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National Recovery Plan Phase 1 SOP : 19 July 2021 Edition!

National Recovery Plan Phase 1 SOP : 19 July 2021 Edition!

Here is the latest SOP for Phase 1 of the National Recovery Plan (NRP) for Malaysia!

Please SHARE this out, so your friends are updated on the latest Phase 1 SOP as well!

For Phase 2 SOP, please see National Recovery Phase 2 SOP : 19 July 2021 Edition!

 

National Recovery Plan Phase 1 SOP : 16 July 2021 Video!

This video shows the latest National Recovery Plan SOP slides (16 July 2021) for Phase 1, followed by our English translation.

This Phase 1 SOP currently applies to all states in Malaysia, except Penang, SabahKelantan, Terengganu, Pahang, Perak, and Perlis.

 

NRP Recovery Plan Phase 1 SOP : 19 July 2021 Update!

This is the new National Recovery Plan Phase 1 SOP that was posted on 19 July 2021.

Travel Restrictions

  • Interstate and inter-district travel is FORBIDDEN (based on district borders determined by state governments)
  • All entry and exit into MCO areas will be closed and controlled by the police (PDRM).
  • Only two (2) household representatives may leave to purchase food, medicine, dietary supplement and basic necessities within a radius of 10 kilometres.
  • Up to three (3) people, including the patient, may leave to seek healthcare, medical care, screening test, vaccination, security or emergencies within a radius of 10 kilometres or to the nearest provider.
  • Taxis and e-hailing rides are limited to just TWO (2) people in the vehicle, including the driver, and the passenger must sit in the back.
  • Vehicles carrying goods or involved in the economic chain or industry (except worker transportation) is allowed to travel at full capacity.
  • Official and government vehicles are allowed to travel at full capacity.
  • Airports, ports and logistic sector are ALLOWED to operate 24 hours. Updated!
  • Unloading of non-essential goods in factories is limited to delivery and receipt of goods or cargo in existing stockpiles for the purpose of import and export only with limited workers. Unloading time is only allowed from 8 AM until 8 PM on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
  • Unloading of essential goods is not subject to these restrictions and can proceed as usual.
  • Public transportation (train, bus, LRT, MRT, ERL, monorail, taxi, ferry, e-hailing ride) are allowed to operate at 50% capacity.
  • Travel for funerals and natural disasters are ALLOWED, with police permission.
  • Disaster or humanitarian aid from NGO must obtain permission from the state or district Disaster Management Committee, and the aid must be channelled through the Disaster Operational Control Centre (PKOB) of the affected area.
  • Interstate and inter-district travel for the purpose of going for vaccination is ALLOWED by showing the appointment in MySejahtera, website or SMS.
  • Members of Parliament or State Legislators are ALLOWED to travel interstate or inter-district to visit their constituencies without conducting any events.
  • Interstate and inter-district travel is FORBIDDEN for husbands and wives in long-distance relationships.
  • Travel for Short Term Business Visitors under the One Stop Centre (OSC) initiative for official or business purposes are ALLOWED with police permission.

General Health Protocol

  • Licence holders and premise owners must ensure that customers must maintain physical distance of at least 1 metre entering or leaving their premises.
  • Licence holders and premise owners must provide MySejahtera QR code and a manual logbook to register customers.
  • Hand sanitiser must be provided at the entrance, and customers must use it before entering.
  • The use of MySejahtera is mandatory is areas with good Internet connectivity. The use of logbook is only allowed in areas with no Internet connectivity, or other reasonable excuse.
  • Licence holders and premise owners must ensure that customers and workers check in using MySejahtera. or the manual logbook if there’s no Internet connectivity.
  • Employers, employees, customers and visitors are required to check in using MySejahtera or write their names and phone numbers legibly in the logbook (if there is no Internet connectivity).
  • In shopping malls, customers only need to scan their body temperatures ONCE at the mall entry point. It is not necessary to scan their body temperature at every premise in the mall.
  • Those with body temperatures exceeding 37.5 degrees Celsius are NOT ALLOWED to enter.
  • Malls and premise owners must ensure that only customers with Low Risk or Casual Contact Low Risk in MySejahtera are allowed to enter.
  • Children 12 years or younger are NOT allowed in public places and facilities, EXCEPT in emergencies, treatment, education or exercise.
  • Premise owners and business licence holders must restrict the number of customers within their premises to ensure at least 1 metre physical distancing.
  • Every premise must publicly display the limit of customers allowed inside at any one time. The use of a numbered queue system is encouraged to control the number of customers.
  • All building owners must provide QR Codes for each floor / level.
  • It is MANDATORY for employees, suppliers and customers to properly wear face masks while within the premise.
  • There must be good ventilation and aeration at the premise.
  • It is MANDATORY to wear a face mask, especially in crowded public areas, EXCEPT in these places or situations :
    a) hotel room or paid accommodation, alone or with your own family
    b) Personal working space
    c) Sporting activities and outdoor recreation
    d) Personal vehicle, alone or with your own family
    e) Indoor or outdoor public areas, when there are no other individuals
    f) While eating or drinking in public areas, when there are no other individuals (except in restaurants or other food & beverage premises)

