Tag Archives: Chemical

Are Rohingyas using chemicals to freshen old vegetables to sell?!

Are Rohingyas using chemicals to make old vegetables look fresh, so they can sell to unsuspecting customers?!

Take a look at the viral video, and find out what the facts really are!

 

Claim : Rohingyas Use Chemicals To Freshen Old Vegetables For Sale!

People are sharing a video of a man showing how he freshens old vegetables by dipping them into a chemical solution, so he can sell them as fresh vegetables!

The video has gone viral on social media, and is being shared on WhatsApp with messages like these:

The Rohingas population there is huge and they sell veggies like that
I’ve been to selayang market with H

Rohingas are protected by the UNCHR. They even have a big international school

The Rohingas do not buy the veggies

The foreigners and Malaysians buy the veggies
Especially the small biz people
Because it’s cheap

Watch how vegetables are made fresh by using chemicals in 105 seconds. That’s why arbuda (cancer) is growing. In 105 seconds, vegetables and fruits are freshened by cancer-causing chemicals.

THIS TECHNIQUE IS USED BY THE ROHINGYAS IN SELAYANG MARKETS WHO SOLD VEGETABLE ON THE ROADSIDES.

Recommended : Did Justin Bieber Just Die In A High Speed Car Crash?!

 

Claim : Rohingyas Are Not Using Chemicals To Freshen Old Vegetables!

This is yet another example of FAKE NEWS created and propagated by people to cast aspersions on the marginalised Rohingyas who are refugees in Malaysia, and many other countries, and here are the reasons why…

Fact #1 : This Is An Old + Edited Video

First, let me just point out that this is an old video that was edited for length, from its original run time of 4 minutes 7 seconds to just 1 minutes 42 seconds.

The earliest version appeared to have been uploaded to YouTube on 23 July 2021, by a Telugu channel called Mana Family Trends. Back then, it went viral on WhatsApp as well.

The shorter edited video first appeared on LinkedIn in middle of March 2023. It went viral there, and was reposted to Twitter on Friday, 17 March 2023, where it blew up.

Fact #2 : Original Video Did Not Refer To Rohingyas

The original video, and the newer but shorter video, did not refer to the Rohingyas in their description or titles.

See how dried leafy vegetables are made by dipping them in chemicals / వాడిపోయిన ఆకు కూరలు కెమికల్లో ముంచితె ఎలా తయారవుతున్నాయో చూడండి

This is 105 sec live video of how vegetables and fruits are freshened by washing them in chemicals. In just a minute, the vegetables look fresh. This is the reason for the increase in critical illnesses nowadays.

A two minute real life horror story. 😱

Recommended : Does Steaming Food Cause Cancer From Chlorine?!

Fact #3 : The Video Was Recorded In India

The video was recorded in India, and not Malaysia. So it has absolutely nothing to do with the Rohingya refugees here in Malaysia.

Fact #4 : It Appears To Be A Spreader Sticker Activator Demonstration

The video does not show farmers freshening their old vegetables by dipping them into a chemical bath.

Rather, the video appears to show a salesperson from an agrochemical company demonstrating the wetting effect of a spreader sticker activator.

Spreader sticker activator is meant to be mixed with other chemicals, because it is inert and works as an adjuvant (see Fact #5). Therefore, you won’t see anyone dip their produce into the spreader sticker activator, as seen in the viral video, except in demonstrations like this.

Fact #5 : Many Agrochemical Products Contain Spreader Sticker Activator

Spreader Sticker Activator is a silicone-based chemical compound that is mixed with pesticides, herbicides or fertilisers to boost their performance by:

  • reducing surface tension, to allow for rapid wetting and absorption
  • improving the adhesion of those chemicals
  • opening the pores for faster absorption

By using a sticker spreader activator, you can use less chemicals and yet, they are more effective and last longer, saving you money. Hence, many agrochemical products already come with sticker spreader activator mixed in as an adjuvant.

Recommended : Truth About FDA Import Alert 99-33 On Japanese Food!

Fact #6 : Spreader Sticker Activators Are Considered Biologically Inert

Spreader sticker activators are considered to be biologically inert, and are therefore not registered by the US EPA. There is also no OSHA hazard classification.

There is currently no evidence that spreader sticker activators can cause cancer, or any other disease.

That said, its safety profile is based on the fact that only a small amount is mixed with other chemicals. It is not meant to be applied alone to plants, never mind used to soak them.

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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Is There Poison In COVID-19 Rapid Antigen Test Kits?!

Is there a poison called sodium azide in COVID-19 rapid test kits?!

Take a look at the viral claim, and find out what the facts really are!

