Up to DDR4-2933 (Dual Channel)
TDP65 W35 W65 W35 W

Next Page > AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Key Features

 

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If you like our work, you can help support our work by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!

AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Key Features

AMD GuardMI Technology

Even though the Ryzen PRO APU uses the same silicon as its consumer-grade siblings, it has AMD GuardMI Technology enabled.

GuardMI is built into the silicon, which offers OS-agnostic security through :

  • Transparent Secure Memory Encryption – DRAM encryption with minimal performance impact
  • Secure Boot Process – hardware-based root of trust secures the BIOS from power-on
  • Real-Time Intrusion Detection – with support for fTPM and TPM 2.0

 

Enterprise-Grade Reliability

The AMD Ryzen PRO APU will come with enterprise-grade reliability features like :

  • 18 months of planned software stability
  • 24 months of planned processor availability
  • commercial-grade quality-assurance process
  • cherry-picked silicon for long-term reliability and performance
  • supports DASH manageability standard
  • 36-month limited warranty for system manufacturers

 

Single CCX Configuration

Unlike the Summit Ridge-based Ryzen CPUs, the AMD Raven Ridge processors use a single CCX configuration. This is a cost-saving measure with a much smaller die size, that also yield some performance benefits – reduced cache and memory latencies.

 

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Smaller L3 Cache

Using a single CCX configuration halves the Raven Ridge L3 cache size from 8 MB to 4 MB. To compensate, AMD increased their base and boost clock speeds.

 

New CPU Package

The Raven Ridge APUs also introduce a revised CPU package, and a switch to the traditional non-metallic TIM (thermal interface material). These are again cost-cutting measures, albeit with a side benefit of allowing the Raven Ridge processors to officially support DDR4-2933 memory.

 

Precision Boost 2

The AMD Ryzen PRO APU also boasts the improved Precision Boost 2, whose more graceful and linear boost algorithm allows them to “boost more cores, more often, on more workloads“. It is now able to change frequencies in very fine granularity of just 25 MHz.

According to AMD, this will allow the AMD Ryzen PRO APU to perform better with apps that spawn many lightweight threads, as opposed to apps with persistent loads (e.g. video editing and 3D rendering).

 

PCIe x8 For Discrete GPU

The Summit Ridge-based AMD Ryzen 7, Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 3 processors have 16 PCI Express 3.0 lanes dedicated to the PCIe graphics card. In Raven Ridge, that gets cut down to half. That means any external graphics card will only communicate with a Raven Ridge processor at PCIe x8 speed.

This is a cost-saving measure, making the Raven Ridge processor simpler and cheaper to produce. AMD also claims that the move contributed to a smaller and more efficient uncore.

Next Page > AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Performance & Availability

 

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AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Performance

We haven’t had the opportunity to benchmark these desktop APUs, but they should perform similarly to the consumer-grade Raven Ridge desktop APUs we reviewed earlier :

Let’s take a look at some benchmark results that AMD shared with us.

General Office Productivity

In general office productivity apps, the AMD Ryzen PRO 5 2400G was just under 90% as fast as the Intel Core i5-8400. The AMD Ryzen PRO 3 2200G, on the other hand, was slightly faster than the Intel Core i3-8100.

Professional Applications

Thanks to the integrated Vega Graphics, the AMD Ryzen PRO desktop APUs shine in professional applications. The AMD Ryzen PRO 5 2400G performed up to 2.8X faster than the Intel Core i5-8400. The AMD Ryzen PRO 3 2200G, on the other hand, was up to 2X faster than the Intel Core i3-8100.

 

AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Availability

The AMD Ryzen PRO desktop APUs (and Ryzen PRO Mobile APUs) are already available to OEMs, with AMD announcing the following designs for both SME businesses, as well as enterprises.

 

Suggested Reading

Next Page > AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Slides

 

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If you like our work, you can help support our work by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!

AMD Ryzen PRO Desktop APU Slides

Here is the complete set of AMD Ryzen PRO desktop APU slides for your perusal.

 

Suggested Reading

Go Back To > First PageComputer Hardware & Systems | Home

 

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If you like our work, you can help support our work by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!

AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro Details + Specifications Leaked!

AMD is almost as leaky as the Trump Administration. In recent months, we shared with you the leaked Ryzen 2 details, leaked Ryzen 2 specifications, and even the leaked Ryzen 7 2700X and Ryzen 5 2600 benchmarks. Now, let us share with you the leaked details and specifications of the AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro processors!

 

AMD Ryzen Mobile

Remember the AMD Ryzen Mobile? That’s the mobile version of the Ryzen (Raven Ridge) desktop APUs. It combines a Ryzen CPU and a small Radeon Vega GPU.

The AMD Ryzen Mobile is great for light and thin laptops, but let’s be frank – it’s pretty worthless for serious gaming.

 

AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro

Remember the 8th Generation Intel Core processor with Radeon RX Vega graphics? It’s a Multi-Chip Module (MCM) that combines an 8th Generation Intel Core-H mobile processor, with a customised Radeon GPU and HBM2 memory.

The AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro is a further development of that. When Intel developed that MCM with AMD, it was with the understanding that AMD would introduce their own version eventually – the AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro.

The AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro is based on the same combination of a CPU and a GPU with HBM2 memory, and the Embedded Multi-Die Interconnect Bridge (EMIB).

Good news – AMD is calling the Ryzen Mobile Pro an APU (Accelerated Processing Unit), and not another acronym. But if they’re looking for suggestions – may we suggest Advanced Gaming Processor (AGP)? 😉

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The AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro Specifications

AMD will introduce four Ryzen Mobile Pro APUs:

  • AMD Ryzen 7 3800P (8C/16T, 48 CUs)
  • AMD Ryzen 5 3600P (6C/12T, 40 CUs)
  • AMD Ryzen 3 3400P (4C/8T, 40 CUs)
  • AMD Ryzen 3 3300P (4C/8T, 24 CUs)

It’s based on the same Zen+ microarchitecture and 12 nm LP process as the 2nd Generation AMD Ryzen processors, so they should all have 512 KB L2 cache per core, and a 16 MB L3 cache.

 

How Fast Is AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro?

Lofty claims indeed! AMD either smoked a ton of pot, or the Ryzen Mobile Pro is going to take over the mobile gaming world by storm!

Next Page > Availability + Leaked Photo + Complete Slides

 

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AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro Availability

According to this slide, AMD plans to introduce in the second half of 2018.

Here is a shot of a prototype AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro APU on a test motherboard.

 

The AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro Presentation Slides

Here are all of the leaked AMD Ryzen Mobile Pro presentation slides for your perusal. We also created a video of these leaked slides :

 

Suggested Reading

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DVMT Mode from The Tech ARP BIOS Guide

DVMT Mode

Common Options : Fixed, DVMT, Both

 

Quick Review of DVMT Mode

Unified Memory Architecture (UMA) is a concept whereby system memory is shared by both CPU and graphics processor. While this reduces cost, it also reduces the system’s performance by taking up a large portion of memory for the graphics processor.

Intel’s Dynamic Video Memory Technology (DVMT) takes that concept further by allowing the system to dynamically allocate memory resources according to the demands of the system at any point in time. The key idea in DVMT is to improve the efficiency of the memory allocated to either system or graphics processor.

The BIOS feature that controls all this is the DVMT Mode BIOS feature. It allows you to select the DVMT operating mode.

When set to Fixed, the graphics driver will reserve a fixed portion of the system memory as graphics memory. This ensures that the graphics processor has a guaranteed amount of graphics memory but the downside is once allocated, this memory cannot be used by the operating system even when it is not in use.

When set to DVMT, the graphics chip will dynamically allocate system memory as graphics memory, according to system and graphics requirements. The system memory is allocated as graphics memory when graphics-intensive applications are running but when the need for graphics memory drops, the allocated graphics memory can be released to the operating system for other uses.

When set to Both, the graphics driver will allocate a fixed amount of memory as dedicated graphics memory, as well as allow more system memory to be dynamically allocated between the graphics processor and the operating system.

It is recommended that you set this BIOS feature to DVMT for maximum performance. Setting it to DVMT ensures that system memory is dynamically allocated for optimal balance between graphics and system performance.

 

Details of DVMT Mode

Unified Memory Architecture (UMA) is a concept whereby system memory is shared by both CPU and graphics processor. While this reduces cost, it also reduces the system’s performance by taking up a large portion of memory for the graphics processor.

Intel’s Dynamic Video Memory Technology (DVMT) takes that concept further by allowing the system to dynamically allocate memory resources according to the demands of the system at any point in time. The key idea in DVMT is to improve the efficiency of the memory allocated to either system or graphics processor.

To ensure better allocation of system memory, DVMT comes with three different operating modes :

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  • Fixed Memory
  • DVMT Memory
  • Fixed + DVMT Memory

But before we go into the details of each mode, it’s important to note that the system boots up with some system memory pre-allocated for graphics, irrespective of the DVMT operating mode. Depending on the motherboard manufacturer, you may or may not be allowed to select between a choice of 1MB or 8MB of pre-allocated memory.

This pre-allocated memory is dedicated to VGA/SVGA graphics and will be treated by the operating system as dedicated graphics memory. This pre-allocated memory will not be visible or accessible to the operating system. It will be used during the booting process to display the boot and splash screens, or when you run MS-DOS games and applications. It will also be used when Windows XP loads in Safe Mode.

Once an operating system with the appropriate Intel Graphics Media Accelerator Driver loads up, the graphics processor reclaims the pre-allocated memory for its use. But again, it is only available for use as graphics memory. It will never be made available to the operating system or applications. The Intel GMA driver then loads additional system memory according to the DVMT operating mode.

The Fixed Memory operating mode reserves a fixed amount of system memory as graphics memory. This is in addition to the memory already pre-allocated. Like pre-allocated memory, this fixed amount is no longer available to the operating system. But when the operating system reports the total system memory, it will include this amount, as opposed to pre-allocated memory.

The DVMT Memory operating mode allows the graphics driver to dynamically allocate system memory for use by the graphics processor. When no graphics-intensive operations are occuring, most of the DVMT memory can be reallocated to the operating system for other uses. When more graphics memory is required, the graphics driver will automatically reallocate more system memory for use as graphics memory.

