Tag Archives: Eugene Kaspersky

Kaspersky Selects Malaysia For APAC Transparency Center!

Kaspersky Selects Malaysia For APAC Transparency Center!

Kaspersky just announced that they have selected Malaysia as the site for their APAC Transparency Center!

Here is everything you need to know about the third Kaspersky Transparency Center, and why they chose Malaysia.

 

The Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative

The Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative began in October 2017, as a way to allay fears that Kaspersky Lab products and services had backdoors built-in.

It was really an extension of Eugene Kaspersky’s offer to show Kaspersky Lab source codes to the US government.

For a more detailed take on the Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative, we recommend :

 

Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative APAC Update

The Managing Director for Asia Pacific at Kaspersky, Stephan Neumeier, kicked off the launch with an update on the Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative, with a focus on the APAC region.

  • Started relocating customer data storage and processing infrastructure for European users from Russia to Zurich, Switzerland, to be completed by the end of 2019.
  • Opened two Transparency Centers in Europe – in Zurich (November 2018) and Madrid (June 2019). The Spanish Center also serves as a briefing center for key company stakeholders.
  • Successfully completed the Service Organization Control for Service Organizations (SOC 2) Type 1 audit. The final report, issued by one of the Big Four accounting firms, confirms that the development and release of Kaspersky’s threat detection rules databases (AV databases) are protected from unauthorised changes by strong security controls.
  • Since announcing the Bug Bounty program’s extension, Kaspersky resolved 66 bugs reported by security researchers and awarded almost $45,000 in bounty rewards.
  • Kaspersky also supports the io framework which provides Safe Harbor for vulnerability researchers concerned about potential negative legal consequences of their discoveries.
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Why Kaspersky Selected Malaysia For The APAC Transparency Center

Kaspersky revealed that their APAC Transparency Center will be located in Cyberjaya, in partnership with CyberSecurity Malaysia.

Cyberjaya was selected because of its central location and close proximity to many key Kaspersky clients in APAC, as well as other security- and infrastructure-related reasons.

 

What Is The Kaspersky APAC Transparency Center For?

The new Kaspersky APAC Transparency Center in Malaysia will serve as the third trusted code review facility, after Zurich and Madrid.

Government regulators and Kaspersky enterprise clients can request to come to the Kaspersky APAC Transparency Center to examine or review :

  • source code of Kaspersky consumer and enterprise solutions, like Kaspersky Internet Security (KIS), Kaspersky Endpoint Security (KES) and Kaspersky Security Center (KSC)
  • Kaspersky’s threat analysis, secure review and application security testing process
  • all versions of Kaspersky software builds, and AV database updates
  • data feeds that are sent by Kaspersky products to the cloud-based Kaspersky Security Network (KSN)

It will also function as a briefing centre, where guests will be able to learn about Kaspersky’s engineering and data processing practises.

This new Kaspersky Transparency Center is slated to open for its first visitors in early 2020. Like the other Transparency Centers, access is available only upon request.

 

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Why AI Digital Intuition Will Deliver Cyberimmunity By 2050!

In his first prediction for Earth 2050, Eugene Kaspersky believes that AI digital intuition will deliver cyberimmunity by 2050. Do YOU agree?

 

What Is Earth 2050

Earth 2050 is a Kaspersky social media project – an open crowdsourced platform, where everyone can share their visions of the future.

So far, there are nearly 400 predictions from 70+ visionaries, from futurologist Ian Pearson, astrophysicist Martin Rees, venture capitalist Steven Hoffman, architect-engineer Carlo Ratti, writer James Kunstler and sci-fi writer David Brin.

Eugene himself dabbles in cyberdivination, and shares with us, a future of cyberimmunity created by AI digital intuition!

 

Eugene Kaspersky : From Digital Intuition To Cyberimmunity!

In recent years, digital systems have moved up to a whole new level. No longer assistants making life easier for us mere mortals, they’ve become the basis of civilization — the very framework keeping the world functioning properly in 2050.

This quantum leap forward has generated new requirements for the reliability and stability of artificial intelligence. Although some cyberthreats still haven’t become extinct since the romantic era around the turn of the century, they’re now dangerous only to outliers who for some reason reject modern standards of digital immunity.

