Tag Archives: Battery

Apple Watch Explodes, Apple Tries To Cover It Up!

Apple Watch Explodes, Apple Tries To Cover It Up!

An Apple Watch Series 7 exploded recently, and Apple tried to cover it up. Maybe that’s why there’s not much uproar over it!

 

Apple Watch Explodes, Apple Tries To Cover It Up!

An Apple Watch Series 7 user recently reported to 9to5Mac that his smartwatch overheated, started smoking and eventually exploded!

The user recently noticed that his smartwatch was getting much hotter than usual, and that the back of the Apple Watch Series 7 had cracked.

watchOS also started showing a warning about needing to shut down due to the high temperature. This happened while he was in his own home where the temperature was just over 70°F / 21°C.

He immediately called Apple Support, and his call got escalated through multiple levels, eventually landing in the hands of a manager who told him not to touch the watch until he heard back from them.

The next morning, the Apple Watch was even hotter to the touch, and the heat actually shattered its display!

When he picked it up to take photos to send to Apple Support, it started making “crackling sounds” and “exploded” just as he threw it out the window.

The exploding Apple Watch Series 7 left burn marks on his couch, and he visited the hospital emergency room out of an abundance of caution over the potential of lead poisoning from the burning Apple Watch.

When he reached out to Apple, he was told that his case was a “top priority”, and that he would receive an update by the “following Monday”. Apparently, it wasn’t top priority enough to deal on a weekend…

Eventually, he waited until Wednesday, October 5, 2022, to hear back from Apple – it arranged to pick up the Apple Watch for further tests in its labs.

Apple also sent him a document asking him to agree not to share his experience with anyone. Fortunately, the Apple Watch user declined to sign the document, so he could share his story. Otherwise, we would never have known about an Apple Watch Series 7 exploding!

 

Apple Watch Explodes vs. Samsung Phone Batteries Bloating

It is inevitable that comparisons will be made between this story of an Apple Watch actually exploding, and the recent complaints by influencers that their Samsung phone batteries were bloating.

First, let me point out that in both cases, we cannot determine cause and effect merely from a few cases (in the saga of bloating Samsung batteries) or one case (this example of an exploding Apple Watch).

Apple sold over 100 million Apple Watch models since December 2020, and Samsung sells over 270 million smartphones every year. So it is important to frame both incidences in that context.

While exploding or bloating batteries are a real danger that we must all be aware of, it is an unavoidable risk of using lithium-ion battery technology.

When the drama over bloating Samsung batteries first exploded (pun intended!), many people asked me for my opinion as I too have many smartphones that I keep for comparison tests.

I shared that so far, the only Samsung phone to bloat was an old Galaxy S7 edge from 2017, and many other smartphones from ASUS, Xiaomi, etc. have bloated on me. In fact, a realme smartphone is slowly splitting itself in two from a battery bloat in front of me right now.

So it isn’t exactly a “brand problem”. In fact, the worst brand for battery bloating in my personal experience is Apple. My 15-inch MacBook Pro suffered no less than THREE (3) sets of bloated batteries in just 3 years. So Apple fans really should not laugh at other brands over battery issues.

All lithium-ion batteries have an innate risk of bloating, catching fire, or even exploding. That is something we must all acknowledge.

Read more : Did Exploding Samsung Smartphones Kill 3 In Florida?

Of course, better design decisions and stringent quality control can greatly reduce, but not eliminate, the risk of such dangerous incidences. When hundreds of millions of lithium-powered devices are being manufactured every year, it is inevitable that many of them will bloat after some time, and a few will catch fire and may even explode.

That is why airlines forbid travellers from storing lithium-ion batteries, or devices with lithium-ion batteries, in their check-in luggage. That’s to ensure that if a fire does break out, it would be noticeable to the cabin crew, and can be tackled quickly.

What is most concerning though what happens when companies are made aware of battery issues. Do they take you seriously and treat you right? Or do they try to shut you up, to protect their reputation and sales?

What Samsung did was assuring, but probably only because they learned their lesson from the Galaxy Note7 battery saga. Apple did not suffer through such a traumatic event, and it shows.

Perhaps they should go through a similarly traumatic experience. Then maybe they will treat their customers a little better. The way they treated me when I reported my MacBook Pro’s bloated batteries is why I steadfastly refuse to ever consider buying an iPhone.

And trying to cover up this case of an Apple Watch exploding? That’s just not right…

 

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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 : Battery Life + Charging Speed!

Take a look at the battery recharging speed of the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4, and find out how its two refresh rate options affect its battery life!

 

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 : Refresh Rate Affects Battery Life!

The new Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 offers two refresh rate options (Settings > Display > Motion smoothness) :

  • Adaptive : Get smoother animation and scrolling by automatically adjusting your screen refresh rate up to 120 Hz
  • Standard : Get longer battery life with a 60 Hz screen refresh rate

The Adaptive mode dynamically refreshes its main, foldable display between 1 Hz and 120 Hz.

By default, the Galaxy Z Flip4 uses the Adaptive mode, for smoother graphics, but you can choose to switch to the Standard mode for longer battery.

In the next section, we will look at how the two refresh rate options affect the Galaxy Z Flip4’s battery life.

Read more : Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4: Unboxing + First Impressions!

 

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 : Battery Life Comparison!

The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 comes with a larger 3,700 mAh battery, which is 400 mAh (12%) larger than last year’s Galaxy Z Flip3.

To test its battery life, we turned off Automatic Brightness, and set its display brightness to 50%.

Why 50%? That is actually slightly higher than the average indoor brightness level of 40% during the day, and is what we usually use in all our mobile battery life tests.

It is important to fix the brightness level, to make sure the screen brightness does not change as the ambient brightness changes.

We then ran the PCMark Work 3.0 battery life test until its battery capacity dropped to 20% several times, and this was the best result we obtained with the Standard and Adaptive refresh rates :

Will you look at that! The battery life for both options are now much closer than with the Z Flip3!

The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 has a battery life of just over 9 hours with Adaptive refresh rate enabled, and 10.25 hours with the Standard refresh rate!

Let’s compare its battery life at 60 Hz and 120 Hz, against the S22 Ultra, S21 Ultra and Z Flip 3 smartphones.

Standard Refresh Rate (60 Hz)

The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 naturally has the best battery life with the refresh rate set to 60 Hz.