The Fixed + DVMT Memory operating mode is an combination of the Fixed and DVMT operating modes. It allows you to allocate a fixed amount of reserved graphics memory (over the minimum pre-allocated amount), as well as a portion of system memory that can be dynamically allocated to both graphics processor and operating system.

This figure from Intel clearly shows the differences between the three different DVMT operating modes :

The BIOS feature that controls all this is the DVMT Mode BIOS feature. It allows you to select the DVMT operating mode.

When set to Fixed, the graphics driver will reserve a fixed portion of the system memory as graphics memory. This ensures that the graphics processor has a guaranteed amount of graphics memory.

But the downside is, once allocated, this memory cannot be used by the operating system even when it is not in use. Usually, the following configuration scheme is used :

System Memory DVMT Graphics Memory
Pre-Allocated Fixed Total
128 – 255 MB 1 MB 31 MB 32 MB
8 MB 24 MB
256 – 511 MB 1 MB 63 MB 64 MB
8 MB 56 MB
1 MB 127 MB 128 MB
8 MB 120 MB
512 MB and larger 1 MB 63 MB 64 MB
8 MB 56 MB
1 MB 127 MB 128 MB
8 MB 120 MB

When set to DVMT, the graphics chip will dynamically allocate system memory as graphics memory, according to system and graphics requirements. The system memory is allocated as graphics memory when graphics-intensive applications are running.

But when the need for graphics memory drops, the allocated graphics memory can be released to the operating system for other uses. Usually, the following configuration scheme is used :

System Memory DVMT Graphics Memory
Pre-Allocated Fixed Total
128 – 255 MB 1 MB 31 MB 32 MB
8 MB 24 MB
256 – 511 MB 1 MB 63 MB 64 MB
8 MB 56 MB
1 MB 127 MB 128 MB
8 MB 120 MB
1 MB 159 MB 160 MB
8 MB 152 MB
512 MB and larger 1 MB 63 MB 64 MB
8 MB 56 MB
1 MB 127 MB 128 MB
8 MB 120 MB
1 MB 223 MB 224 MB
8 MB 216 MB

When set to Both, the graphics driver will allocate a fixed amount of memory as dedicated graphics memory, as well as allow more system memory to be dynamically allocated between the graphics processor and the operating system. Usually, the following configuration scheme is used :

System Memory DVMT Graphics Memory
Pre-Allocated Fixed Total
128 – 255 MB NA
256 and larger 1 MB 63 MB + 64 MB 128 MB
8 MB 56 MB + 64 MB

It is recommended that you set this BIOS feature to DVMT for maximum performance. Setting it to DVMT ensures that system memory is dynamically allocated for optimal balance between graphics and system performance.

Go Back To > The Tech ARP BIOS Guide | Home

 

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The Intel Cannon Lake Processor Details Leaked!

During our continuing coverage of Meltdown and Spectre, we noticed that Intel accidentally leaked details of their upcoming 10 nm Cannon Lake processors. Let’s take a look at what we found!

 

The Intel Cannon Lake Processor

Cannon Lake is the long-delayed 10 nm die shrink of the Intel Kaby Lake microarchitecture. Originally slated for release in 2016, Intel delayed it in favour of another 14 nm process refinement with the Intel Coffee Lake processors.

In addition to a die shrink that would allow it to deliver better performance with lower power consumption and thermal output, the Cannon Lake processors will also boast the AVX-512 instruction set.

At CES 2018, Intel announced that they have already started shipping mobile Cannon Lake processors to their partners, with a production ramp-up in 2018. So we know for sure Cannon Lake will finally see the light of day in 2018.

 

What Intel Leaked On Cannon Lake

In their second Spectre 2 microcode update schedule, Intel accidentally released references to two Cannon Lake-U (CNL-U) processors.

The shorthand numbers appear to indicate that :

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  • they are ultra-low power mobile processors, with a 15 W TDP
  • the (2+2) model is a dual-core processor with an Intel GT2 integrated graphics
  • the (2+0) model is a dual-core processor without integrated graphics

The (2+0) model is interesting because it’s the first U-grade Intel mobile processor to not come with integrated graphics.

Is this meant to be used in applications that do not require displays, like a NAS? Could it possibly be used in an MCM package with Radeon Graphics? Or is this a higher-performance part to be paired with discrete graphics options from AMD or NVIDIA?

 

Cannon Lake Availability

Intel was not specific about when exactly they will launch these mobile Cannon Lake processors, but we can glean some details from their leaked microcode update schedule.

We can see that the Cannon Lake BIOS is currently in beta testing. So a Q1 launch is unlikely, but a Q2 launch is most definitely on the table. In fact, we think that its launch got delayed after the Intel Spectre 2 reboot issue.

Intel probably delayed its official launch until they can make sure they have a fully-patched BIOS. It wouldn’t be good PR to launch the Cannon Lake processors, without being able to claim that they’re fully-protected against Meltdown and Spectre.

 

They’re Vulnerable To Meltdown + Spectre?

Yes, the Cannon Lake processors are all vulnerable to Meltdown and Spectre. These processors were taped out long ago. It was the Intel 10 nm process technology that was not sufficiently mature, not the Cannon Lake design.

Only the next-generation Intel Ice Lake processors, which features a new microarchitecture, will no longer be vulnerable to Meltdown and Spectre.

