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Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra Battery Life Comparison

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra Battery Life Comparison

The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra comes with a large 4,500 mAh battery, but how long does it really last at 120 Hz, or at full display resolution?

We put the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra through the paces, and compared it to a few other devices in our lab. Check out the results!

 

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra : Battery Life Considerations

The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra comes with a 4,500 mAh battery, which is just a little larger than the Galaxy Note 10+‘s 4,300 mAh battery.

On paper, this should give it a little more battery life than the Galaxy Note 10+. But the Note 20 Ultra is also the first Note to feature a 120 Hz display.

120 Hz Refresh Rate

A higher refresh rate will give you a smoother display, at the expense of higher power consumption and consequently, lower battery life.

That’s why Samsung doesn’t keep the display running at 120 Hz all the time. Instead, they offer an Adaptive option, doubling the refresh rate to 120 Hz only when it’s “necessary”.

WQHD+ Resolution

The other “trick” that Samsung uses to keep power consumption lower is to use a lower display resolution by default – FHD+ (1080 x 2316 pixels).

You can switch to the full WQHD+ resolution of 1440 x 3088 pixels, but that will increase power consumption and reduce battery life, because the GPU has to process more pixels.

Note : The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra only supports 120 Hz at the FHD+ or HD+ resolutions. Switching to WQHD+ limits you to just 60 Hz.

Let’s find out exactly how much both display options affect the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra‘s battery life!

 

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra Battery Life Comparison

To test the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra‘s battery life, we turned off Automatic Brightness, and set its display brightness to 50%.

Why 50%? That is actually slightly higher than the average indoor brightness level of 40% during the day, and is what we usually use in all our mobile battery life tests.

It is important to fix the brightness level, to make sure the screen brightness does not change as the ambient brightness changes.

We then ran the PCMark Work 2.0 battery life test until its battery capacity dropped to 20% several times, and picked the best result.

Resolution + Refresh Rate Comparison

First, we started with a resolution and refresh rate comparison. The

Work 2.0 FHD+ (60 Hz) WQHD+ (60 Hz) FHD+ (120 Hz)
Battery Capacity 4,500 mAh 4,500 mAh 4,500 mAh
Battery Life 10 hrs 9 mins 9 hrs 17 mins 7 hrs 34 mins
Battery Utilisation 5.91 mAh / min. 6.46 mAh / min. 7.93 mAh / min.

The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra has pretty good battery life of just over 10 hours, but only if you keep it at the default FHD+ resolution and use the standard 60 Hz refresh rate.

Increasing the display resolution to WQHD+ reduced battery life by 52 minutes, or about 8.5%. Not too bad, since you still get 9+ hours.

Switching to Adaptive mode though will drastically reduce battery life by a whopping 155 minutes, which is a full quarter less than its maximum battery life!

Full HD+ Resolution @ 60 Hz

Battery
Performance
MatePad Pro Black Shark
2 Pro
S20 Ultra
(FHD 60Hz)
Galaxy
Note10+
Galaxy
S10+
Note20 Ultra
(FHD 60Hz)
Capacity 7,250 mAh 4,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 4,300 mAh 4,100 mAh 4,500 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs 1 min 12 hrs 25 mins 11 hrs 32 mins 10 hrs 32 mins 10 hrs 17 mins 10 hrs 9 mins
Utilisation
Per Min.
6.90 mAh 4.30 mAh 5.78 mAh 5.44 mAh 5.32 mAh 5.91 mAh
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Even with its slightly larger battery, the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra has a slightly shorter battery life than the Galaxy Note 10+.

It even has a shorter battery life than the Galaxy S10+, which has a 10% smaller battery.

WQHD+ Resolution @ 60 Hz

Battery
Performance
MatePad Pro Black Shark
2 Pro
S20 Ultra
(WQHD 60Hz)
Galaxy
Note10+
Galaxy
S10+
Note20 Ultra
(WQHD 60Hz)
Capacity 7,250 mAh 4,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 4,300 mAh 4,100 mAh 4,500 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs 1 min 12 hrs 25 mins 10 hrs 54 mins 10 hrs 32 mins 10 hrs 17 mins 9 hrs 17 mins
Utilisation
Per Min.
6.90 mAh 4.30 mAh 6.12 mAh 5.44 mAh 5.32 mAh 6.46 mAh
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When we increased the resolution to WQHD+, the Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra had a full hour shorter battery life than the Galaxy S10+, which has a 10% smaller battery.