The situation in many ways resembles the fight against human diseases. Thanks to the success of vaccines, the terrible epidemics that once devastated entire cities in the twentieth century are a thing of the past.

 

However, that’s where the resemblance ends. For humans, diseases like the plague or smallpox have been replaced by new, highly resistant “post-vaccination” diseases; but for the machines, things have turned out much better.

This is largely because the initial designers of digital immunity made all the right preparations for it in advance. In doing so, what helped them in particular was borrowing the systemic approaches of living systems and humans.

One of the pillars of cyber-immunity today is digital intuition, the ability of AI systems to make the right decisions in conditions where the source data are clearly insufficient to make a rational choice.

But there’s no mysticism here: Digital intuition is merely the logical continuation of the idea of machine learning. When the number and complexity of related self-learning systems exceeds a certain threshold, the quality of decision-making rises to a whole new level — a level that’s completely elusive to rational understanding.

An “intuitive solution” results from the superimposition of the experience of a huge number of machine-learning models, much like the result of the calculations of a quantum computer.

So, as you can see, it has been digital intuition, with its ability to instantly, correctly respond to unknown challenges that has helped build the digital security standards of this new era.

 

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The Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative Explained!

The upcoming Trump-Putin summit aside, Kaspersky Lab is pushing forward with their Global Transparency Initiative. What is the Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative? And how does it help guarantee that Kaspersky Lab products and services are safe to use?

We explain it all, with a little help from Stephan Neumeier and Oleg Abdurashitov from Kaspersky Lab!

 

The Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative

The Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative began in October 2017, as a way to allay fears that Kaspersky Lab products and services had backdoors built-in.

It was really an extension of Eugene Kaspersky’s offer to show Kaspersky Lab source codes to the US government.

July 2017 : Eugene Kaspersky Offers Source Codes To US Government

In response to the US government’s prohibition on the use of Kaspersky Lab products, Eugene Kaspersky offered to make Kaspersky Lab source codes available to the US government for inspection.

Oct. 2017 : Source Codes Available For Inspection

In the initial version, Kaspersky Lab offered to :

  • make their source codes available for independent review and evaluation,
  • conduct an independent assessment of their software development and supply chain,
  • establish three Transparency Centers in Asia, Europe and the US.
  • increase bug bounty awards to US$100,000

We immediately pointed out that it did not address a major concern of the US government – that data is still being routed through Russian Internet service providers that are subject to the Russian intelligence surveillance system called SORM (System of Operative-Investigative Measures).

Kaspersky Lab maintained that customer data sent to their Russian servers are encrypted, and they do not decrypt them for the Russian government. But it would be impossible for them to prove that to anyone’s satisfaction.

May 2018 : Core Operations Moves To Switzerland

Last month, Kaspersky Lab announced that they are establishing a data center in Zurich by the end of 2019. This facility will store and process all information for users in Europe, North America, Singapore, Australia, Japan and South Korea, with more countries to follow.

The Kaspersky Switzerland facility will :

  • store and process customer data of select countries outside of Russia
  • host Kaspersky’s software build conveyer that will assemble and digitally-sign the final executable files and updates
  • serve as the first Kaspersky Transparency Center.

In addition, Kaspersky will be arranging for a qualified and independent third-party to review and supervise the data storage, processing, software assembly and source codes at this Zurich facility.

The very act of moving their customer data out of Russia to a neutral country finally removes our main criticism of their initial transparency initiative. Now, no one has to worry about sensitive data being transmitted through the Russian SORM intelligence surveillance system.

 

The Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative Going Forward

The establishment of the Swiss datacenter is merely another phase in the long process of “earning trust”, as Stephan Neumeier called it. Eventually, customer data from most countries outside of Russia will move to that datacenter.

By the end of 2018, all Kaspersky Lab products and threat detection rule databases (AV databases) will be assembled and signed with a digital signature in Switzerland, before being distributed to customers worldwide. All newly assembled software will also be verified by an independent organization, certifying that software builds and updates received by customers match the source code provided for audit.

The next step would be the establishment of two more Transparency Centers – one in Asia, and another one in North America. Singapore and Canada are probable favourites.