 

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The AMD Raven Ridge Desktop APU Tech Report Rev. 3.0

At CES 2018, AMD announced the AMD Raven Ridge desktop processors – the long-awaited AMD Ryzen APUs. They are basically AMD Ryzen processors with AMD Radeon Vega graphics built-in. We can now share with you the full details and our reviews of the AMD Raven Ridge desktop APUs!

Updated @ 2018-02-13 : Added the AMD Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G review links. Updated various parts of the article.

Updated @ 2018-02-10 : Added two new sections on the new CPU package, L3 cache, PCI Express lanes, and Precision Boost 2. Also updated the section on the Single CCX Configuration.

Originally posted @ 2018-02-08

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The AMD Raven Ridge Desktop APU Reviews

Here are the reviews of the new AMD Raven Ridge desktop APUs.

 

The AMD Raven Ridge Desktop APUs

Raven Ridge is AMD’s codename for their Ryzen-Vega APUs (Accelerated Processing Units). First introduced in the mobile segment as the AMD Ryzen Mobile, AMD is now introducing them to the desktop market.

The new Ryzen APUs combine an AMD Ryzen CPU, with an AMD Radeon Vega GPU, in a single die.

AMD Ryzen CPU + AMD Radeon Vega GPU = AMD Ryzen APU

Desktops APUs are not new. AMD have been making them for years, and many Intel desktop processors come with integrated graphics. But AMD is still the only manufacturer to integrate “premium CPU cores” with “premium graphics cores” to deliver gaming for the masses with :

  • 1080p HD+ gaming performance without a discrete graphics card
  • support for Radeon FreeSync, Radeon Chill, Enhanced Sync and Radeon ReLive

 

Single CCX Configuration

Unlike the Summit Ridge-based Ryzen CPUs, the AMD Raven Ridge processors use a single CCX configuration. This is a cost-saving measure with a much smaller die size, that also yield some performance benefits – reduced cache and memory latencies.

AMD analysed the performance of the 2+2 and 4+0 configuration and concluded that they are “roughly equivalent on average across 50+ games“.

 

Smaller L3 Cache

Using a single CCX configuration halves the Raven Ridge L3 cache size from 8 MB to 4 MB. To compensate, AMD increased their base and boost clock speeds, particularly in the Ryzen 5 2400G.

 

New CPU Package

The Raven Ridge APUs also introduce a revised CPU package, and a switch to the traditional non-metallic TIM (thermal interface material). These are again cost-cutting measures, albeit with a side benefit of allowing the Raven Ridge processors to officially support DDR4-2933 memory.

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Precision Boost 2

The new Raven Ridge processors also boast the improved Precision Boost 2, whose more graceful and linear boost algorithm allows them to “boost more cores, more often, on more workloads“. It is now able to change frequencies in very fine granularity of just 25 MHz.

According to AMD, this will allow the Raven Ridge processors to perform better with apps and games that spawn many lightweight threads, as opposed to apps with persistent loads (e.g. video editing and 3D rendering).

 

PCIe x8 For Discrete GPU

The Summit Ridge-based AMD Ryzen 7, Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 3 processors have 16 PCI Express 3.0 lanes dedicated to the PCIe graphics card. In Raven Ridge, that gets cut down to half. That means any external graphics card will only communicate with a Raven Ridge processor at PCIe x8 speed.

This is a cost-saving measure, making the Raven Ridge processor simpler and cheaper to produce. The Ryzen 3 2200G, for example, is $10 cheaper than its predecessor, the Ryzen 3 1200. They also claim that the move contributed to a smaller and more efficient uncore.

AMD made this decision because “abundant public data has shown that this is a neutral change for the midrange GPUs and workloads likely to be paired with a $99-169 processor“.

Frankly, the Raven Ridge is best used as-is. If you plan to use a discrete graphics card, it makes far more sense to get the Summit Ridge-based AMD Ryzen 7, Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 3 processors instead.

Next Page > Unboxing Raven Ridge, Specifications, Price & Availability

 

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The AMD Ryzen 2000G Series APUs Revealed!

As announced at CES 2018, AMD is introducing two Raven Ridge desktop processors as part of the new AMD Ryzen 2000G family – the AMD Ryzen 5 2400G, and the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G.

AMD kindly sent us their Raven Ridge desktop processor media kit, which we unboxed in this video :

 

The AMD Raven Ridge Desktop APU Specification Comparison

For your convenience, we created this table that compares their key specifications with those of their CPU-equivalents – the AMD Ryzen 5 1400 and the AMD Ryzen 3 1200.