FHD+ Resolution @ 120 Hz

Battery
Performance
MatePad Pro Black Shark
2 Pro
Galaxy
Note10+
Galaxy
S10+
S20 Ultra
(FHD 120Hz)
Note20 Ultra
(FHD 120Hz)
Capacity 7,250 mAh 4,000 mAh 4,300 mAh 4,100 mAh 5,000 mAh 4,500 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs 1 min 12 hrs 25 mins 10 hrs 32 mins 10 hrs 17 mins 9 hrs 4 mins 7 hrs 34 mins
Utilisation
Per Min.
6.90 mAh 4.30 mAh 5.44 mAh 5.32 mAh 7.35 mAh 7.93 mAh
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Price Check US
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The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra used significantly more power than the Galaxy S20 Ultra, with a 120 Hz refresh rate.

Thanks to its 11% larger battery, and lower power consumption, the Galaxy S20 Ultra lasts 1.5 hours longer than the Note 20 Ultra.

 

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra : Where To Buy?

Malaysia

Here are the direct online purchase links in Malaysia :

Recommended : Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra: Malaysia Launch + Trade-Up Deals!

Singapore

Here are the direct online purchase links in Singapore :

United States

Here are the direct online purchase links in the United States :

United Kingdom

Here are the direct online purchase links in the United Kingdom :

Australia

Here are the direct online purchase links in Australia :

 

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Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : 60Hz vs 120Hz Battery Life!

One of the new features introduced in the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra is its 120Hz display, which allows for smoother scrolling and a more realistic gaming experience.

However, running the display at 120Hz will reduce the Galaxy S20 Ultra’s battery life. Let’s find out exactly how much!

 

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : A Quick Primer!

The Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra is powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 in the United States, and Samsung Exynos 990 in the rest of the world.

To ensure it will last a long time, Samsung gave it a very large 5,000 mAh battery. The corresponding Galaxy S10 Plus from last year only has a 4,100 mAh battery in comparison.

It comes with a 40 MP front camera, and a quad-camera system at the back, with :

  • a 108 MP main camera,
  • a 48 MP telephoto camera with 10X hybrid optical zoom,
  • a 12 MP ultra-wide camera, and
  • a DepthVision camera (for depth sensing)

The top-of-the-line model pairs 16 GB LPDDR5 memory with 512 GB fast UFS 3.0 storage. The other two models come with 12 GB LPDDR5 memory, and either 128 GB or 256 GB storage.

Recommended : Samsung Exynos 990 Performance : How Fast Is It?

 

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : 60Hz vs 120Hz

Running the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra‘s display at 120Hz allows for smoother scrolling and a more realistic gaming experience. However, running the display at 120 Hz saps battery life.

The display not only refreshes twice as often, the GPU has to work twice as hard. This is why Samsung sets the display to 60Hz by default.

 

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : 60Hz vs 120Hz Battery Life!

We ran the PCMark Work 2.0 battery life test until its battery capacity dropped to 20% several times, with the display set to 60Hz and 120Hz. Here were the best results we obtained :

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra @ 60Hz : 11 hours 32 minutes

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra @ 120Hz : 9 hours 4 minutes

So there you have it – increasing the display refresh rate on the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra from 60Hz to 120Hz will reduce its battery life by about 21% or roughly 2.5 hours.

Work 2.0 60Hz Display 120Hz Display Difference
Battery Life 11 hours 32 mins 9 hours 4 mins – 148 mins (21.4%)
Battery Utilisation 5.78 mAh / min. 7.35 mAh / min. + 1.27 mAh / min.

Now we can see why Samsung set the display to 60Hz by default. If battery life is important, keep it at the default refresh rate of 60Hz.

But if you prefer to enjoy the 120Hz display, go on right ahead. Thanks to its large 5,000 mAh battery, the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra will last you quite a few hours!

 

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : Price + Availability

Samsung is only offering two colour options – Cosmic Black, and Cosmic Gray – as shown in our video above.

Here are its recommended retail prices :

  • Malaysia : RM 4,999 (128 GB)
  • United States : $1,399.99 (128 GB) | $1,599.99 (512 GB)
  • United Kingdom : £1,199 (128 GB) | £1,399 (512 GB)
  • Australia : A$1,999 (128 GB)

Here are the online purchase options in Malaysia :

 

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How Samsung Found & Fixed Their Exploding Battery Problem

The Samsung Galaxy Note7 arrived to great acclaim on 19 August 2016. It was literally the best phablet ever, with its IP68 rating and its improved S Pen and Knox capabilities. However, its massive early success was soon overshadowed by reports of some Note7 phablets catching fire – the infamous exploding battery problem.