 

Perhaps A Backdoor Bounty?

We would suggest that perhaps Kaspersky Lab should establish an independent backdoor bounty program, separate from their current bug bounty.

A large sum of money could be placed in escrow, under an independent and competent third-party, which can freely investigate and reward security researchers who can successfully prove the existence of a backdoor in any Kaspersky product or service.

That would go a long way into shoring up trust of those who have neither the financial nor the technical capabilities to visit a Kaspersky Transparency Center and peruse millions of lines of code.

 

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Kaspersky Lab Challenges DHS Ban Of Kaspersky Products

December 19, 2017 – Kaspersky Lab is challenging the DHS ban of the use of its products in federal agencies. In a statement issued today, Kaspersky Lab announced that it is seeking an appeal in federal court of U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) decision on Binding Operational Directive 17-01 banning the use of the company’s products in federal agencies.  

 

Kaspersky Lab Challenges DHS Ban Of Kaspersky Products

Kaspersky Lab has filed an appeal under the Administrative Procedure Act to enforce its constitutional due process rights and challenge the DHS ban on the use of the company’s products and solutions by U.S. government agencies.

The company asserts that the DHS’s decision is unconstitutional and relied on subjective, non-technical public sources such as uncorroborated and often anonymously sourced media reports, related claims, and rumours.

Furthermore, Kaspersky Lab claims that the DHS failed to provide the company adequate due process to rebut the unsubstantiated allegations underlying the Directive and has not provided any evidence of wrongdoing.

Kaspersky Lab reached out to DHS in mid-July, offering to provide any information or assistance concerning the company, its operations, or its products. In mid-August, DHS confirmed receipt of the company’s letter, appreciating the offer to provide information and expressing interest in future communications with Kaspersky Lab regarding the matter.

However, the next communication from DHS to Kaspersky Lab was notification regarding the issuance of Binding Operational Directive 17-01 on September 13, 2017.

The DHS ban on the use of Kaspersky products in federal agencies damaged Kaspersky Lab’s reputation and its sales in the U.S. In filing this appeal, Kaspersky Lab hopes to protect its due process rights under the U.S. Constitution and federal law and repair the harm caused to its commercial operations, its U.S.-based employees, and its U.S.-based business partners.

“Because Kaspersky Lab has not been provided a fair opportunity in regards to the allegations and no technical evidence has been produced to validate DHS’s actions, it is in the company’s interests to defend itself in this matter. Regardless of the DHS decision, we will continue to do what really matters: make the world safer from cybercrime,” said Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of Kaspersky Lab.

 

The Kaspersky Global Transparency Initiative

On 23 October 2017, Kaspersky Lab launched its Global Transparency Initiative. This Initiative will include :

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  • an independent review of the company’s source code, software updates and threat detection rules;
  • an independent review of internal processes to verify the integrity of the company’s solutions and processes;
  • three transparency centers by 2020, in Asia, Europe and the U.S.; and
  • increased bug bounty rewards up to $100k per discovered vulnerability in Kaspersky Lab products.

You can read more about this initiative in our article – How Kaspersky Lab Plans To Counter Alleged Ties To Russian Intelligence.

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Kaspersky Lab Reveals Mokes Backdoor In NSA Leak

Kaspersky Lab just issued an update on their internal investigation into the alleged downloading of NSA hacking tools by Russian hackers, and their own team. Their update provides new insights into the hack, including their new findings on the Mokes backdoor used to gain access to the infected computer.

 

What’s Going On With Kaspersky Lab?

Kaspersky Lab can’t seem to get ahead of the bad publicity over the alleged downloading of NSA hacking tools from an NSA employee’s home computer. After the incident was first reported in the Wall Street Journal,  Kaspersky Lab launched an internal investigation.

They have also recently announced their Global Transparency Initiative to combat the perception that they are helping the Russian government attack Western interests.