SpecificationsAMD Ryzen 5 2400GAMD Ryzen 5 1400AMD Ryzen 3 1200AMD Ryzen 3 2200G
TDP65 W65 W65 W65 W
SocketAM4AM4AM4AM4
Process Technology14 nm FinFET14 nm FinFET14 nm FinFET14 nm FinFET
Transistor Count4.94 Billion4.8 Billion4.8 Billion4.94 Billion
Die Size209.78 mm²192 mm²192 mm²209.78 mm²
CCX Configuration4+02+22+24+0
Processor Cores4444
Number of Simultaneous Threads8844
L2 Cache Size2 MB2 MB2 MB2 MB
L3 Cache Size4 MB8 MB8 MB4 MB
Base Clock Speed3.6 GHz3.2 GHz3.1 GHz3.5 GHz
Boost Clock Speed3.9 GHz3.4 GHz3.4 GHz3.7 GHz
Max. DDR4 SpeedDDR4-2933DDR4-2667DDR4-2667DDR4-2933
GPURadeon RX Vega 11
- 704 stream processors
- 44 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1250 MHz
NoneNoneRadeon Vega 8
- 512 stream processors
- 32 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1100 MHz
PCI Express LanesPCIe x8PCIe x16PCIe x16PCIe x8
Bundled CPU CoolerAMD Wraith StealthAMD Wraith StealthAMD Wraith StealthAMD Wraith Stealth
Launch PriceUS$ 169US$ 169US$ 109US$ 99

 

AMD Raven Ridge Price & Availability

The AMD Raven Ridge desktop APUs are available for purchase starting 12 February 2018, at the following prices :

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  • AMD Ryzen 5 2400G (review) : $169 | RM 759 (inclusive of 6% GST)
  • AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (review) : $99 | RM 479 (inclusive of 6% GST)

At those price points, these Raven Ridge APUs will literally shred Intel processors with integrated graphics to pieces with their value proposition. More cores and more threads, with a much faster graphics core, at such prices. What more can you ask for?

The AMD Raven Ridge desktop APUs will be a relief to many esports gamers, who are suffering from extremely high GPU prices because of cryptocurrency miners.

 

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AMD Ryzen 3 2200G With Radeon Vega 8 Graphics Review

AMD announced the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G with Radeon Vega 8 Graphics at CES 2018, and now it is finally here!. Today, we will share with you our review of the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G APU, and its integrated Radeon Vega 8 Graphics!

 

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G Specifications Compared

We created this table to compare the specifications of the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) and AMD Ryzen 5 2400G (Price Check) APUs, against the AMD Ryzen 5 1400 and AMD Ryzen 3 1200 CPUs, that they will replace.

SpecificationsAMD Ryzen 5 2400GAMD Ryzen 5 1400AMD Ryzen 3 1200AMD Ryzen 3 2200G
TDP65 W65 W65 W65 W
SocketAM4AM4AM4AM4
Process Technology14 nm FinFET14 nm FinFET14 nm FinFET14 nm FinFET
Transistor Count4.94 Billion4.8 Billion4.8 Billion4.94 Billion
Die Size209.78 mm²192 mm²192 mm²209.78 mm²
CCX Configuration4+02+22+24+0
Processor Cores4444
Number of Simultaneous Threads8844
L2 Cache Size2 MB2 MB2 MB2 MB
L3 Cache Size4 MB8 MB8 MB4 MB
Base Clock Speed3.6 GHz3.2 GHz3.1 GHz3.5 GHz
Boost Clock Speed3.9 GHz3.4 GHz3.4 GHz3.7 GHz
Max. DDR4 SpeedDDR4-2933DDR4-2667DDR4-2667DDR4-2933
GPURadeon RX Vega 11
- 704 stream processors
- 44 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1250 MHz
NoneNoneRadeon Vega 8
- 512 stream processors
- 32 TMUs, 16 ROPs
- Up to 1100 MHz
PCI Express LanesPCIe x8PCIe x16PCIe x16PCIe x8
Bundled CPU CoolerAMD Wraith StealthAMD Wraith StealthAMD Wraith StealthAMD Wraith Stealth
Launch PriceUS$ 169US$ 169US$ 109US$ 99

 

Unboxing The AMD Ryzen 5 2400G

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G with Radeon Vega 8 Graphics (Price Check) comes bundled with an AMD Wraith Stealth cooler. Let’s unbox it, and see what we find inside!

Here is what you will find inside the box :

  • The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G APU (Price Check)
  • A pair of Ryzen and Radeon case badges
  • The AMD Wraith Stealth cooler
  • A set of AMD CPU installation guide, and motherboard compatibility note

Next Page > Key Features Of The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G

 

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The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G APU Up Close!

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G with Radeon Vega 8 Graphics (Price Check) has four Ryzen processor cores with a 3.5 GHz base clock, and a 3.7 GHz boost clock. It does not support SMT (simultaneous multi-threading), so it can only handle 4 threads simultaneously.

It uses a single CCX (CPU Complex), allowing AMD to fit a Radeon GPU on the same die. Its transistor count only increased by 3% to 4.94 billion, with a 9% larger die size of 209.78 mm².

 

Single CCX Configuration

Unlike the Summit Ridge-based Ryzen CPUs, the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) uses a single CCX configuration. This is a cost-saving measure that yields a much smaller die size, with some performance benefits – reduced cache and memory latencies.

AMD analysed the performance of the 2+2 and 4+0 configurations, and concluded that they are “roughly equivalent on average across 50+ games“.

 

Smaller L3 Cache

Using a single CCX configuration has the unfortunate effect of halving the L3 cache size from 8 MB to 4 MB. AMD increased its base and boost clock speeds to compensate for the smaller L3 cache.

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G has a 400 MHz (13%) higher base clock and a 300 MHz (9%) higher boost clock than the Ryzen 3 1200 it replaces.