 

Claim : There Is Poison In Rapid Antigen Test Kits!

The Internet is now abuzz with the warning by the National Capital Poison Center that COVID-19 rapid antigen test kits contain a poison called sodium azide.

“Sodium azide is a very potent poison,” says the National Capital Poison Center, which is not a government agency, “and ingestion of relatively low doses can cause significant toxicity.”

“When swallowed, sodium azide can cause low blood pressure, dizziness, headache, and heart palpitations. In more severe cases, seizures, loss of consciousness, and death may occur.”

Rapid Antigen Test Poison Fears : Only Dangerous If Misused!

This is yet another example of collective alarmism, based on a relatively innocuous warning by the National Capital Poison Center (NCPC) – an independent, non-profit organisation.

For those who want a quick summary, here are the key points :

  1. Sodium azide is used in some (but not all) rapid antigen test kits as a preservative, in very small amounts.
  2. Sodium azide is poisonous, but the amount is too small in rapid test kits to pose a real danger if accidentally swallowed by adults.
  3. NCPC never said that rapid antigen test kits are dangerous or poisonous, only that the buffer solution in those kits should not be swallowed or dripped into eyes, nose or mouths.

 

Rapid Antigen Test Poison Fears : What You Need To Know…

For those who want to learn more, here is what you need to know about sodium azide – the “poison” in the COVID-19 rapid antigen test kits.

Fact #1 : NCPC Was Warning About Potential Misuse

The NCPC article on sodium azide in COVID-19 rapid antigen test kits was first published on 18 January 2022, but only went viral 6-7 weeks later.

The author, medical toxicologist Maryann Amirshahi, did NOT claim that these COVID-19 rapid antigen test kits are poisonous, and should therefore be avoided.

She only warned about the dangers of MISUSING the buffer liquid inside rapid antigen test kits. Specifically, the potential dangers of accidentally swallowing it, or dripping it onto eyes or nose or skin.

Some people may accidentally confuse them with medications and apply the drops into their eyes or nose, which may cause irritation. People also may spill it on their skin which can cause skin irritation or chemical burns. Small children may accidentally swallow the contents of the vial or choke on the vial’s small cap.

Fact #2 : Sodium Azide Is Used As Buffer Preservative

In COVID-19 rapid antigen test kits, sodium azide is used as a preservative, to prevent bacterial growth. If you read the instruction sheet of your rapid antigen test kit, you may see warnings like this :

The buffer contains <0.1% sodium azide as a preservative which may be toxic if ingested. When disposed of through a sink, flush with a large volume of water.

Fact #3 : Sodium Azide Only Used In Some Rapid Antigen Test Kits

Sodium azide is not used in all rapid antigen test kits – manufacturers may opt to use other preservatives, like ProClin 300.

If you are worried, you can check the active ingredient list of the test kit. It should tell you whether sodium azide is used in the buffer solution.

Fact #4 : We Should Avoid Contact With Buffer Solution

At no point in time during the RAT / RTK test process, are you supposed to consume the buffer solution, or come into contact with it.

To avoid accidental consumption, the buffer solution is kept is a sealed squeeze bottle or test tube, which is to be disposed off in the provided biological waste pouch / plastic bag.

Perhaps the greatest risk of contact is when people do not follow instructions, and dip their swabs into the buffer solution before swabbing the nasopharynx and/or throat. Or unsupervised children may drip some into their mouth for a taste.

Fact #5 : Toxicity Depends On The Dose

To be clear, sodium azide is a potentially deadly chemical, but we need to remember that the toxicity of any chemical depends on the dose.

Even if you accidentally touch or consume the buffer, please do NOT panic.

As mentioned earlier, the buffer solution may not even contain sodium azide. Even if sodium azide is present, it is a very small amount – less than 0.1% of buffer volume.

There is usually only about 0.35 ml of buffer solution in each test kit, so we are talking about 0.0035 ml (65 mg) of sodium azide.

Based on its LD50 dose of 20 mg/kg (rabbit), a child weighing 10 kg will only be at significant risk on consuming 200 mg of sodium azide – that’s the amount of sodium azide in 3 buffer bottles.

An adult weighing 50 kg will need to consume about 15 buffer bottles to be at significant risk of toxicity. The NCPC article also states as much :

Fortunately, the amount of sodium azide in most rapid antigen kits is much lower than the amount expected to cause poisoning if swallowed by an adult.

Nevertheless, you should still avoid consuming, or coming into contact with the buffer solution. And obviously, you should never let a child handle the test kit!

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

Recommended Reading

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Support Tech ARP!

Please support us by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or donating to our fund. Thank you!