But what’s really important to note here is that it is as power-efficient as the Galaxy S22 Ultra, about 10% more efficient than the Z Flip3, and 18% more efficient than the S21 Ultra!

Work 3.0 S22 Ultra Z Flip4 Z Flip 3 S21 Ultra
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 3,700 mAh 3,300 mAh 5,000 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs 15 mins 10 hrs
14 mins
8 hrs 11 mins 11 hrs 22 mins
Utilisation
per min.
4.68 mAh 4.82 mAh 5.38 mAh 5.87 mAh

Adaptive Refresh Rate (120 Hz)

While the Galaxy Z Flip4 looks like the Z Flip 3, its energy efficiency was greatly improved to the point that the Adaptive refresh rate is really usable for most people!

Turning on adaptive refresh increase the Z Flip4’s power consumption by just 11%, giving you a very usable battery life of 9 hours 12 minutes!

That makes the Galaxy Z Flip4 about 14.5% more efficient than the S22 Ultra, 16% more efficient than the S21 Ultra, and 18% more efficient than the Z Flip3.

Work 3.0 Z Flip4 S22 Ultra S21 Ultra
Z Flip 3
Battery Capacity 3,700 mAh 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 3,300 mAh
Battery Life 9 hrs
12 mins
10 hrs
38 mins
10 hrs
26 mins
6 hrs
44 mins
Utilisation
per min.
5.36 mAh 6.27 mAh 6.39 mAh 6.53 mAh

 

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 : Battery Recharging Speed!

The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 supports up to 20 watts of wired fast charging, but unfortunately, does not come with the charger in-the-box.

So we relied on the standard 15 watt Samsung fast charger than shipped with their previous smartphones – something we believe most users will end up doing.

But we used the 25 watt charger for the S21 Ultra, because it came with that charger.

Work 3.0 S21 Ultra S22 Ultra Z Flip 3 Z Flip 4
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 3,300 mAh 3,700 mAh
Charger Output 25 watts 15 watts 15 watts 15 watts
Battery Life 64 minutes 64.5 minutes 88.5 minutes 98.75 minutes
Recharging Speed
(per minute)
62.5 mAh 62.0 mAh 29.8 mAh 30.0 mAh

Samsung appears to intentionally reduce the charging speed for their foldable Z Flip3 and Z Flip4 smartphones, probably to avoid producing excessive heat.

Hence they both recharge twice as slowly as the S22 Ultra, even using the same 15 watt charger!

Because of its larger battery, the Galaxy Z Flip4 fully recharges from 20% to 100% in just over 1.5 hours with the standard 15 watt Samsung charger.

That gives us a battery life to recharging time ratio of about 6.22:1, which is pretty decent. You get about an hour’s worth of battery life for every 10 minutes of recharge.

 

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 : Price + Availability

The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 4 comes in four colour options, as well as a special Bespoke Edition :

  • Graphite – legacy colour
  • Pink Gold – new colour
  • Blue – new colour
  • Bora Purple – their signature colour this year

These are the available models and launch prices for the Z Flip 4 :

  • 8 GB + 128 GB : RM4,099 (about US$920 / £760 / A$1,319 / S$1,267)
  • 8 GB + 256 GB : RM4,399 (about US$987 / £816 / A$1,415 / S$1,359)
  • 8 GB + 256 GB Bespoke Edition : RM4,599 (about US$1,032 / £853 / A$1,479 / S$1,421)
  • 8 GB + 512 GB : RM4,899 (about US$ 1,099 / £909 / A$1,576 / S$1,514)

The Bespoke Edition is only available on the Samsung website, and requires 3-4 weeks to deliver, as each unit is custom-made.

Here are online purchase options :

Read more : Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 4 : Colour Comparison!

 

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Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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EBL 8-Bay Lithium-Ion Charger + AA Batteries Review!

In my review of the EBL lithium-ion AA batteries and 8-bay charger, I will share with you why this is the future of AA batteries!

 

EBL 8-Bay Lithium-Ion Charger + AA Batteries Review!

The future of AA batteries is here, and it comes in the form of EBL lithium-ion AA batteries, and the 8-bay Li-Ion battery charger!

Most of us have long relied on rechargeable AA batteries using NiCad (Nickel-Cadmium) and NiMH (Nickel-Metal Hydride) technologies which were developed in the 1980s.

They are set to be replaced by AA batteries built on lithium-ion technology – the same kind of battery used in your smartphone and laptops.

So I was most excited when EBL said that they would send me their latest lithium-ion AA batteries and 8-bay Li-Ion battery charger to try out.

 

EBL 8-Bay Lithium-Ion Charger + AA Batteries : What’s In The Box?

EBL sent me their most popular AA battery bundle, which consists of an 8-bay Li-Ion battery charger, and eight of their lithium-ion AA batteries. They also offer them for sale as separate items.

The package arrived in a simple black plastic bag – there is no special bundle packaging. EBL would do well to add bubble wrapping to prevent damage to the box, and pilfering from the package.

There are the items that you will receive if you purchase the EBL 8-bay Li-Ion battery charger and 8-battery bundle :

  • 1 x EBL 8-bay Lithium-Ion Battery Charger
  • 1 set of EBL Lithium-Ion Battery Charger + Lithium Ion Battery manuals
  • 1 x USB Type A to micro-USB Type B power cable
  • 8 x EBL Lithium-Ion AA batteries
  • 2 x AA battery storage cases

 

EBL 8-Bay Lithium-Ion Charger Review!

The EBL 8-Bay lithium-ion charger has a pretty simple design. It has 8 battery bays, supporting up to eight AA or AAA lithium-ion batteries, or a mix of them.

However, please note that this charger only supports lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. Please do not use it to recharge your NiCd / NiMH rechargeable batteries!

Every bay has a separate circuit, allowing for optimal charging according to each battery’s condition. It is also smart enough to prevent over-charging, over-voltage, over-current and overheating while charging.

That said, EBL recommends that you take out the batteries once they are fully-charged, and do not leave them in the charger. Trickle-charging lithium-ion batteries is not good for their lifespan.

I would also recommend that you disconnect the charger after use, because it will use up to 0.3 watts of power even when it’s not charging any battery. That “vampire power loss” may seem little, but it is still a waste of power.