 

New CPU Package

The Raven Ridge APUs also introduce a revised CPU package, and a switch to the traditional non-metallic TIM (thermal interface material). These are again cost-cutting measures, albeit with a side benefit of allowing the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) to officially support DDR4-2933 memory.

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Precision Boost 2

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) supports the improved Precision Boost 2, whose more graceful and linear boost algorithm allows them to “boost more cores, more often, on more workloads“. It can change frequencies in very fine granularity of just 25 MHz.

According to AMD, this will allow the Raven Ridge processors to perform better with apps and games that spawn many lightweight threads, as opposed to apps with persistent loads (e.g. video editing and 3D rendering).

 

PCIe x8 For Discrete GPU

The Summit Ridge-based AMD Ryzen 7, Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 3 processors have 16 PCI Express 3.0 lanes dedicated to the PCIe graphics card. The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) only has half that – 8 PCIe lanes. That means any external graphics card will only communicate with it at PCIe x8 speed.

This is a cost-saving measure, although AMD also claims that the move contributed to a smaller and more efficient uncore. According to AMD, this is unlikely to make a significant difference with the type of (mid-range) graphics cards this processor will usually be paired with.

 

AMD Wraith Stealth

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) is bundled with the AMD Wraith Stealth cooler. This is a basic CPU cooler, so don’t expect LED or RGB lighting, a copper base or even heatpipes.

The Wraith Stealth cooler uses a simple, low-profile aluminium heatsink, with a new spring-screw clamping system. Its main advantage – it’s quiet with a maximum noise level of 28 dBa.

Next Page > 3D Rendering, Video Transcoding & Photoshop Performance

 

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Benchmarking The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G

In this review, we will take a look at the work and gaming performance of the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G APU. In the CPU tests, we will compare it to the AMD Ryzen 5 2400G (Price Check), as well as the AMD Ryzen 5 1500X (Price Check) and the AMD Ryzen 3 1300X (Price Check).

AMD Ryzen 5 1500X AMD Ryzen 5 2400G AMD Ryzen 3 1300X AMD Ryzen 3 2200G
Cores / Threads 4 / 8 4 / 8 4 / 4 4 / 4
Base Clock 3.5 GHz 3.6 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.5 GHz
Boost Clock 3.7 GHz 3.9 GHz 3.7 GHz 3.7 GHz
L2 Cache 2 MB 2 MB 2 MB 2 MB
L3 Cache 16 MB 4 MB 8 MB 4 MB
Memory Speed DDR4-2666 DDR4-2933 DDR4-2666 DDR4-2933
Current Price US$ 189 US$ 169 US$ 129 US$ 99

In the graphics tests, we will compare it to the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Price Check), and the AMD Radeon RX 460 (Price Check) graphics cards. The graphics drivers used were the NVIDIA GeForce 390.77 and the AMD Radeon Software 17.7.

 

3D Rendering Speed – CINEBENCH R15

CINEBENCH R15 is a real-world 3D rendering benchmark based on the MAXON Cinema 4D animation software. This is a great way to accurately determine the actual performance of a processor in 3D content creation.

CINEBENCH R15 Single Core

This Single Core test is not reflective of real world performance, but it is useful to find out the performance of the individual core.

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) has the same clock speeds as the Ryzen 3 1300X (Price Check), but was 12.4% slower in single-core performance. This shows just how much effect the larger L3 cache has on performance.

CINEBENCH R15 Multi Core

The Multi-Core test shows the processor’s real-world 3D rendering performance.

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) did well in the Multi Core test, coming in only 6% slower than the Ryzen 3 1300X (Price Check), and just 24% slower than the Ryzen 5 2400G (Price Check).

CINEBENCH R15 MP Ratio

The analysis of the Multi-Processing Ratio is useful in checking the efficiency of the SMT implementation. The MP Ratio is independent of the processor’s clock speed.

It looks like the Raven Ridge microarchitecture does indeed have reduced latencies, thanks to the use of a single CCX.

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Video Transcoding Speed – HandBrake

HandBrake is a free, open-source video transcoding utility. Video transcoding basically converts a video file from one resolution / format to another. As you can imagine, it’s very compute-intensive. In our test, we converted a 4K video of 1.3 GB in size into a 1080p video (HQ1080p30).

Despite its clock speed advantage, the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) was 12% slower than the Ryzen 3 1300X (Price Check) at video transcoding. This is due to the much smaller L3 cache size.

 

Radial Blur Speed – Photoshop CC 14

The radial blur filter adds the perception of motion to a picture. This is a compute-intensive operation that benefits from multiple processing cores. This radial blur test was performed on a single 13.5 megapixel photo, with a filesize of 4,910,867 bytes.

Again, the smaller L3 cache size reduced its performance by 6% compared to the Ryzen 3 1300X (Price Check).

Next Page > The 3DMark & Ashes of the Singularity Performance Results

 

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3DMark – FireStrike (1920 x 1080)

In the 3DMark FireStrike benchmark that runs at 1920 x 1080, the Radeon Vega 8 core of the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) delivered a Graphics Score of just over 2700. This makes it less than half as fast as the AMD Radeon RX 460 (Price Check).

 

3DMark – FireStrike Extreme (2560 x 1440)

When we bumped up the resolution to 2560 x 1440, the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G delivered a Graphics Score of just 1220 – 12% slower than the Ryzen 5 2400G (Price Check).