Read : Eugene Kaspersky On The Cyberspace Survival Guide

 

Kaspersky Lab’s Initial Findings

Kaspersky Labs published these initial findings on 25 October :

  • On September 11, 2014, a Kaspersky Lab product installed on the computer of a U.S.-based user reported an infection of what appeared to be variants of malware used by the Equation APT group– a sophisticated cyber threat actor whose activity had already been under active investigation since March 2014.
  • Sometime after this, the user seems to have downloaded and installed pirated software on their machine, specifically a Microsoft Office ISO file and an illegal Microsoft Office 2013 activation tool (aka “keygen”).
  • To install the pirate copy of Office 2013, the user appears to have disabled the Kaspersky Lab product on their computer, because executing the illegal activator tool would not have been possible with the antivirus enabled.
  • The illegal activation tool contained within the Office ISO was infected with malware. The user was infected with this malware for an unspecified period while the Kaspersky Lab product was inactive. The malware consisted of a full-blown backdoor which could have allowed other third-parties to access the user’s machine.
  • When re-enabled, the Kaspersky Lab product detected the malware with the verdict Backdoor.Win32.Mokes.hvl and blocked this malware from calling out to a known command and control server. The first detection of the malicious setup program was on October 4, 2014.
  • In addition, the antivirus product also detected new and previously known variants of Equation APT malware.
  • One of the files detected by the product as new variants of Equation APT malware was a 7zip archive which was sent back, in accordance to the end-user and KSN license agreements, to the Kaspersky Virus Lab for further analysis.
  • Upon analysis, it was discovered that the archive contained a multitude of files, including known and unknown tools of Equation group, source code, as well as classified documents. The analyst reported the incident to the CEO. Following a request from the CEO, the archive itself, source code, and any apparently classified data were deleted within days from the company’s systems. However, files that are legitimate malware binaries currently remain in Kaspersky Lab storage. The archive was not shared with any third-parties.
  • The reason Kaspersky Lab deleted those files and will delete similar ones in the future is two-fold: first, it needs only malware binaries to improve protection and, secondly, it has concerns regarding the handling of potentially classified material.
  • Because of this incident, a new policy was created for all malware analysts: they are now required to delete any potentially classified material that has been accidentally collected during anti-malware research.
  • The investigation did not reveal any other similar incidents in 2015, 2016 or 2017.
  • To date, no other third-party intrusion aside from Duqu 2.0 has been detected in Kaspersky Lab’s networks.

 

The Mokes Backdoor & Other New Findings

Kaspersky Lab continued their investigation, issuing a new report that confirmed their initial findings above. It also provided additional insight into the analysis of the telemetry of suspicious activities registered on that NSA employee’s computer that was sent to their servers.

One of the major discoveries was the detection of the Mokes backdoor in that NSA employee’s computer. The Mokes backdoor is a malware that allows the hacker to remotely access the computer.

Curious Mokes backdoor background

It is publicly known that the Mokes backdoor (also known as “Smoke Bot” or “Smoke Loader”) appeared on Russian underground forums as it was made available for purchase in 2014. Kaspersky Lab research shows that, during the period of September to November 2014, the command and control servers of this malware were registered to presumably a Chinese entity going by the name “Zhou Lou”.

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Moreover, deeper analysis of Kaspersky Lab telemetry showed that the Mokes backdoor may not have been the only malware infecting the PC in question at the time of the incident as other illegal activation tools and keygens were detected on the same machine.

More non-Equation malware

Over a period of two months, the product reported alarms on 121 items of non-Equation malware: backdoors, exploits, Trojans and AdWare. All of these alerts, combined with the limited amount of available telemetry, means that while Kaspersky Lab can confirm that their product spotted the threats, it is impossible to determine if they were executing during the period the product was disabled.

 

Kaspersky Lab’s Conclusions

Their current investigations conclude thus far that :

  • The Kaspersky Lab software performed as expected and notified our analysts of alerts on signatures written to detect Equation APT group malware that was already under investigation for six months. All of this in accordance with the description of the declared product functionality, scenarios, and legal documents which the user agreed to prior to the installation of the software.
  • What is believed to be potentially classified information was pulled back because it was contained within an archive that fired on an Equation-specific APT malware signature.
  • Beside malware, the archive also contained what appeared to be source code for Equation APT malware and four Word documents bearing classification markings. Kaspersky Lab doesn’t possess information on the content of the documents as they were deleted within days.
  • Kaspersky Lab cannot assess whether the data was “handled appropriately” (according to U.S. Government norms) since our analysts have not been trained on handling U.S. classified information, nor are they under any legal obligation to do so. The information was not shared with any third party.
  • Contrary to multiple media publications, no evidence has been found that Kaspersky Lab researchers have ever tried to issue “silent” signatures aimed at searching for documents with words like “top secret” and “classified” and other similar words.
  • The Mokes backdoor infection and potential infections of other non-Equation malware point to the possibility that user data could have been leaked to an unknown number of third-parties as a result of remote access to the computer.