Civil Service

  • Must work from home (WFH) completely, except for frontliners, security, defence and enforcement.
  • Office attendance for essential services in the civil service must not exceed 40% at any one time, and must emphasise work that cannot be performed at home, like payment, maintenance, security, technical management, online meetings and ministerial documentation. Updated!
  • Government counter service will operate physically from 1 July 2021 onwards, involving :
    – services that cannot be conducted online
    – counter service capacity must not exceed 50%
    – people are only allowed to be admitted with scheduled appointments
  • Civil servants going to office must receive official attendance order and worker’s pass.

Private Sector

  • Approved essential services in the private sector must have official approval from 1 June 2021 onwards.
  • Employee travel is limited to approved operations letter or worker’s pass or employer’s letter of authority.
  • Employee capacity for the private sector (essential services only) is limited to 60%, including both operations and management.
  • Accounting services are ALLOWED to operate at 60% capacity. New!

MICE

  • Meetings must be conducted via video conferencing.
  • Seminars, workshops, courses, training and talks are FORBIDDEN, except in-service training through Camp-Based Training.
  • Seminars, workshops, courses, training and talks conducted online are ALLOWED.

Education

  • All public and private institutes of tertiary education, tahfiz centres and other educational institutes must CLOSE.
  • Tertiary education will continue ONLINE.
  • All public and private schools and education institutes, tuition centres, language centres, skill centres, counselling centres, etc. must CLOSE.
  • Only international exams at international and expatriate schools are allowed.
  • All face-to-face learning are FORBIDDEN, except for tertiary education students who require them.
  • International and professional exams, as well as research activities requiring lab access in tertiary education facilities are ALLOWED.
  • Students in boarding schools or universities are ALLOWED to continue using hybrid studies.
  • Private and public kindergartens, kindergartens in private, international and expatriate schools and mind development centres for children 4 to 6 years old are NOT ALLOWED to operate, unless both parents are frontliners or working in essential services.
  • Home care or rehabilitation centres of children, the disabled (OKU), senior citizens, women and other care facilities are ALLOWED to operate, subject to the SOP.

Religion

  • Prayer activities are limited to a maximum of 12 mosque and surau committee members only. All other activities are FORBIDDEN.
  • Islamic wedding ceremony (akad nikah) is ALLOWED only in the Islamic Religious Office / Department with the attendance capacity set by the State Religious Authority.
  • Non-Muslim houses of worship are limited to 12 committee members only, and congregants are NOT ALLOWED.
  • Non-Muslim marriage registrations are allowed at the National Registration Department (JPN), houses of worship and religious associations, subject to limits set by JPN.
  • Burial activities are allowed according to limits set by the State Religion Authority (Islam) or the National Unity Ministry (Non-Muslim).

Business Activities

  • Restaurants, food shops, food stalls, food trucks, hawkers, food courts, hawker centres. food kiosks are ALLOWED to operate from 6 AM until 10 PM for takeaway, drive-through or delivery.
  • Dine-in and park & dine services, and picnics are FORBIDDEN.
  • Grocers and convenience stores are ALLOWED to operate from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  • Hardware stores, vehicle workshops, childcare stores and religious stores are ALLOWED to operate from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  • Healthcare services like hospitals, clinics and medical laboratories are ALLOWED to operate 24 hours, or up to their licensed operating hours.
  • Pharmacies can operate from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  • Petrol stations can operate from 6 AM until 8 PM, except for those on tolled highways which can operate 24 hours.