Power input comes through the very common Type A to micro-USB cable. In 2022, I would have very much preferred a bidirectional USB Type C connector. But this is a minor inconvenience – you won’t generally remove the cable unless you are travelling.

The 8-bay charger has a 10 watt power input, delivering up to 1.25 watts per bay when fully-loaded with eight batteries, and up to 1.5 watt per bay with fewer batteries.

However, EBL does not provide a 10 watt USB power adaptor to actually power this 8-bay lithium-ion battery charger. So you will need to purchase a separate USB power adaptor, or use the one that came with your smartphone.

Just make sure the USB power adaptor can deliver 10 watts or more. Otherwise, charging will be much slower.

Specifications EBL 8-Bay Lithium-Ion Charger
Model EBL M7012
Type USB Charger
Battery Size AA / AAA
Battery Type Only 1.5V Lithium-Ion
Input Voltage DC 5V @ 2A
Input Power 10 W
No-Load Input Power 0.3 W max.
Output Voltage DC 1.5 V @ 1 A
Output Current AA : 1000 mA max.
AAA : 500 mA max.
Dimensions 126.4 mm wide
75.4 mm high
25.2 mm thick
Weight 94.9 grams

 

EBL 8-Bay Lithium-Ion AA Batteries Review!

The EBL lithium-ion AA batteries work like any other rechargeable AA batteries. Just plug them into any device that requires AA batteries, and they just work.

These lithium-ion batteries have a capacity of 3,000 mWh, which is equivalent to 2,000 mAh. So they are equivalent in capacity to many NiMH batteries, but about 18% lower than top-shelf Eneloop Pro batteries.

EBL claims that they have a low self-discharge like Eneloop batteries, and will retain up to 80% of its capacity 3 years after it’s fully-charged. But they do not come pre-charged, because so you will need to charge them for 6-8 hours before using them.

The biggest advantage of the EBL lithium-ion AA battery though is its ability to deliver 1.5 volts of constant current. This beats NiCad and NiMH batteries which are limited to just 1.2-1.4 volts.

Even though these batteries have similar capacities to NiCad/NiMH batteries, their higher voltage means they deliver 7% to 25% more power.

That extra power is useful when it comes to certain devices, like Nerf guns or electric toothbrushes for example. You will get higher performance with these 1.5 volt lithium-ion batteries than you would with NiCad / NiMH batteries.

Specifications EBL Lithium-Ion AA Battery
Size AA
Type Lithium-Ion
Capacity 3000 mWh
2000 mAh
Discharge Voltage 1.5 V ± 2%
Low Voltage
Warning
1.1 V ± 2%
Standard Charging Time ≤ 2.5 hours
Standard Discharge Time ≥ 5 hours
Charging Voltage 5.0 V ~ 5.5 V
Recommended
Discharge Current
0.2 C (400 mA)
Maximum
Discharge Current
1 C
Overcurrent
Protection Limit
800 mA
Overcurrent Discharge
/ Short Circuit Limit
2.1 A ~ 2.8 A
Low Temperature
Charging Protection
0 ℃ : ≤ 150 mA
-10 ℃ : ≤ 100 mA
Static Power Consumption ≤ 100 μA
Dimensions 50.1 mm tall
14.1 mm wide
Weight 20 grams

 

EBL 8-Bay Lithium-Ion Charger + AA Batteries : Price + Availability

The EBL 8-Bay lithium-ion charger can be purchased separately, or together with AA batteries, at these official price points :

  • 8-Bay Lithium-Ion Charger + 8 AA batteries : US$45.99
  • 8-Bay Lithium-Ion Charger only : US$13.59
  • 8 x Lithium-Ion AA Batteries : US$28.99

Here are some online purchase options :

  • EBL Direct : $45.99 (use Welcome for 10% off)
  • Amazon : $45.99

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Samsung Galaxy A73 Battery Life + Recharging Speed!

Take a look at the Samsung Galaxy A73 smartphone’s battery recharging speed, and find out how its two refresh rate options affect its battery life!

 

Samsung Galaxy A73 : Refresh Rate Options Affect Battery Life

The Samsung Galaxy A73 smartphone offers two refresh rate options (Settings > Display > Motion smoothness) :

  • High : Get smoother animations and scrolling with a 120 Hz screen refresh rate
  • Standard : Get longer battery life with a 60 Hz screen refresh rate

You may think that this is similar to the Galaxy S22 Ultra’s 120 Hz display, but you would be wrong.

The Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra has an Adaptive mode that dynamically refreshes between 1 Hz and 120 Hz for better battery life.

The 120 Hz refresh rate option in the Galaxy A73 is fixed at 120 Hz. This guarantees you an ultra-smooth 120 Hz refresh rate all the time, at the expense of battery life.

In the next section, we will look at how the two refresh rate options affect the Galaxy A73 smartphone’s battery life.

Read more : Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra Review : Our Editor’s Choice!
Read more : Samsung Galaxy A73 Unboxing + Hands-On Preview!

 

Samsung Galaxy A73 : Battery Life Comparison!

The Samsung Galaxy A73 comes with a large 5,000 mAh battery, which is the same size as the Galaxy S22 Ultra’s battery!

To test its battery life, we turned off Automatic Brightness, and set its display brightness to 50%.

Why 50%? That is actually slightly higher than the average indoor brightness level of 40% during the day, and is what we usually use in all our mobile battery life tests.

It is important to fix the brightness level, to make sure the screen brightness does not change as the ambient brightness changes.

We then ran the PCMark Work 3.0 battery life test until its battery capacity dropped to 20% several times, and this was the best result we obtained with 60 Hz and 120 Hz refresh rates :

Look at that! The Samsung Galaxy A73 has a long battery life of 10.75 hours with High refresh rate enabled, and lasts 13 hours with the Standard refresh rate!

That means it has the same battery life as the Galaxy S22 Ultra with the 120 Hz refresh rate, but one hour shorter battery life at 60 Hz.

That’s the advantage of the S22 Ultra’s more efficient 4nm processor, but then again – the S22 Ultra costs a lot more than the A73!

Standard Refresh Rate (60 Hz)

The Samsung Galaxy A73 delivers the best battery life with the Standard refresh rate of 60 Hz, offering just over 13 hours of non-stop use.