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Ashes of the Singularity (1080p)

In the RTS game, Ashes of the Singularity, the single core CPU performance has a significant effect on the actual frame rate. We tested the cards using the Low setting preset.

At the resolution of 1920 x 1080, the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) delivered a frame rate just under 25 fps. This was with the quality set to Low. So gamers will want to drop the resolution to 720p to get a decent frame rate.

 

Ashes of the Singularity (1440p)

We then bumped up the resolution to 2560 x 1440, again with the settings set to Low.

At 1440p, the average frame rate of the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) dropped by 12%.

Next Page > Warhammer & For Honor Performance Results

 

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Total War: Warhammer (1080p)

Like Ashes of the Singularity, the single core performance appears to be crucial in Total War: Warhammer.

At 1080p, the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) delivered a playable average frame rate of 37 fps. However, note that the quality settings were set to Low.

 

Total War: Warhammer (1440p)

We then bumped up the resolution 1440p to see how they fare, again with the quality settings set to Low.

1440p was just too hard for the Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) to handle. The average frame rate of 22.5 fps is just too low to be playable.

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For Honor (1080p)

We started out testing For Honor using the Low settings, which means Trilinear Filtering and no Anti-Aliasing.

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) was able to deliver a playable frame rate, which averages out at 35 fps. This makes it about ⅓ as fast as the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Price Check) graphics card.

 

For Honor (1080p)

We then increase the resolution to 2560 x 1440, still using the Low settings.

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) was definitely not powerful enough to handle the increased workload, with an average frame rate of only 21.5 fps.

Next Page > Our Verdict, Price & Availability, Suggested Reading

 

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Our Verdict

First off, it bears reminding that the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) is an APU – basically a quad-core processor, with built-in AMD Vega graphics. Even with the added graphics capability, AMD actually made the Ryzen 3 2200G cheaper than the Ryzen 3 1200 CPU it replaces.

AMD achieved this by using half of a Summit Ridge processor die, allowing 8 Vega Compute Units to be inserted with a slight bump in transistor count and die size. This clever bit of engineering compromise, and a number of other tweaks, allowed them to keep costs low.

The biggest problem with the decision to use a single CCX – the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) only has a 4 MB L3 cache – half that of the Ryzen 3 1200 CPU it replaces. AMD increased its clock speed to compensate, actually making the Ryzen 3 2200G equivalent to the Ryzen 3 1300X (Price Check) on paper.

As our benchmark results show, the Ryzen 3 2200G was 6-12% slower than the Ryzen 3 1300X. But that’s really okay, because the 1300X is 23% more expensive at $129!

When it comes to games, AMD promised that it will deliver “1080 HD+ gaming performance“. That may be true for less strenuous esports games like Dota 2. In the games we tested, its Radeon Vega 8 graphics core can only deliver playable frame rates at 1080p if we use the lowest possible quality settings.

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Make no mistake – the Radeon Vega 8 processor graphics is no replacement for a good graphics card, like AMD’s own Radeon RX Vega 64 and Radeon RX Vega 56.

So what is the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G really good for? We see it being used mostly in small form-factor esports gaming PCs. It offers decent CPU and gaming performance for games like Dota 2, League of Legends and CS:GO in a single, highly-affordable and power-efficient package.

Remember – the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) offers 4-core CPU performance, with faster than average processor graphics, for just 65 watts of power consumption.

If you are looking to play games with all of the bells and whistles enabled, you need to opt for a dedicated graphics card. But if you are a casual gamer, or just want a really affordable and power-efficient esports gaming system (looking at you esports cafe owners!), it’s hard to beat the value proposition of the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check).

Mark our words – the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G is going to shred Intel processors with integrated graphics to pieces.

 

The AMD Ryzen 3 2200G Price & Availability

As AMD announced, the AMD Ryzen 3 2200G (Price Check) desktop APU will be available starting 12 February 2018.

It is priced at just US$99 (RM 479 in Malaysia), making it an affordable gaming solution. This will be a relief to many esports gamers, who are suffering from extremely high GPU prices because of cryptocurrency miners.

You can help support Tech ARP by ordering your AMD Ryzen 3 2200G from this Amazon link.

 

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FIXED Memory Size – The Tech ARP BIOS Guide

FIXED Memory Size

Common Options : 0 MB, 32 MB, 64 MB, 128 MB

 

Quick Review of FIXED Memory Size

Unified Memory Architecture (UMA) is a concept whereby system memory is shared by both CPU and graphics processor. While this reduces cost, it also reduces the system’s performance by taking up a large portion of memory for the graphics processor.

Intel’s Dynamic Video Memory Technology (DVMT) takes that concept further by allowing the system to dynamically allocate memory resources according to the demands of the system at any point in time. The key idea in DVMT is to improve the efficiency of the memory allocated to either system or graphics processor.

The FIXED Memory Size BIOS feature is used in conjunction with the DVMT Memory Size BIOS feature to select the operating mode as well as the maximum amount of graphics memory that can be allocated to the onboard graphics processor.

When DVMT Memory Size is set to 0MB and this BIOS feature set to 32 MB, a total of 32 MB of system memory is allocated as graphics memory in the Fixed mode.