  • Supermarkets, shopping malls, pharmacies, personal care stores, convenience stores, mini markets and departmental stores can only open sections limited to food, drinks and essential items, from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  • Pharmacies, self care, convenience stores and mini marts are ALLOWED to open from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  • Veterinarian clinics and pet food stores are ALLOWED to open from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  • Laundry services and optical stores are allowed to operate from 8 AM until 8 PM. Self-service laundromats must ensure an employee is present on-premise.
  • Daily and public markets are ALLOWED to open from 6 AM until 4 PM, subject to the local authorities, proper SOP and under RELA / PBT supervision. Updated!
  • Controlled Fresh Produce Market (PST) are ALLOWED to open from 7 AM until 2 PM. Updated!
  • Permanent Farm Market (PTK), MyFarm Outlet (MFO) and Local Farmer’s Association Complex (PPK) are ALLOWED to open from 6 AM until 4 PM.
  • Wholesale markets are ALLOWED to open from 12:01 AM until 6 AM, and from 11 AM until 4 PM, subject to the local authorities, proper SOP and under RELA / PBT supervision.
  • Night markets, farmer’s market, weekly markets and guest markets are FORBIDDEN
  • Fishing for livelihood is ALLOWED.
  • All other activities not mentioned in the SOP are FORBIDDEN.

Sports + Recreation

  • Individual sports and recreational activities without physical contact in open spaces are LIMITED to jogging, cycling, individual games and exercise with physical distancing of 2-3 metres within the neighbourhood, from 7 AM until 8 PM. Updated!
  • Centralised training programs, including closed quarantined competitions using Camp Based Training are ALLOWED.
  • Centralised training programs with quarantine by State Sports Councils using Camp Based Training are ALLOWED.
  • Centralised training programs including quarantined training competitions for teams in the Malaysian Football League (MFL) using Camp Based Training are ALLOWED.
  • Malaysian Football League matches are ALLOWED based on the closed Sports Bubble model, without spectators or supporters.

Creative Industry

  • Development and broadcasting of creative content through recording or live broadcasts include animation, filming, drama, promotions, sitcoms and the like, including dance, art activities theatre, musical arts, cultural and heritage performances as well as the music are FORBIDDEN, except for individual discussions and live-streaming.
  • Recording and live broadcasts of programmes to convey information (other than entertainment) like news, forum, interviews are ALLOWED.

Mining + Quarrying

  • Supply of minerals, rock material and cement only from existing stockpiles as well as transportation from the mine or quarry to the premise or site of major public infrastructure construction or building construction permitted by this SOP.
  • The operation of mines and quarries is ALLOWED with up to 60% worker capacity, subject to the Mining and Quarrying SOP. Updated!

 

NRP Recovery Plan Phase 1 SOP : Essential Services

Essential Services Allowed To Operate In Phase 1 Areas

  1. Food and beverages, including for animals
  2. Healthcare and medical services, including dietary supplements, veterinarian services, etc.
  3. Water supply
  4. Energy supply
  5. Security and safety, defence, emergency, social and humanitarian services
  6. Waste disposal and public sanitisation and sewerage
  7. Land, water and air transportation
  8. Port, shipyard, airport services and operations, including loading, unloading, cargo handling and piloting, storage or transportation of commodities
  9. Communications including media, telecommunications and Internet, post and courier, as well as broadcasting (for the purpose of conveying information, news and the like.
  10. Banking, insurance, takaful and capital markets (60% capacity)
  11. Community credit and pawn shops
  12. E-commerce and information technology
  13. Production, distillation, storage, supply and distribution of fuels and lubricants
  14. Hotels and accommodation (only for quarantine purposes, segregation, employment for essential services and not for tourism).
  15. Critical construction, maintenance and repair
  16. Forestry services (limited to enforcement) and wildlife
  17. Legislative and judiciary.
  18. Lawyers and commissioners of oaths
  19. Logistics limited to delivery of essential services
  20. Accounting services New!