The Galaxy A73 consumed 13% less power than the S21 Ultra, but 9% more power than the S22 Ultra.

Work 3.0 S22 Ultra
(60 Hz)
A73 (60 Hz) S21 Ultra
(60 Hz)
Display Size 6.8-inch 6.7-inch 6.8-inch
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs 15 mins 13 hrs 4 mins 11 hrs 22 mins
Utilisation
per min.
4.68 mAh 5.10 mAh 5.87 mAh

High Refresh Rate (120 Hz)

Switching on the High refresh rate of 120 Hz cut its battery life by 18% – almost 2.5 hours!

But Galaxy A73 has pretty much the same battery life as the S22 Ultra, and last year’s S21 Ultra.

Work 3.0 A73 (120 Hz) S22 Ultra
(120 Hz)
S21 Ultra
(120 Hz)
Display Size 6.7-inch 6.8-inch 6.8-inch
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh
Battery Life 10 hrs 42 mins 10 hrs 38 mins 10 hrs 26 mins
Utilisation
per min.
6.23 mAh 6.27 mAh 6.39 mAh

 

Samsung Galaxy A73 : Battery Recharging Speed!

The Samsung Galaxy A73 supports up to 25 watts of wired fast charging, but unfortunately, does not come with the charger in-the-box.

So we relied on the standard 15 watt Samsung fast charger than shipped with their previous smartphones and tablets – something we believe most users will end up doing.

Recharging Speed S21 Ultra S22 Ultra A73
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh
Charger Output 25 watts 15 watts 15 watts
Battery Life 64 minutes 64.5 minutes 85 minutes
Recharging Speed
(per minute)
62.5 mAh 62.0 mAh 47.0 mAh

Despite having the same capacity battery as the Galaxy S22 Ultra, and using the same recycled 15 watt charger, the Galaxy A73 recharged about 25% slower.

That shows that even though their batteries have the same capacities, they are built differently, allowing for faster charging on the Galaxy S22 Ultra.

That said – the Galaxy A73 was no slouch, taking less than 1.5 hours to fully recharge from 20% to 100%.

 

Samsung Galaxy A73 Colour + Availability!

Here in Malaysia, the Galaxy A73 smartphone is available in three colour options :

  • Awesome White
  • Awesome Mint
  • Awesome Gray

It will be offered in only one variant, at this price point :

  • 8 GB + 256 GB : RM 2,099 (about US$499 / £379 / A$679 / S$679)

Here are some online purchase options :

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra Battery Life + Recharging Speed!

Take a look at the Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra’s battery recharging speed, and how its two refresh rate options affect its battery life!

 

Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra : Two Refresh Rate Options

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra tablet offers two refresh rate options (Settings > Display > Motion smoothness) :

  • High : Get smoother animations and scrolling with a 120 Hz screen refresh rate
  • Standard : Get longer battery life with a 60 Hz screen refresh rate

You may think that this is similar to the Galaxy S22 Ultra’s 120 Hz display, but you would be wrong.

The Galaxy S22 Ultra has an Adaptive mode that dynamically refreshes between 1 Hz and 120 Hz for better battery life.

The 120 Hz refresh rate option in the Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra is fixed at 120 Hz. This guarantees you an ultra-smooth 120 Hz refresh rate all the time, at the expense of battery life.

In the next section, we will look at how the two refresh rate options affect the Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra’s battery life.

Read more : Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra : Hands-On Experience!
Read more : Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra Unboxing : What’s Inside?

 

Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra : Battery Life Comparison!

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra comes with a massive 11,200 mAh battery, which is more than the size of the Galaxy S22 Ultra’s battery!

To test its battery life, we turned off Automatic Brightness, and set its display brightness to 50%.

Why 50%? That is actually slightly higher than the average indoor brightness level of 40% during the day, and is what we usually use in all our mobile battery life tests.

It is important to fix the brightness level, to make sure the screen brightness does not change as the ambient brightness changes.

We then ran the PCMark Work 3.0 battery life test until its battery capacity dropped to 20% several times, and this was the best result we obtained with 60 Hz and 120 Hz refresh rates :

Astoundingly, the Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra only has a battery life of 6.5 hours with High refresh rate enabled, and a more acceptable 8 hours with the Standard refresh rate!

This is a slight improvement over last year’s Galaxy Tab S7 Plus. There is no doubt that its much larger 14.6-inch Super AMOLED display is a significant drain on battery life.

Let’s compare its battery life against the Galaxy Tab S7 Plus, and the Galaxy S22 Ultra smartphone which uses the same Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 mobile SoC.

Standard Refresh Rate (60 Hz)

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra delivers the best battery life with the Standard refresh rate of 60 Hz.

The Tab S8 Ultra appears to use 9% more power than the Tab S7 Plus, but I have to point out that it has a 39% larger display.

Fortunately, the battery life deficit is “covered” by its 11% larger battery.

Work 3.0 S22 Ultra
(60 Hz)
Tab S7 Plus
(60 Hz)
Tab S8 Ultra
(60 Hz)
Display Size 6.8-inch 12.4-inch 14.6-inch
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 10,090 mAh 11,200 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs 15 mins 7 hrs 55 mins 8 hrs
3 mins
Utilisation
per min.
4.68 mAh 16.99 mAh 18.55 mAh

High Refresh Rate (120 Hz)

Switching on the High refresh rate of 120 Hz cut its battery life by 17.6% – almost 1.5 hours!

But the data shows that its larger 14.6-inch display only used 3.4% more power than the Tab S7 Plus.

Work 3.0 S22 Ultra
(120 Hz)
Tab S7 Plus
(120 Hz)
Tab S8 Ultra
(120 Hz)
Display Size 6.8-inch 12.4-inch 14.6-inch
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 10,090 mAh 11,200 mAh
Battery Life 10 hrs
38 mins
6 hrs
11 mins
6 hrs
38 mins
Utilisation
per min.
6.27 mAh 21.76 mAh 22.51 mAh

 

Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra : Battery Recharging Speed!

The Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra supports up to 45 watts of wired fast charging, but unfortunately, does not come with the charger in-the-box.

So we relied on the standard 15 watt Samsung fast charger than shipped with their previous smartphones and tablets – something we believe most users will end up doing.