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How Kaspersky Lab Plans To Counter Alleged Ties To Russian Intelligence

Alleged Ties To Russian Intelligence

Kaspersky Lab can’t seem to get rid of the stigma of being a Russian company. Even after Eugene Kaspersky publicly declared that Russian President Vladimir Putin is not his friend, and offered to show his source codes to the US government, he can’t shake off the perception that he’s helping the Russian government attack Western interests.

It did not help that Israeli government hackers provided the US National Security Agency (NSA) with evidence that Russian hackers used Kaspersky Lab software to scan for American classified programs. They also found NSA hacking tools in the Kaspersky Lab network, the same tools that the NSA later confirmed were in Russian intelligence hands.

That was what led to the US General Services Administration directive to remove Kaspersky Lab from its list of approved vendors, and the US Senate to call for a government-wide ban.

There is no evidence that Kaspersky Lab itself was complicit in helping Russian intelligence scan for American classified programs, or obtain the NSA hacking tools. It is entirely possible that the Russian intelligence hackers merely exploited the same flaws in Kaspersky Lab software that the Israelis used to gain access to their network and software.

However, all these controversies have greatly undermined Kaspersky Lab’s credibility and sales worldwide.

 

The Kaspersky Lab Global Transparency Initiative

The Kaspersky Lab Global Transparency Initiative attempts to prove and assure their customers (and potential customers) that there are no backdoors in their software. Under this initiative, Kaspersky Lab will make their source codes, including software updates and threat detection rules, available for independent review and evaluation.

Their Global Transparency Initiative will kick off with these actions :

  1. Kaspersky Lab will offer their source codes for an independent review by Q1 2018, with similar independent reviews of their software updates and threat detection rules to follow.
  2. An independent assessment of the Kaspersky Lab development lifecycle processes, and its software and supply chain risk mitigation strategies, will begin by Q1 2018.
  3. Additional controls to govern Kaspersky Lab data processing practices, with verification by an independent party, will be developed by Q1 2018.
  4. Three Transparency Centers will be established in Asia, Europe and the US to address security issues with Kaspersky Lab partners, customers and government stakeholders. They will also serve as a facility for “trusted partners to access reviews on the company’s code, software updates and threat detection rules“. The first Transparency Center will open by 2018, with the rest by 2020.
  5. Kaspersky Lab will increase their bug bounty awards up to $100,000 for the most severe vulnerabilities found under their Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure program by the end of 2017.

Kaspersky Lab will later announce the next phase of the Global Transparency Initiative, after engaging with their stakeholders and the cybersecurity community.

 

What This Does Not Address

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The initial phase of the Kaspersky Lab Global Transparency Initiative will help verify, and assure their customers, that there are no backdoors in their software. However, it does not address a major concern for the US government – the fact that their data is routed through Russian Internet service providers that are subject to the Russian intelligence surveillance system called SORM (System of Operative-Investigative Measures).

Kaspersky Lab has said that customer data sent to their Russian servers are encrypted, and they do not decrypt it for the Russian government. But it would be impossible for them to prove it. Perhaps they will address this concern in the next phase of their Global Transparency Initiative.

Don’t forget to read our interview with Eugene Kaspersky on his alleged ties with Russian President Vladimir Putin and the Kremlin.

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The Kaspersky Palaeontology of Cybersecurity Conference

Last week, Kaspersky Lab invited us to their security conference on the sidelines of INTERPOL World 2017. Titled as the Palaeontology of Cybersecurity, it focused on Kaspersky Lab’s efforts and abilities in dissecting malware and cyberattacks and tracing their sources.