Essential Services According To Sector

All industries are FORBIDDEN, except for the following sectors :

Manufacturing (60% employee capacity)

  1. Aerospace (components and maintenance, repair and overhaul – MRO)
  2. Food and beverage
  3. Packaging and printing materials, only related to food and health
  4. Personal care and cleaning products
  5. Healthcare and medical medicine
  6. Personal care items, personal protective equipment (PPE), including rubber gloves and fire safety equipment
  7. Components for medical devices.
  8. Electrical and electronics of global economic chain importance
  9. Oil and gas, including petrochemicals and petrochemical products
  10. Machinery and equipment for health and food products
  11. Textiles for PPE production only
  12. Production, distillation, storage, supply and distribution of fuels and lubricants

Agriculture, Fisheries, Livestock, Plantation and Commodities (“optimal” employee capacity)

  1. Agriculture, fisheries and livestock and their supply chains – for example, shops selling fertilisers and pesticides, or oil palm fruit processing factories are allowed to operate
  2. Oil palm, rubber, pepper and cocoa plantation and commodities including their supply chains

Construction

  1. Critical maintenance and repair works
  2. Major public infrastructure and construction works
  3. Building construction works that provide complete employee accommodation at construction sites, or workers that are housed in Centralised Workers Quarters (CLQ).
  4. Construction works carried out by G1, G2, G3 and G4 contractors.

Trade + Distribution

  1. Shopping malls must be CLOSED, except for supermarkets, hypermarkets and departmental stores INCLUDING all listed essential services.
  2. Supermarkets and hypermarkets
  3. Departmental store, EXCEPT clothes, decorations, cosmetics and children toys
  4. Pharmacies, self-care stores, convenience stores and mini marts.
  5. Restaurants
  6. Laundry services, including self-service laundromats
  7. Pet care and pet food stores
  8. Eyewear and optical goods stores
  9. Hardware stores
  10. E-commerce – all product categories
  11. Wholesale and distribution – for all essential products only
  12. Vehicle workshops, maintenance and spare parts
  13. Other specialty retail store (petrol stations)
  14. Bookstores and stationery shops
  15. Computer shops and telecommunications

 

National Recovery Plan Phase 1 SOP : NEGATIVE LIST

These activities are FORBIDDEN using the National Recovery Plan Phase 1 SOP.

  • Spa, reflexology, massage, wellness, beauty, barber and hair saloons, pedicure and manicure
  • Cybercafes and cybercenters
  • Driving schools, maritime training centres, flight schools
  • Photography activities
  • Gambling, horse racing and casinos
  • Factory manufacturing alcoholic beverages, and shops selling alcoholic beverages
  • Night clubs or pubs
  • Cinemas
  • Official and unofficial public and private events
  • Feasts, festivals, weddings, engagements, receptions, aqiqah ceremonies, tahlil, anniversaries, birthdays, reunions, retreats and other social events.
  • Receiving guests or visitors at home, except in emergencies or for delivery services.
  • Seminars, workshops, courses, training, conferences, exhibitions, lectures and all MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conventions and Exhibitions) events that are face-to-face.
  • Tourist attractions like zoos, farms, aquariums, edutainment centres, extreme parks, adventure parks, nature parks, etc.

  • Souvenir and craft shops, culture and historical premises like museums, libraries, art galleries, native art and culture, stage performance, etc.
  • Theme parks, family entertainment centres, indoor playgrounds, karaoke, etc.
  • Interdistrict and interstate tourism
  • Overseas travel by citizens, and local travel involving foreigners entering Malaysia.
  • All sports and recreation activities EXCEPT those listed in this SOP.
  • All sports and recreation premises and facilities, except public parks which are subject to the local authorities.
  • Sports and recreation that involve groups or physical contact.
  • International or local championships, competitions, and matches, EXCEPT those organised by the National Sports Council and training matches for teams under the Malaysian Football League (MFL).
  • Sports or recreational activities that cross district and state lines, EXCEPT with police permission.
  • Hotel lounge performances
  • Indoor or outdoor busking (except in PPV – vaccination centres)
  • Any activity that involves many people gathering in one place until it is hard to maintain physical distancing, and compliance with the Director General of Health’s orders.
  • Any other matter that may be decided by the Government from time to time.