Recharging Speed Tab S8 Ultra Tab S7 Plus S22 Ultra
Display Size 14.6-inch 12.4-inch 6.8-inch
Battery Capacity 11,200 mAh 10,090 mAh 5,000 mAh
Charger Output 15 watts 15 watts 15 watts
Battery Life 86.5 mins 86 mins 64.5 mins
Recharging Speed
(per minute)
103.6 mAh 93.9 mAh 62.0 mAh

Interestingly, the Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra recharged faster with a standard 15 watt charger, than the Tab S7 Plus or even the Galaxy S22 Ultra!

This is really good news. It means that Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra owners need not worry too much about its recharging speed with the older 15 watt chargers.

In fact, you don’t need to splurge on a new 45 watt fast charger. The Tab S8 Ultra fully recharges its massive battery from 20% to 100% in just under 1.5 hours with the standard 15 watt Samsung charger!

 

Samsung Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra : Price + Availability

Samsung is offering the Galaxy Tab S8 Ultra in five RAM + storage capacity options globally :

  • 8 GB + 128 GB
  • 12 GB + 256 GB / 512 GB
  • 16 GB + 256 GB / 512 GB

But over here in Malaysia, it is available with 12 GB RAM and 256 GB storage for RM 5,899 (about US$1,387 / £1,063 / A$1,877 / S$1,892.

Here are some online pre-order options :

 

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Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra : Battery Life + Recharging Speed!

Take a look at the Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra’s battery recharging speed, and how its two refresh rate options affect its battery life!

 

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra : Refresh Rate Affects Battery Life!

The new Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra offers two refresh rate options (Settings > Display > Motion smoothness) :

  • Adaptive : Get smoother animation and scrolling by automatically adjusting your screen refresh rate up to 120 Hz
  • Standard : Get longer battery life with a 60 Hz screen refresh rate

Last year’s Galaxy S21 Ultra also has an Adaptive mode, which dynamically refreshes between 10 Hz and 120 Hz

The new Galaxy S22 Ultra improves on that, with an Adaptive mode that dynamically refreshes between 1 Hz and 120 Hz.

By default, the Galaxy S22 Ultra uses the Adaptive mode, for smoother graphics, but you can choose to switch to the Standard mode for longer battery.

In the next section, we will look at how the two refresh rate options affect the Galaxy S22 Ultra’s battery life.

Read more : Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra : Our Hands-On Experience!
Read more : How To Setup Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra For The First Time!

 

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra : Battery Life Comparison!

The Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra comes with a larger 5,000 mAh battery, which is the same size as last year’s Galaxy S21 Ultra.

To test its battery life, we turned off Automatic Brightness, and set its display brightness to 50%.

Why 50%? That is actually slightly higher than the average indoor brightness level of 40% during the day, and is what we usually use in all our mobile battery life tests.

It is important to fix the brightness level, to make sure the screen brightness does not change as the ambient brightness changes.

We then ran the PCMark Work 3.0 battery life test until its battery capacity dropped to 20% several times, and this was the best result we obtained with 60 Hz and 120 Hz refresh rates :

Will you look at that!

The Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra has a battery life of 10.5 hours with Adaptive refresh rate enabled, and a whopping 14.25 hours with the Standard refresh rate!

But let’s compare its battery life at 60 Hz and 120 Hz, against the S21 Ultra and Z Flip 3 smartphones.

Standard Refresh Rate (60 Hz)

The Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra really shines with the refresh rate set to 60 Hz.

The S22 Ultra used 20% less power per minute, which delivered 25% longer battery life than the S21 Ultra.

Work 3.0 S22 Ultra
(60 Hz)
Z Flip 3
(60 Hz)
S21 Ultra
(60 Hz)
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 3,300 mAh 5,000 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs
15 mins
8 hrs 11 mins 11 hrs 22 mins
Utilisation
per min.
4.68 mAh 5.38 mAh 5.87 mAh

Adaptive Refresh Rate (120 Hz)

While the Galaxy S22 Ultra certainly used less power than the S21 Ultra, that advantage was greatly diminished with the Adaptive refresh rate enabled.

The S22 Ultra used just 2% less power per minute, which delivered 2% (12 minutes) longer battery life than the S21 Ultra.

Work 3.0 S22 Ultra
(120 Hz)
S21 Ultra
(120 Hz)
Z Flip 3
(120 Hz)
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 3,300 mAh
Battery Life 10 hrs
38 mins
10 hrs
26 mins
6 hrs
44 mins
Utilisation
per min.
6.27 mAh 6.39 mAh 6.53 mAh

 

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra : Battery Recharging Speed!

The Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra supports up to 45 watts of wired fast charging, but unfortunately, does not come with the charger in-the-box.

So we relied on the standard 15 watt Samsung fast charger than shipped with their previous smartphones – something we believe most users will end up doing.

But we used the 25 watt charger for the S21 Ultra, because it came with that charger.

Work 3.0 S21 Ultra S22 Ultra Z Flip 3
Battery Capacity 5,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 3,300 mAh
Charger Output 25 watts 15 watts 15 watts
Battery Life 64 minutes 64.5 minutes 88.5 minutes
Recharging Speed
(per minute)
62.5 mAh 62.0 mAh 29.8 mAh

Interestingly, the Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra recharged as quickly with a standard 15 watt charger, as the S21 Ultra with its more powerful 25 watt charger!

In fact, the Galaxy S22 Ultra recharged itself twice as fast as the Galaxy Z Flip 3, even though they both used the same 15 watt charger!

This is really good news. It means that Galaxy S22 Ultra owners need not worry too much about its recharging speed with the older 15 watt chargers.

In fact, you don’t really need to splurge on a new 45 watt fast charger. The Galaxy S22 Ultra fully recharges from 20% to 100% in just over an hour with the standard 15 watt Samsung charger!

 

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra : Price + Availability

Samsung is offering the Galaxy S22 Ultra in four colour options – Burgundy, Green, Phantom Black and Phantom White.

I had the opportunity to attend an exclusive Samsung preview event, to check out all four colours for ourselves.

Note : Samsung only allowed us to use digital cameras, so the video is not stabilised as it would be with smartphones that I generally use.