In October, Samsung initiated a global replacement program, but even some of the replacement devices continued to catch fire. That’s when they decided to recall and permanently end the sale of the Galaxy Note7. Since then, they have been working hard on finding out what happened, and how to prevent a recurrence.

After an exhaustive investigation, Samsung can now reveal what caused both the original and the replacement Galaxy Note7 phablets to catch fire, and what they are doing to prevent that from ever happening again. Check it out!

 

The Investigation

After the global replacement program was initiated, Samsung assembled 700 engineers to find out why some of them would spontaneously catch fire. Together with the replacement Note7 phablets from the global recall, their engineers tested more than 200,000 of those returned devices, and over 30,000 batteries.

Samsung also roped in three industrial safety and quality control organisations – UL, Exponent and TÜV Rheinland – to examine the Galaxy Note7 phablets, and provide Samsung with their own findings.

Finally, Samsung went back and examined every aspect of their production processes in their factories in China, Vietnam and south Korea  – from hardware and software development to the assembly and testing of the Galaxy Note7, as well as logistics.

 

Double Trouble

The reason why both the original and the replacement Galaxy Note7 phablets exhibited similar spontaneous combustion issues was because two different batteries were catching fire under different circumstances.

Battery A

The first situation involved battery A which had an overly small casing. The cramped condition led to the negative electrodes being “deflected in the upper right corner of the battery“, and coming into contact with each other.

Battery B

The second situation involved battery B where welding burrs on the positive electrode penetrated the insulation tape and separator, and came into direct contact with the negative electrode. This essentially resulted in a short circuit.

 

Making Sure It Won’t Happen Again

To ensure that Samsung users will never have to worry about the exploding battery problem ever again, Samsung developed a rigorous 8-point battery safety check protocol for all future Samsung devices :

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  • Enhanced battery durability tests – includes overcharging tests, nail puncture tests and extreme temperature stress tests.
  • Visual inspection tests of every battery under standardised guidelines and objective criteria.
  • X-ray scans of every battery to look for any abnormalities.
  • Every battery will undergo a large scale charging and discharging test.
  • TVOC (Total Volatile Organic Compound) Test –  to make sure there isn’t the slightest possibility of leakage
  • Disassembly Test – the batteries are disassembled to assess their quality, including the battery tab welding and insulation tape conditions.
  • Accelerated Usage Test – the batteries will undergo extensive tests to simulate accelerated consumer usage scenarios
  • △OCV (Delta Open Circuit Voltage) Test – Samsung will check for any change in voltage throughout the manufacturing process, from component level to the assembled device.

Samsung may have been hit hard by the exploding battery problem in the Galaxy Note7, but there may be a silver lining after all. It brought up the critical and often overlooked issue of the safety of lithium-ion batteries that are, by nature, volatile. The new battery safety check protocol Samsung put in place should become an industry-standard. Other smartphone manufacturers would do well to adopt Samsung’s battery safety check protocol, or a similar one.

 

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ADATA X7000 Dual USB Power Bank Released

Taipei, 03 January 2017ADATA Technology today launched the ADATA X7000 Power Bank. As the model name suggests, the device is rated for 7000mAh. The X7000 features dual USB ports for efficient battery top-up of two devices at once.

Its stylish design employs the finest components and smart circuitry to provide multiple protective measures, made of highly durable materials to increase fire and impact resistance. A bespoke hairline-brushed aluminum textured surface combined together with a tough plastic side panels resulted in a unique look which differentiate the X7000 from other power banks.

With a choice of three colors, the X7000 is elevated from a mediocre power charging device to a premium power charger on-the-go for smartphones, tablets, and other devices.

ADATA X7000 Power Bank

Functionality into Fashion

While power banks are often thought of as generic, practical items, the ADATA X7000 power bank is a work of art itself. The combination of durable aluminum surface with tough plastic panels dissolves differences in texture into one unmatched visual experience. This innovative power bank is resistant to scratches, chipping and fingerprints smudges.

Weighs merely 210g and measures up to 12mm in thickness, the X7000 could be fitted into narrow, small spaces. The X7000 comes in three distinct colors to better match various smart devices: Titanium grey, blue, and red. A bright white LED status indicator provides at-a-glance charge capacity information, as well as a low-charge caution to keep users informed.

Quick and Efficient Charging

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The X7000 includes two USB ports, providing a total output of 2.4A output as needed by connected devices. The dual ports allow users to charge two mobile devices simultaneously, saving precious time. Additionally, the 7000mAh device can fully recharge a smart phone three times and a tablet one time. Now you can have enough power to watch and shoot videos on the mobile device, take photos and surf social networks, all the long.