It was a riveting look at how they tackled the thousands of cybersecurity threats that are active every day – from those that hit the news, like WannaCry and NotPetya, to those that continue to quietly cause damage and losses to consumers and corporations alike.

We also had the opportunity to hear from Eugene Kaspersky himself, as well as Jason Wells, an ex-military intelligence officer, who now helps companies tackle electronic surveillance and corporate espionage. Finally, we had a whole hour to grill them all on anything we wanted!

A lot was covered during the conference, so we will split them up into multiple articles :

We also had the opportunity to grill Eugene Kaspersky on his run-in with the US Senate. Make sure you check out our exclusive conversation with him :

For the video clips and a quick summary of each, please continue below.

 

The Palaeontology Of Cyberattacks

He shared how Kaspersky Labs performed digital forensics, literally the palaeontology of digital monsters, to trace their creators and to learn how to shut them down.

Please check out the full article on his presentation > The Palaeontology of Cyberattacks by Vitaly Kamluk.

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The BitScout Cyber Forensics Tool Revealed!

BitScout is a free and open-source tool that can be used for the remote forensic investigation or collection of data from a compromised system, without risk of contamination or loss of data.

Please check out the full article on BitScout > The BitScout Free Cyber Forensics Tool Revealed!

 

South Korean Cyberattacks – From Military To ATM

Seongsu Park details how Kaspersky GReAT researchers traced the disparate South Korean cyberattacks and found the similarities that connected them.

Please check out the full article on his presentation > The South Korean Cyberattacks – From Military To ATM

Next Page > The Palaeontology of Cybersecurity Conference Part 2

 

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The Spring Dragon / Lotus Blossom Advanced Persistent Threat

Noushin Shabab recounts how her team tracked the Spring Dragon APT (Advanced Persistent Threat) attacks across the South China Sea region.

Please check out the full article on her presentation > Tracking The Spring Dragon Advanced Persistent Threat.

 

The Latest Cyber Technical Surveillance Counter-Measures (TSCM)

Former military intelligence officer Jason Wells gives an overview of cyber technical surveillance counter-measures over the years and in the future!

Please check out the full article on his presentation > The Latest Cyber Technical Surveillance Counter-Measures (TSCM)

 

Cyberspace – The Survival Guide

In this engaging 35-minute talk, Eugene Kaspersky shares with us his opinions on the evolving cybersecurity threats and how we can survive them.

Please check out the full article on his presentation > Eugene Kaspersky Presents Cyberspace –  The Survival Guide

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The Kaspersky Lab Security Conference Q&A Session

At the end of the conference, we had an hour to question the Kaspersky Lab experts, Eugene Kaspersky and Jason Wells. Check out the complete Q&A session!

 

Eugene Kaspersky Interview Exclusive : No Kremlin Ties!

I took the opportunity to grill Mr. Kaspersky on his run-in with the US Senate over accusations of personal ties to the Kremlin and close affiliation with Russian intelligence agencies. Check out this exclusive video of our exchange!

Please check out the full article on this exclusive interview > Eugene Kaspersky Interview Exclusive : No Kremlin Ties!

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Eugene Kaspersky Presents Cyberspace – The Survival Guide

As the Chairman and CEO of Kaspersky Lab, Eugene Kaspersky is no stranger to cybersecurity. In fact, he created his first antivirus software while serving in the Russian Ministry of Defense in 1989 – 8 years before he founded his eponymous cybersecurity firm.

His credentials, as far as cybersecurity goes, is impeccable. That is why his keynote speech entitled “Cyberspace – The Survival Guide” was arguably the highlight of the Kaspersky Lab Palaeontology of Cybersecurity conference.

Don’t forget to check out the other Kaspersky Palaeontology of Cybersecurity presentations!

 

Eugene Kaspersky Presents Cyberspace – The Survival Guide

In this engaging 35-minute talk, Eugene Kaspersky shares with us his opinions on the evolving cybersecurity threats and how we can survive them.