Here in Malaysia, it is available starting 10 February 2022 in three variants, at these price points :

  • 8 GB + 128 GB : RM 5,099 (about US$1,219 / £899 / A$1,699 / S$1,629)
  • 12 GB + 256 GB : RM 5,499 (about US$1,314 / £969 / A$1,829 / S$1,759)
  • 12 GB + 512 GB : RM 5,899 (about US$1,409 / £1,039 / A$1,959 / S$1,889)

Here are some online options :

 

Please Support My Work!

Support my work through a bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card!

Name : Adrian Wong
Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra Battery Life Comparison

The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra comes with a large 4,500 mAh battery, but how long does it really last at 120 Hz, or at full display resolution?

We put the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra through the paces, and compared it to a few other devices in our lab. Check out the results!

 

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra : Battery Life Considerations

The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra comes with a 4,500 mAh battery, which is just a little larger than the Galaxy Note 10+‘s 4,300 mAh battery.

On paper, this should give it a little more battery life than the Galaxy Note 10+. But the Note 20 Ultra is also the first Note to feature a 120 Hz display.

120 Hz Refresh Rate

A higher refresh rate will give you a smoother display, at the expense of higher power consumption and consequently, lower battery life.

That’s why Samsung doesn’t keep the display running at 120 Hz all the time. Instead, they offer an Adaptive option, doubling the refresh rate to 120 Hz only when it’s “necessary”.

WQHD+ Resolution

The other “trick” that Samsung uses to keep power consumption lower is to use a lower display resolution by default – FHD+ (1080 x 2316 pixels).

You can switch to the full WQHD+ resolution of 1440 x 3088 pixels, but that will increase power consumption and reduce battery life, because the GPU has to process more pixels.

Note : The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra only supports 120 Hz at the FHD+ or HD+ resolutions. Switching to WQHD+ limits you to just 60 Hz.

Let’s find out exactly how much both display options affect the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra‘s battery life!

 

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra Battery Life Comparison

To test the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra‘s battery life, we turned off Automatic Brightness, and set its display brightness to 50%.

Why 50%? That is actually slightly higher than the average indoor brightness level of 40% during the day, and is what we usually use in all our mobile battery life tests.

It is important to fix the brightness level, to make sure the screen brightness does not change as the ambient brightness changes.

We then ran the PCMark Work 2.0 battery life test until its battery capacity dropped to 20% several times, and picked the best result.

Resolution + Refresh Rate Comparison

First, we started with a resolution and refresh rate comparison. The

Work 2.0 FHD+ (60 Hz) WQHD+ (60 Hz) FHD+ (120 Hz)
Battery Capacity 4,500 mAh 4,500 mAh 4,500 mAh
Battery Life 10 hrs 9 mins 9 hrs 17 mins 7 hrs 34 mins
Battery Utilisation 5.91 mAh / min. 6.46 mAh / min. 7.93 mAh / min.

The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra has pretty good battery life of just over 10 hours, but only if you keep it at the default FHD+ resolution and use the standard 60 Hz refresh rate.

Increasing the display resolution to WQHD+ reduced battery life by 52 minutes, or about 8.5%. Not too bad, since you still get 9+ hours.

Switching to Adaptive mode though will drastically reduce battery life by a whopping 155 minutes, which is a full quarter less than its maximum battery life!

Full HD+ Resolution @ 60 Hz

Battery
Performance
MatePad Pro Black Shark
2 Pro
S20 Ultra
(FHD 60Hz)
Galaxy
Note10+
Galaxy
S10+
Note20 Ultra
(FHD 60Hz)
Capacity 7,250 mAh 4,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 4,300 mAh 4,100 mAh 4,500 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs 1 min 12 hrs 25 mins 11 hrs 32 mins 10 hrs 32 mins 10 hrs 17 mins 10 hrs 9 mins
Utilisation
Per Min.
6.90 mAh 4.30 mAh 5.78 mAh 5.44 mAh 5.32 mAh 5.91 mAh
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Even with its slightly larger battery, the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra has a slightly shorter battery life than the Galaxy Note 10+.

It even has a shorter battery life than the Galaxy S10+, which has a 10% smaller battery.

WQHD+ Resolution @ 60 Hz

Battery
Performance
MatePad Pro Black Shark
2 Pro
S20 Ultra
(WQHD 60Hz)
Galaxy
Note10+
Galaxy
S10+
Note20 Ultra
(WQHD 60Hz)
Capacity 7,250 mAh 4,000 mAh 5,000 mAh 4,300 mAh 4,100 mAh 4,500 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs 1 min 12 hrs 25 mins 10 hrs 54 mins 10 hrs 32 mins 10 hrs 17 mins 9 hrs 17 mins
Utilisation
Per Min.
6.90 mAh 4.30 mAh 6.12 mAh 5.44 mAh 5.32 mAh 6.46 mAh
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When we increased the resolution to WQHD+, the Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra had a full hour shorter battery life than the Galaxy S10+, which has a 10% smaller battery.

FHD+ Resolution @ 120 Hz

Battery
Performance
MatePad Pro Black Shark
2 Pro
Galaxy
Note10+
Galaxy
S10+
S20 Ultra
(FHD 120Hz)
Note20 Ultra
(FHD 120Hz)
Capacity 7,250 mAh 4,000 mAh 4,300 mAh 4,100 mAh 5,000 mAh 4,500 mAh
Battery Life 14 hrs 1 min 12 hrs 25 mins 10 hrs 32 mins 10 hrs 17 mins 9 hrs 4 mins 7 hrs 34 mins
Utilisation
Per Min.
6.90 mAh 4.30 mAh 5.44 mAh 5.32 mAh 7.35 mAh 7.93 mAh
Review Links Review Review Review Review Review
Price Check US
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Malaysia
Singapore
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The Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra used significantly more power than the Galaxy S20 Ultra, with a 120 Hz refresh rate.

Thanks to its 11% larger battery, and lower power consumption, the Galaxy S20 Ultra lasts 1.5 hours longer than the Note 20 Ultra.

 

Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra : Where To Buy?

Malaysia

Here are the direct online purchase links in Malaysia :

Recommended : Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra: Malaysia Launch + Trade-Up Deals!

Singapore

Here are the direct online purchase links in Singapore :

United States

Here are the direct online purchase links in the United States :

United Kingdom

Here are the direct online purchase links in the United Kingdom :

Australia

Here are the direct online purchase links in Australia :

 

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Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : 60Hz vs 120Hz Battery Life!