 

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Name : Adrian Wong

Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Thank you in advanced! 

 

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More Sectors Allowed To Open In Selangor EMCO Areas!

The Malaysian government has allowed more sectors to open in Selangor EMCO areas!

Find out what businesses and factories are allowed to reopen in EMCO areas in Selangor!

 

More Sectors Allowed To Open In Selangor EMCO Areas!

On 7 July 2021, the Malaysia Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) announced that a cabinet meeting chaired by the Prime Minister agreed to allow more sectors to open in Selangor EMCO areas!

  • Electrical and electronics (E&E) and its supply chains
  • Aerospace (Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO))
  • Machinery and equipment (M&E) for the production of healthcare and food products
  • Selected food and beverage manufacturing
    – Mineral water, chocolate malt, coffee, tea, fresh milk
    – Sugar, cooking oil, flour, rice, break, milk products, grains, milk powder, biscuits, sardine, instant noodles, condensed milk, evaporated milk, salt, vermicelli, noodles, sauces, soy sauce, spices, baby food, frozen food (chicken, beef, mutton, seafood, vegetables) and animal food.

 

Full List Of Allowed Sectors In Selangor EMCO Areas

A. Manufacturing Sector

  • Dry Food : sugar, cooking oil, flour, rice, break, milk products, grains, milk powder, biscuits, sardine, instant noodles, condensed milk, evaporated milk, salt, vermicelli, noodles, sauces, soy sauce, spices, baby food, animal food
  • Frozen Food : chicken, beef, mutton, seafood, vegetables
  • Drinks : mineral water, chocolate malt, coffee, tea, fresh milk
  • Self-care : baby diapers, adult diapers, medicines, hand sanitiser, face mask
  • Aerospace : Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO)
  • Machinery and equipment (M&E) : only for the production of healthcare and food products
  • Electrical and electronics (E&E) : including its supply chains

* Only involves packaging, labelling and transportation

B. Service Sector

  • Water, electricity and energy
  • Healthcare
  • Banking
  • Veterinary and animal feed
  • Security (security and safety), defence, emergency, welfare and humanitarian aid
  • Land, water and air transportation
  • Shipyard and airport port services and operations, including unloading and cargo handling, lighter transport, piloting and storage or stockpiling of commodities
  • Hotels and lodging (only for the purpose of quarantine, segregation, essential service work and not for tourism)
  • Communications include media, telecommunications and the internet, post and courier as well as broadcasting (for the purpose of conveying news, information and the like)
  • Cleaning, solid waste management and sewerage
  • Information technology and E-commerce (for messaging and deliveries only).
  • Delivery of food, beverage and parcel, including p-hailing (parcel hailing)

* Any activity that is part of chain in this service sector list.

Recommended : KL + Selangor EMCO 3.0 SOP : 7 July 2021 Edition!

 

Please Support My Work!

If you would like to support my work, you can do so via bank transfer /  PayPal / credit card.

Name : Adrian Wong

Bank Transfer : CIMB 7064555917 (Swift Code : CIBBMYKL)
Credit Card / Paypal : https://paypal.me/techarp

Thank you in advanced! 

 

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MCO 3.0 Total Lockdown SOP : 3 June 2021 Update!

Here is the 3 June 2021 update of the MCO 3.0 total lockdown SOP of Malaysia, which many are calling FMCO (Full MCO)!

We will keep updating this guide, as and when they issue new SOPs!

Updated @ 2021-06-03 : Added the 2 June 2021 MCO 3.0 SOP video and list.
Updated @ 2021-05-31 : Added the full lockdown SOP list of PERMITTED and FORBIDDEN activities.
Originally posted @ 2021-05-30

 

MCO 3.0 Total Lockdown : Phase 1 SOP Starts 1 June 2021!

On 29 May 2021, the Malaysia Prime Minister’s Department announced that the National Security Council (MKN) decided to order Total Lockdown Phase 1.

From 1 June until 14 June 2021, there will be a complete lockdown of the social and economic sectors across the country.