Here are the key takeaway points from Eugene Kaspersky’s keynote talk :

  • Eugene Kaspersky still uses an old Sony Ericsson feature phone, which he says is “unhackable”.
  • Microsoft Windows is still the main target of cyberattacks, because it’s still the most popular operating system and the default operating system for many enterprises.
  • Cyberattacks are increasingly shifting to the mobile platform, targeting the Android operating system in particular.
  • The Mac OS platform is relatively safe because there are still not that many Mac user, or Mac programmers who can craft malware to target them.
  • However, Eugene Kaspersky (pointing at my MacBook Pro) says that Mac OS is much more vulnerable than Microsoft Windows from a cybersecurity point of view. It is only “safer” because there are not many cybercriminals who can exploit this.
  • The threat of Linux malware is growing very fast, because Internet of Things (IoT) devices are mostly Linux-based.
  • iOS attacks are limited because their zero-day vulnerabilities are very expensive for cybercriminals to purchase.
  • Kaspersky Lab collects about 300,000 unique malicious code samples per day, or more than 2 million unique code samples a week.
  • The growth in malware is exponential. Kaspersky Lab took 20 years to collect their first million unique malware code samples, but just one week in 2016 to collect 2.2 million unique malware code samples.
  • The good news is that Kaspersky Lab processes these malware code samples automatically 99.9% of the time using self-learning machine algorithms.
  • Eugene Kaspersky dismisses the tech industry’s use of the term “artificial intelligence“, insisting that they are more accurately described as “self-learning machine algorithms“.
  • Unfortunately, there is a marked growth in highly sophisticated state-sponsored and criminal cyberattacks that cannot be addressed by these means.
  • Cybercrime now costs the world US$450 billion in losses every year – the equivalent of 13 years worth of budget for all of world’s space programmes combined.
  • IoT (Internet of Things) devices are the new frontier. There are now more IoT devices than human beings on Earth. The danger though lies in the fact that most of them cannot be patched, and use common, standard passwords for easier manageability, but makes them easy to hack.[adrotate group=”2″]
  • SCADA industrial control systems are also vulnerable to cyberattacks. There are now cybercriminals that target the SCADA systems of manufacturing and transportation companies, as well as state-sponsored attacks and possible terrorist attacks.
  • Eugene Kaspersky skipped past the Elections and Government Services slide, probably due to the recent US Senate accusations. I made it a point to ask him about that controversy during the Q&A session though.
  • Cybersecurity of individuals and SMBs (small and medium businesses) are easy to solve, because you can purchase and install cybersecurity software that will handle the common cybersecurity threats.
  • Enterprises, however, are under the additional threat of professional, targeted attacks. In addition to end-point protection, they will need to be able to predict and detect cyberattacks, and respond quickly to those that are identified.

Eugene ends his presentation by opining that a lot of work needs to be done to secure the world from from cybercriminals, thanks to the prevalence of cyberspace in our lives.

Don’t forget to check out the other Kaspersky Palaeontology of Cybersecurity presentations!

Next Page > The Cyberspace – The Survival Guide Presentation Slides

 

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Here is the complete set of Eugene Kaspersky’s presentation slides for his talk, Cyberspace – The Survival Guide for your perusal.

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Don’t forget to check out the other Kaspersky Palaeontology of Cybersecurity presentations!

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If you like our work, you can help support our work by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!

Eugene Kaspersky Interview Exclusive : No Kremlin Ties!

At the end of the Kaspersky Lab Palaeontology of Cybersecurity conference, members of the press were allowed to question the panel of speakers, including Kaspersky Lab Chairman and CEO, Eugene Kaspersky himself.

I took the opportunity to grill Mr. Kaspersky on his run-in with the US Senate over accusations of personal ties to the Kremlin and close affiliation with Russian intelligence agencies. Check out this exclusive video of our exchange!

Don’t forget to check out the Kaspersky Palaeontology of Cybersecurity presentations!

 

Eugene Kaspersky On His Alleged Kremlin Ties

On 27 June 2017, FBI agents visited the homes of some Kaspersky Lab employees in the US. The very next day, Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) introduced an amendment to a Pentagon spending bill that prohibits the US Department of Defense from “using software platforms developed by Kaspersky Lab“.

In response, Eugene Kaspersky (also known as Yevgeny Kaspersky) said that he would be willing to appear before the US Senate. He also offered to show Kaspersky’s source codes to the US government, if that will help assure them that there is nothing malicious in them.