One of the new features introduced in the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra is its 120Hz display, which allows for smoother scrolling and a more realistic gaming experience.

However, running the display at 120Hz will reduce the Galaxy S20 Ultra’s battery life. Let’s find out exactly how much!

 

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : A Quick Primer!

The Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra is powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 in the United States, and Samsung Exynos 990 in the rest of the world.

To ensure it will last a long time, Samsung gave it a very large 5,000 mAh battery. The corresponding Galaxy S10 Plus from last year only has a 4,100 mAh battery in comparison.

It comes with a 40 MP front camera, and a quad-camera system at the back, with :

  • a 108 MP main camera,
  • a 48 MP telephoto camera with 10X hybrid optical zoom,
  • a 12 MP ultra-wide camera, and
  • a DepthVision camera (for depth sensing)

The top-of-the-line model pairs 16 GB LPDDR5 memory with 512 GB fast UFS 3.0 storage. The other two models come with 12 GB LPDDR5 memory, and either 128 GB or 256 GB storage.

Recommended : Samsung Exynos 990 Performance : How Fast Is It?

 

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : 60Hz vs 120Hz

Running the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra‘s display at 120Hz allows for smoother scrolling and a more realistic gaming experience. However, running the display at 120 Hz saps battery life.

The display not only refreshes twice as often, the GPU has to work twice as hard. This is why Samsung sets the display to 60Hz by default.

 

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : 60Hz vs 120Hz Battery Life!

We ran the PCMark Work 2.0 battery life test until its battery capacity dropped to 20% several times, with the display set to 60Hz and 120Hz. Here were the best results we obtained :

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra @ 60Hz : 11 hours 32 minutes

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra @ 120Hz : 9 hours 4 minutes

So there you have it – increasing the display refresh rate on the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra from 60Hz to 120Hz will reduce its battery life by about 21% or roughly 2.5 hours.

Work 2.0 60Hz Display 120Hz Display Difference
Battery Life 11 hours 32 mins 9 hours 4 mins – 148 mins (21.4%)
Battery Utilisation 5.78 mAh / min. 7.35 mAh / min. + 1.27 mAh / min.

Now we can see why Samsung set the display to 60Hz by default. If battery life is important, keep it at the default refresh rate of 60Hz.

But if you prefer to enjoy the 120Hz display, go on right ahead. Thanks to its large 5,000 mAh battery, the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra will last you quite a few hours!

 

Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra : Price + Availability

Samsung is only offering two colour options – Cosmic Black, and Cosmic Gray – as shown in our video above.

Here are its recommended retail prices :

  • Malaysia : RM 4,999 (128 GB)
  • United States : $1,399.99 (128 GB) | $1,599.99 (512 GB)
  • United Kingdom : £1,199 (128 GB) | £1,399 (512 GB)
  • Australia : A$1,999 (128 GB)

Here are the online purchase options in Malaysia :

 

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How Samsung Found & Fixed Their Exploding Battery Problem

The Samsung Galaxy Note7 arrived to great acclaim on 19 August 2016. It was literally the best phablet ever, with its IP68 rating and its improved S Pen and Knox capabilities. However, its massive early success was soon overshadowed by reports of some Note7 phablets catching fire – the infamous exploding battery problem.

In October, Samsung initiated a global replacement program, but even some of the replacement devices continued to catch fire. That’s when they decided to recall and permanently end the sale of the Galaxy Note7. Since then, they have been working hard on finding out what happened, and how to prevent a recurrence.

After an exhaustive investigation, Samsung can now reveal what caused both the original and the replacement Galaxy Note7 phablets to catch fire, and what they are doing to prevent that from ever happening again. Check it out!

 

The Investigation

After the global replacement program was initiated, Samsung assembled 700 engineers to find out why some of them would spontaneously catch fire. Together with the replacement Note7 phablets from the global recall, their engineers tested more than 200,000 of those returned devices, and over 30,000 batteries.

Samsung also roped in three industrial safety and quality control organisations – UL, Exponent and TÜV Rheinland – to examine the Galaxy Note7 phablets, and provide Samsung with their own findings.

Finally, Samsung went back and examined every aspect of their production processes in their factories in China, Vietnam and south Korea  – from hardware and software development to the assembly and testing of the Galaxy Note7, as well as logistics.

 

Double Trouble

The reason why both the original and the replacement Galaxy Note7 phablets exhibited similar spontaneous combustion issues was because two different batteries were catching fire under different circumstances.

Battery A

The first situation involved battery A which had an overly small casing. The cramped condition led to the negative electrodes being “deflected in the upper right corner of the battery“, and coming into contact with each other.

Battery B

The second situation involved battery B where welding burrs on the positive electrode penetrated the insulation tape and separator, and came into direct contact with the negative electrode. This essentially resulted in a short circuit.

 

Making Sure It Won’t Happen Again

To ensure that Samsung users will never have to worry about the exploding battery problem ever again, Samsung developed a rigorous 8-point battery safety check protocol for all future Samsung devices :

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  • Enhanced battery durability tests – includes overcharging tests, nail puncture tests and extreme temperature stress tests.
  • Visual inspection tests of every battery under standardised guidelines and objective criteria.
  • X-ray scans of every battery to look for any abnormalities.
  • Every battery will undergo a large scale charging and discharging test.
  • TVOC (Total Volatile Organic Compound) Test –  to make sure there isn’t the slightest possibility of leakage
  • Disassembly Test – the batteries are disassembled to assess their quality, including the battery tab welding and insulation tape conditions.
  • Accelerated Usage Test – the batteries will undergo extensive tests to simulate accelerated consumer usage scenarios
  • △OCV (Delta Open Circuit Voltage) Test – Samsung will check for any change in voltage throughout the manufacturing process, from component level to the assembled device.

Samsung may have been hit hard by the exploding battery problem in the Galaxy Note7, but there may be a silver lining after all. It brought up the critical and often overlooked issue of the safety of lithium-ion batteries that are, by nature, volatile. The new battery safety check protocol Samsung put in place should become an industry-standard. Other smartphone manufacturers would do well to adopt Samsung’s battery safety check protocol, or a similar one.