This new lockdown SOP will apply ACROSS Malaysia – no states are exempted.

Recommended : Malaysia To Undergo TOTAL LOCKDOWN Phase 1!

 

MCO 3.0 Total Lockdown SOP : 2 June 2021 Edition!

Here is a video showing the 2 June 2021 edition of the total lockdown SOP for MCO 3.0, which people are calling Full MCO or FMCO.

 

MCO 3.0 Total Lockdown SOP : Essential Services

All social and economic activities are FORBIDDEN, except for these 17 essential services :

  1. Food and beverages, including for animals
  2. Healthcare and medical services, including dietary supplements, veterinarian services, etc.
  3. Water supply
  4. Energy supply
  5. Security and safety, defence, emergency, social and humanitarian services
  6. Waste disposal and public sanitisation and sewerage
  7. Land, water and air transportation
  8. Port, shipyard, airport services and operations, including loading, unloading, cargo handling and piloting, storage or transportation of commodities
  9. Communications including media, telecommunications and Internet, post and courier, as well as broadcasting (for the purpose of conveying information, news and the like.
  10. Banking, insurance, takaful and capital markets
  11. Community credit services (mortgage and Ar-rahnu)
  12. E-commerce and information technology
  13. Production, distillation, storage, supply and distribution of fuels and lubricants
  14. Hotels and accommodation (only for quarantine purposes, segregation, employment for essential services and not for tourism).
  15. Critical construction, maintenance and repair
  16. Forestry services (limited to enforcement) and wildlife
  17. Logistics limited to delivery of essential services

 

MCO 3.0 Total Lockdown SOP : Essential Industries

All industries are FORBIDDEN, except for the following sectors :

Manufacturing (60% employee capacity)

  1. Aerospace (components and maintenance, repair and overhaul – MRO)
  2. Food and beverage
  3. Packaging and printing materials, only related to food and health
  4. Personal care and cleaning products
  5. Healthcare and medical products, including dietary supplements
  6. Personal care items, personal protective equipment (PPE), including rubber gloves and fire safety equipment
  7. Components for medical devices.
  8. Electrical and electronics of global economic chain importance
  9. Oil and gas, including petrochemicals and petrochemical products
  10. Chemical products
  11. Machinery and equipment for health and food products
  12. Textiles for PPE production only
  13. Production, distillation, storage, supply and distribution of fuels and lubricants

Agriculture, Fisheries, Livestock, Plantation and Commodities (“optimal” employee capacity)

  1. Agriculture, fisheries and livestock and their supply chains – for example, shops selling fertilisers and pesticides, or oil palm fruit processing factories are allowed to operate
  2. Oil palm, rubber, pepper and cocoa plantation and commodities including their supply chains

Construction (“optimal” employee capacity)

  1. Critical maintenance and repair works
  2. Major public infrastructure and construction works
  3. Building construction works that provide complete employee accommodation at construction sites, or workers that are housed in Centralised Workers Quarters (CLQ).

Trade + Distribution (8 AM until 8 PM daily)

  1. Shopping malls must be CLOSED, except for supermarkets, hypermarkets, departmental stores and premises selling food and beverages, essential items, pharmacy, personal care, convenience store, mini mart, and restaurants for takeaway and home delivery.
  2. Supermarkets, hypermarkets, pharmacies, personal care stores, convenience stores, mini marts and grocery stores, as well as departmental stores are allowed to open, but RESTRICTED to their food, beverage and essential item sections only.
  3. Restaurants, stalls and food outlets – only for takeaways, drive-through or food delivery
  4. Laundry services, including self-service laundromats
  5. Pet care and pet food stores
  6. Eyewear and optical goods stores
  7. Hardware stores
  8. Vehicle workshops, maintenance and spare parts
  9. E-commerce – all product categories
  10. Wholesale and distribution – for all essential products only

 

MCO 3.0 Total Lockdown SOP : The Full List

Note : Any activity NOT mentioned in this SOP is FORBIDDEN.