Built Durable Inside Out

ADATA makes safety the leading priority with all products, and more so with power banks. Meticulous circuit and wire engineering provides six-faceted protection against excessive heat, voltage, current, charge, and discharge. Externally, the shell uses tough, fire-resistant polycarbonate that has been IEC 60950 impact resistant-certified for safe portability in diverse environments.

 

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The Pokeball Power Bank (1st & 2nd Generation) Review

This is a guest review by Emperor Zensekai.

 

Purchasing The Pokeball Power Banks

There are apparently three “generations” of Pokeball power banks (portable phone chargers) available online. I purchased the first and second generation Pokeball power banks off Amazon, which I will be reviewing here. I did not purchase the third generation “Pikachu Projection Pokeball”, which costs US$15-20 more than the other two models.

The Gen 1 Pokeball power bank was supposed to arrive a day earlier, but it got delayed due to a shipping error. That was just one bump in my epic quest to get one of these Pokeball power banks. I actually had to cancel and get a refund for two other Pokeball power banks I purchased from other e-commerce websites, because I did not receive them even after waiting for 1.5 months!

Word of advice : Don’t bother with the power banks that promise 20,000+ mAh. Chances are you will never get it.

I actually bought both of these Pokeball power banks to hedge my bets. I figured that there was a good chance that either one would never make it, or break soon after I receive them… and I would have to get another refund.

 

The Two Pokeball Power Bank Models

Both the Gen 1 and Gen 2 Pokeball power banks are about the same price, ~US$20.

The Gen 1 Pokeball power bank has four “slits” that light up, with the USB port is in the center. It has a rated battery capacity of 10,000 mAh.

The Gen 2 Pokeball power bank looks more like a Pokeball, with a rim light and two USB ports. It has a rated battery capacity of 12,000 mAh.

From the research I ended up doing to figure all this out, there are real inconsistencies amongst the sellers. I don’t suggest that you buy any that aren’t fulfilled by Amazon themselves!

There seems to be a ⅓ to ¼ failure rate from the reviews I read on these power banks. Some of them may be due to the lack of an instruction manual though, as I will details below.

 

First Impressions

The Gen 1 seller went out of their way to properly secure the Pokeball power bank in the box. They even tossed in a cute Pokeball keychain!

The packaging for the Gen 2 Pokeball power bank was bad though. The box inside the package had come over, and the power bank was halfway out of it.

The Gen 1 Pokeball power bank looked as advertised, but the the rim lighting of the Gen 2 Pokeball power bank was nowhere near as bright as seen in the advertised pictures!

 

Using The Pokeball Power Banks

I prefer the look and feel of the Gen 2 model, but it was very hard to get the USB cable into the socket. It was also heavier than the Gen 1 model, which makes questing for Pokemons with this attached harder… because I have physical issues. However, it is still my favourite of the two.

Getting these power banks is a nightmare, but the part that worries me the most is the lack of instruction manuals in both models. The Gen 1 model has very brief instructions in broken English on the side of the box. The Gen 2 model came with no instructions at all.

Check out the “all your base are belong to us” type of English instructions provided with the Gen 1 Pokeball power bank :

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  • It means full of charge when four lamps are fully berght [sic] and not flashing.
  • Need to keep the battery when not in use for a longtime [sic].

I assume that means you have to keep the battery charged if you are not going to use it for weeks. I also assume that this applies to both Pokeball power banks.

Unfortunately, there is no way to know if either Pokeball power bank can be damaged by overcharging, or if they have an automatic cut-off built-in. Thankfully, the light pattern on the Gen 2 model is very apparent when you recharge it. It’s much harder to tell the charge level of the Gen 1 model.

 

My Verdict

I’m really excited about these Pokeball power banks, and I like them a lot. I just had to do a ton of research to get them.

I think some of the bad reviews on these power banks are due to the lack of an instruction manual on how to use and maintain them. They are not intuitive to the average American who’s used to buying and using products from top-tier companies like Apple and Sony.

You have to be somewhat mindful of these no-brand electronics. I’m relatively certain that if I drop them on a hard floor from six feet or so, they would be damaged. Or if you left one charging for extended periods of time.

Oddly, neither power bank came with any USB cable. You will need to purchase a USB-to-micro USB cable, commonly used by Android smartphones, to recharge it. You can use the same cable to recharge your Android smartphone. You will need a separate Lightning cable for these power banks to recharge your iPhones or iPads.

Overall, I really like these Pokeball power banks. US$20-25 is a fair price for either models. I personally prefer the Gen. 2 model. Finally, I can farm Pokeballs at Pokestops without running low on battery, and do it in proper Pokemon style!

 

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