 

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ADATA X7000 Dual USB Power Bank Released

Taipei, 03 January 2017ADATA Technology today launched the ADATA X7000 Power Bank. As the model name suggests, the device is rated for 7000mAh. The X7000 features dual USB ports for efficient battery top-up of two devices at once.

Its stylish design employs the finest components and smart circuitry to provide multiple protective measures, made of highly durable materials to increase fire and impact resistance. A bespoke hairline-brushed aluminum textured surface combined together with a tough plastic side panels resulted in a unique look which differentiate the X7000 from other power banks.

With a choice of three colors, the X7000 is elevated from a mediocre power charging device to a premium power charger on-the-go for smartphones, tablets, and other devices.

ADATA X7000 Power Bank

Functionality into Fashion

While power banks are often thought of as generic, practical items, the ADATA X7000 power bank is a work of art itself. The combination of durable aluminum surface with tough plastic panels dissolves differences in texture into one unmatched visual experience. This innovative power bank is resistant to scratches, chipping and fingerprints smudges.

Weighs merely 210g and measures up to 12mm in thickness, the X7000 could be fitted into narrow, small spaces. The X7000 comes in three distinct colors to better match various smart devices: Titanium grey, blue, and red. A bright white LED status indicator provides at-a-glance charge capacity information, as well as a low-charge caution to keep users informed.

Quick and Efficient Charging

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The X7000 includes two USB ports, providing a total output of 2.4A output as needed by connected devices. The dual ports allow users to charge two mobile devices simultaneously, saving precious time. Additionally, the 7000mAh device can fully recharge a smart phone three times and a tablet one time. Now you can have enough power to watch and shoot videos on the mobile device, take photos and surf social networks, all the long.

Built Durable Inside Out

ADATA makes safety the leading priority with all products, and more so with power banks. Meticulous circuit and wire engineering provides six-faceted protection against excessive heat, voltage, current, charge, and discharge. Externally, the shell uses tough, fire-resistant polycarbonate that has been IEC 60950 impact resistant-certified for safe portability in diverse environments.

 

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The Pokeball Power Bank (1st & 2nd Generation) Review

This is a guest review by Emperor Zensekai.

 

Purchasing The Pokeball Power Banks

There are apparently three “generations” of Pokeball power banks (portable phone chargers) available online. I purchased the first and second generation Pokeball power banks off Amazon, which I will be reviewing here. I did not purchase the third generation “Pikachu Projection Pokeball”, which costs US$15-20 more than the other two models.

The Gen 1 Pokeball power bank was supposed to arrive a day earlier, but it got delayed due to a shipping error. That was just one bump in my epic quest to get one of these Pokeball power banks. I actually had to cancel and get a refund for two other Pokeball power banks I purchased from other e-commerce websites, because I did not receive them even after waiting for 1.5 months!

Word of advice : Don’t bother with the power banks that promise 20,000+ mAh. Chances are you will never get it.

I actually bought both of these Pokeball power banks to hedge my bets. I figured that there was a good chance that either one would never make it, or break soon after I receive them… and I would have to get another refund.

 

The Two Pokeball Power Bank Models

Both the Gen 1 and Gen 2 Pokeball power banks are about the same price, ~US$20.

The Gen 1 Pokeball power bank has four “slits” that light up, with the USB port is in the center. It has a rated battery capacity of 10,000 mAh.

The Gen 2 Pokeball power bank looks more like a Pokeball, with a rim light and two USB ports. It has a rated battery capacity of 12,000 mAh.

From the research I ended up doing to figure all this out, there are real inconsistencies amongst the sellers. I don’t suggest that you buy any that aren’t fulfilled by Amazon themselves!

There seems to be a ⅓ to ¼ failure rate from the reviews I read on these power banks. Some of them may be due to the lack of an instruction manual though, as I will details below.

 

First Impressions

The Gen 1 seller went out of their way to properly secure the Pokeball power bank in the box. They even tossed in a cute Pokeball keychain!

The packaging for the Gen 2 Pokeball power bank was bad though. The box inside the package had come over, and the power bank was halfway out of it.

The Gen 1 Pokeball power bank looked as advertised, but the the rim lighting of the Gen 2 Pokeball power bank was nowhere near as bright as seen in the advertised pictures!

 

Using The Pokeball Power Banks

I prefer the look and feel of the Gen 2 model, but it was very hard to get the USB cable into the socket. It was also heavier than the Gen 1 model, which makes questing for Pokemons with this attached harder… because I have physical issues. However, it is still my favourite of the two.

Getting these power banks is a nightmare, but the part that worries me the most is the lack of instruction manuals in both models. The Gen 1 model has very brief instructions in broken English on the side of the box. The Gen 2 model came with no instructions at all.

Check out the “all your base are belong to us” type of English instructions provided with the Gen 1 Pokeball power bank :

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  • It means full of charge when four lamps are fully berght [sic] and not flashing.
  • Need to keep the battery when not in use for a longtime [sic].

I assume that means you have to keep the battery charged if you are not going to use it for weeks. I also assume that this applies to both Pokeball power banks.

Unfortunately, there is no way to know if either Pokeball power bank can be damaged by overcharging, or if they have an automatic cut-off built-in. Thankfully, the light pattern on the Gen 2 model is very apparent when you recharge it. It’s much harder to tell the charge level of the Gen 1 model.

 

My Verdict

I’m really excited about these Pokeball power banks, and I like them a lot. I just had to do a ton of research to get them.

I think some of the bad reviews on these power banks are due to the lack of an instruction manual on how to use and maintain them. They are not intuitive to the average American who’s used to buying and using products from top-tier companies like Apple and Sony.

You have to be somewhat mindful of these no-brand electronics. I’m relatively certain that if I drop them on a hard floor from six feet or so, they would be damaged. Or if you left one charging for extended periods of time.

Oddly, neither power bank came with any USB cable. You will need to purchase a USB-to-micro USB cable, commonly used by Android smartphones, to recharge it. You can use the same cable to recharge your Android smartphone. You will need a separate Lightning cable for these power banks to recharge your iPhones or iPads.

Overall, I really like these Pokeball power banks. US$20-25 is a fair price for either models. I personally prefer the Gen. 2 model. Finally, I can farm Pokeballs at Pokestops without running low on battery, and do it in proper Pokemon style!

 

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