Travel Restrictions

  1. Interstate or inter-district travel is FORBIDDEN.
  2. Up to two (2) people from each household are allowed to go out to purchase food, medicine, dietary supplements and other daily essentials.
  3. Up to three (3) people, including the patient, are allowed to go out from each household to seek medical treatment, healthcare, screening test, security assistance or other emergencies within a radius of no more than 10 kilometres from their home, or the nearest available service (if there are none within 10 km).
  4. Up to two (2) people are allowed in each taxi or e-hailing ride, including the driver. The passenger must be seated in the rear compartment.
  5. Commercial vehicles carrying essential goods are allowed to carry people up to the licensed limit.
  6. Official government vehicles are allowed to carry up to their maximum capacity.
  7. All airports and ports are allowed to operate as usual.
  8. Sea and land public transportation services, like employee transportation, public buses, express buses, LRT, MRT, ERL, monorail and ferry are allowed to operate at 50% of vehicle capacity.
  9. Travel for funerals and natural disasters are allowed with police permission.
  10. NGOs travelling to assist with natural or humanitarian disasters must obtain permission from the State / District Disaster Management Committee, and the aid must be funnelled through the Disaster Operations Control Centre (PKOB).
  11. Interstate / inter-district travel for the purpose of COVID-19 vaccination is ALLOWED with the display of vaccine appointment on MySejahtera, website or SMS.
  12. Members of Parliament or State Assembly are ALLOWED to cross state or district lines.
  13. Interstate travel is FORBIDDEN for couples in long-distance relationships.
  14. Short-term business visitors are ALLOWED for official or business purposes under the One Stop Centre (OSC) Initiative, with police permission

General Health Protocols

  1. Premise owners and business licence holders must ensure that customers enter and leave the premises with a minimum physical distance of 1 metre.
  2. Premise owners and business licence holders are OBLIGATED to provide the MySejahtera QR Code and a logbook to register visits by their customers.
  3. Hand sanitisers must be provided at entry points, and customers must use them before entering the premise.
  4. The use of MySejahtera is MANDATORY in areas with good Internet connectivity. The use of a logbook is only allowed in areas with no Internet connectivity or reasonable excuses (senior citizens, no smartphone, etc.)
  5. Premise owners and business licence holders must ensure that customers check in using MySejahtera, or writing their name and telephone number manually if there is no Internet connectivity.
  6. In shopping malls, customers only need to scan their body temperatures ONCE at the mall entry point. It is not necessary to scan their body temperature at every premise in the mall.
  7. Those with body temperatures exceeding 37.5 degrees Celsius are NOT ALLOWED to enter.
  8. Malls and premise owners must ensure that only customers with Low Risk or Casual Contact Low Risk in MySejahtera are allowed to enter.
  9. Children 12 years or younger are NOT allowed in public places and facilities, EXCEPT in emergencies, treatment, education or exercise.
  10. Premise owners and business licence holders must restrict the number of customers within their premises to ensure at least 1 metre physical distancing.
  11. Every premise must publicly display the limit of customers allowed inside at any one time. The use of a numbered queue system is encouraged to control the number of customers.
  12. All building owners must provide QR Codes for each floor / level.
  13. It is MANDATORY for employees, suppliers and customers to properly wear face masks while within the premise.
  14. There must be good ventilation and aeration at the premise.
  15. It is MANDATORY to wear a face mask, especially in crowded public areas, EXCEPT in these places or situations :
    a) hotel room or paid accommodation, alone or with your own family
    b) Personal working space
    c) Sporting activities and outdoor recreation
    d) Personal vehicle, alone or with your own family
    e) Indoor or outdoor public areas, when there are no other individuals
    f) While eating or drinking in public areas, when there are no other individuals (except in restaurants or other food & beverage premises)

Civil + Private Employees 

  1. Civil servants must work from home (WFH) completely, except for frontliners, security, defence and enforcement.
  2. Office attendance for essential services in the civil service must not exceed 20% at any one time, and must emphasise work that cannot be performed at home, like payment, maintenance, security, technical management, online meetings and ministerial documentation.
  3. Civil servants going to office must receive official attendance order and worker’s pass.
  4. Employee capacity for the private sector (essential services only) is limited to 60%, including both operations and management.
  5. Approved essential services must have official approval from 1 June 2021 onwards. Employee travel is limited to approved operations letter or worker’s pass or employer’s letter of authority.
  6. Meetings must be conducted via video conferencing.
  7. Seminars, workshops, courses, training and talks are FORBIDDEN, except through online methods or in-service training through Camp-Based Training.