When DVMT Memory Size is set to 0MB and this BIOS feature set to 64 MB, a total of 64 MB of system memory is allocated as graphics memory in the Fixed mode.

When DVMT Memory Size is set to 0MB and this BIOS feature set to 128 MB, a total of 128 MB of system memory is allocated as graphics memory in the Fixed mode.

If DVMT Memory Size is set to any value other than 0 MB, then the onboard graphics processor will operate in the Fixed + DVMT Memory mode. This would be based on the total memory size allocated to both DVMT Memory Size and FIXED Memory Size.

For example, if you set DVMT Memory Size to 64 MB and FIXED Memory Size to 64 MB, the total graphics memory size would be 128 MB. But the actual allocation of graphics memory would depend on the amount of pre-allocated graphics memory.

Generally, it is recommended that you let the graphics driver allocate memory in DVMT mode. This allows the driver to dynamically allocate memory according to changing situations. This means setting this BIOS feature to 0 MB and setting the maximum graphics memory size using the DVMT Memory Size BIOS feature. It’s advisable to restrict the total graphics memory to approximately 256 MB for systems with lots of memory (768 MB or more) and reduce the graphics memory in systems with less memory.

 

Details of FIXED Memory Size

Unified Memory Architecture (UMA) is a concept whereby system memory is shared by both CPU and graphics processor. While this reduces cost, it also reduces the system’s performance by taking up a large portion of memory for the graphics processor.

Intel’s Dynamic Video Memory Technology (DVMT) takes that concept further by allowing the system to dynamically allocate memory resources according to the demands of the system at any point in time. The key idea in DVMT is to improve the efficiency of the memory allocated to either system or graphics processor.

To ensure better allocation of system memory, DVMT comes with three different operating modes :

  • Fixed Memory
  • DVMT Memory
  • Fixed + DVMT Memory

For more details on the individual operating modes, please take a look at the DVMT Mode BIOS feature.

Before we go further, it’s important to note that the system boots up with some system memory pre-allocated for graphics. Depending on the motherboard manufacturer, you may or may not be allowed to select between a choice of 1 MB or 8 MB of pre-allocated memory.

This pre-allocated memory is dedicated to VGA/SVGA graphics and will be treated by the operating system as dedicated graphics memory. This pre-allocated memory will not be visible or accessible to the operating system. It will be used during the booting process to display the boot and splash screens, or when you run MS-DOS games and applications. It will also be used when Windows XP loads in Safe Mode.

Once an operating system with the appropriate Intel Graphics Media Accelerator Driver loads up, the graphics processor reclaims the pre-allocated memory for its use. But again, it is only available for use as graphics memory. It will never be made available to the operating system or applications. The Intel GMA driver then loads additional system memory as required.

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The FIXED Memory Size BIOS feature is used in conjunction with the DVMT Memory Size BIOS feature to select the operating mode as well as the maximum amount of graphics memory that can be allocated to the onboard graphics processor.

When DVMT Memory Size is set to 0MB and FIXED Memory Size set to 32MB, up to 32 MB of system memory is allocated as graphics memory in the DVMT mode. This is usually allocated as below :

DVMT Graphics Memory

Pre-Allocated

Fixed

Total

1 MB

31 MB

32 MB

8 MB

24 MB

When DVMT Memory Size is set to 0MB and this BIOS feature set to 64MB, up to 64 MB of system memory is allocated as graphics memory in the DVMT mode. This is usually allocated as below :

DVMT Graphics Memory

Pre-Allocated

Fixed

Total

1 MB

63 MB

64 MB

8 MB

56 MB

When DVMT Memory Size is set to 0MB and this BIOS feature set to 128MB, up to 128 MB of system memory is allocated as graphics memory in the DVMT mode. This is usually allocated as below :

DVMT Graphics Memory

Pre-Allocated

Fixed

Total

1 MB

127 MB

128 MB

8 MB

120 MB

If DVMT Memory Size is set to any value other than 0MB, then the onboard graphics processor will operate in the Fixed + DVMT Memory mode. This would be based on the total memory size allocated to both DVMT Memory Size and FIXED Memory Size.

For example, if you set DVMT Memory Size to 64MB and FIXED Memory Size to 64MB, the total graphics memory size would be 128 MB. But the actual allocation of graphics memory would depend on the amount of pre-allocated graphics memory. Usually, it would be allocated as below :

DVMT Graphics Memory

Pre-Allocated

Fixed

Total

1 MB

63 MB + 64 MB

128 MB

8 MB

56 MB + 64 MB

Please note that this BIOS feature only restricts the maximum amount of system memory that can be allocated as graphics memory in DVMT mode. The graphics driver will determine the actual amount of system memory requisitioned, up to the maximum set. In addition, DVMT graphics memory can be re-allocated to the operating system when there are no graphics-intensive applications running.

Generally, it is recommended that you let the graphics driver allocate memory in DVMT mode. This allows the driver to dynamically allocate memory according to changing situations. This means setting the FIXED Memory Size BIOS feature to 0MB and setting the maximum graphics memory size using this BIOS feature.

It’s advisable to restrict the total graphics memory to approximately 256 MB for systems with lots of memory (768 MB or more) and reduce the graphics memory in systems with less memory.

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