 

The Eugene Kaspersky Interview Transcript

Here is a transcript of the exchange, with some paraphrasing. The Kaspersky APAC Director of GReAT, Vitaly Kamluk, also chipped in his 2 cents, as did Stephan Neumeier, the Managing Director of Kaspersky Lab Asia Pacific.

Tech ARP : You said that you would testify before the US Congress and share your source codes. Have they requested you to testify or share your source codes?

Eugene Kaspersky : We are under strange pressure from the United States. They point a finger at us, and say that we are a danger to the United States, without evidence.

They suspect that we have very strong ties with the Russian government. I’m very curious what’s [the evidence]? If not the names of the people, then at least the names of the agencies involved. Silence. So they don’t have any facts.

Okay, ask me to testify before the Senate, please.[adrotate group=”2″]

Tech ARP : Have they done so?

Eugene Kaspersky : No! No, no, no.

Tech ARP : What about your offer to release the source codes to them? Have they accepted the offer?

Eugene Kaspersky : No! They speak a lot about us, but when we say “Let’s do some real investigation. We can open anything you want.“… Silence.

Tech ARP : What about your offer to release the source codes also extend to other countries, like China, for example?

Eugene Kaspersky : No! Not like this in any other country.

Tech ARP : So [the offer to release the source codes] is only for the United States?

Eugene Kaspersky : Actually we disclose some technologies in some other countries, but I’m not going to name those countries. We did it to comply with government contract requirements.

We are a transparent company. If you have any questions, just ask us. It’s not a problem at all. So we don’t have this kind of problem in any other country but the United States.

Tech ARP : Beyond the source code, there is also the concern about data collection on US DOD employees by Kaspersky Lab, which is a Russian company. Do you have a comment on this?

Eugene Kaspersky : We only collect suspicious pieces of data, that might be malware samples. We do not collect the user’s data.

Well, we collect the user’s data if the user is a cybercriminal. If he’s developing malicious code on a computer, we will take it (the malicious code) because it looks suspicious. But the rest of the data – we do not touch, and we don’t collect any user-identifiable data.

Actually, it’s very strange when the United States say that I can cooperate with the (Russian) secret services and disclose data, but I don’t have this data.

The most confidential information that we have in our company are the cyberattack incidence reports involving our customers. We help our customers to investigate these cyberattacks but we don’t share this data with anyone. There could be information about ongoing investigations, but we don’t share this information with anyone but the law enforcement agencies that are handling the case. That’s it.

We don’t have any user-identifiable data or enterprise data, unless it’s for an investigation of a cyberattack.

Vitaly Kamluk : I also want to add that the control of whether to share data (or not) is always in the user’s hands. We never force the collection of user’s data. You can switch it on or off.

We do not hard-code the collection of data. There is a control and it’s in the user’s hands. So if certain organisations or individuals are concerned about the collection of data, they can switch it off.

Eugene Kaspersky : Yes, they can switch it off.

Tech ARP : What about telemetry, statistics, etc?

Vitaly Kamluk : You can switch it off – malware detection statistics and even malware samples. This is in the user’s control – to share or not to share.

Eugene Kaspersky : In most of the cases, we don’t know who our users are. We see their product ID when their Kaspersky product connects to the cloud for updates, but we don’t know the name of their user.

Tech ARP : There are claims that you have connections or links to the Kremlin. Can you deny or acknowledge these claims?

Eugene Kaspersky : They are my customers. We cooperate with the cyber police forces in Russia.

Tech ARP : Are you Vladimir Putin’s friend?[adrotate group=”2″]

Eugene Kaspersky : No. Is Putin my friend? No.

Mark (Moderator) : Is Donald Trump your friend?

Eugene Kaspersky : <Laughs> No. In my office, there is only one picture – my handshake with Angela Merkel. No more.

Stephan Neumeier : True.

Eugene Kaspersky : Did you see it?

Stephan Neumeier : Yes.

Eugene Kaspersky : Once I had a handshake with Lee Kuan Yew (former Prime Minister of Singapore), but unfortunately, I don’t have a picture of that.

Don’t forget to check out the Kaspersky Palaeontology of Cybersecurity presentations!

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Support Tech ARP!

If you like our work, you can help support our work by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!