Allowed Business + Services

  1. Restaurants, food shops, food stalls, food trucks, hawkers, food courts, hawker centres. food kiosks are ALLOWED to operate from 8 AM until 8 PM for takeaway, drive-through or delivery.
  2. Dine-in and park & dine services, and picnics are FORBIDDEN.
  3. Grocers and convenience stores are ALLOWED to operate from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  4. Hardware stores, vehicle workshops, childcare stores and religious stores are ALLOWED to operate from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  5. Healthcare services like hospitals, clinics and medical laboratories are ALLOWED to operate 24 hours, or up to their licensed operating hours.
  6. Pharmacies can operate from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  7. Petrol stations can operate from 6 AM until 8 PM, except for those on tolled highways which can operate 24 hours.
  8. Supermarkets, shopping malls, pharmacies, personal care stores, convenience stores, mini markets and departmental stores can only open sections limited to food, drinks and essential items, from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  9. Veterinarian clinics and pet food stores are ALLOWED to open from 8 AM until 8 PM.
  10. Laundry services and optical stores are allowed to operate from 8 AM until 8 PM. Self-service laundromats must ensure an employee is present on-premise.
  11. Daily and public markets are ALLOWED to open from 6 AM until 2 PM, subject to the local authorities, proper SOP and under RELA / PBT supervision.
  12. Controlled Fresh Produce Market (PST) are ALLOWED to open from 7 AM until 12 noon.
  13. Permanent Farm Market (PTK), MyFarm Outlet (MFO) and Local Farmer’s Association Complex (PPK) are ALLOWED to open from 6 AM until 4 PM.
  14. Wholesale markets are ALLOWED to open from 12:01 AM until 6 AM, and from 11 AM until 4 PM, subject to the local authorities, proper SOP and under RELA / PBT supervision.
  15. Night markets, farmer’s market, weekly markets and guest markets are FORBIDDEN
  16. Fishing for livelihood is ALLOWED.

Education

  1. All public and private institutes of tertiary education, tahfiz centres and other educational institutes must CLOSE.
  2. Tertiary education will continue ONLINE.
  3. All public and private schools and education institutes, tuition centres, language centres, skill centres, counselling centres, etc. must CLOSE.
  4. Only international exams at international and expatriate schools are allowed.
  5. All face-to-face learning are FORBIDDEN, except for tertiary education students who require them.
  6. International and professional exams, as well as research activities requiring lab access in tertiary education facilities are ALLOWED.
  7. Students in boarding schools or universities are ALLOWED to continue using hybrid studies.
  8. Private and public kindergartens, kindergartens in private, international and expatriate schools and mind development centres for children 4 to 6 years old are NOT ALLOWED to operate, except for parents who are frontliners or both working.
  9. Home care or rehabilitation centres of children, the disabled (OKU), senior citizens, women and other care facilities are allowed to operate, subject to the SOP.

Religion

  1. Prayer activities are limited to a maximum of 12 mosque and surau committee members only. All other activities are FORBIDDEN.
  2. Islamic wedding ceremony (akad nikah) is ALLOWED only in the Islamic Religious Office / Department with the attendance capacity set by the State Religious Authority.
  3. Burial activities are allowed according to limits set by the State Religion Authority (Islam) or the National Unity Ministry (Non-Muslim).
  4. Non-Muslim houses of worship are limited to 12 committee members only, and congregants are NOT ALLOWED.
  5. Non-Muslim marriage registrations are allowed at the National Registration Department (JPN), houses of worship and religious associations, subject to limits set by JPN.

Sports + Recreation

  1. Individual sports and recreational activities without physical contact in open spaces are LIMITED to jogging and exercise with physical distancing of 2-3 metres within the neighbourhood, from 7 AM until 8 PM.
  2. Centralised training programs, including closed quarantined competitions using Camp Based Training are ALLOWED.
  3. Centralised training programs with quarantine by State Sports Councils using Camp Based Training are ALLOWED.
  4. Centralised training programs including quarantined training competitions for teams in the Malaysian Football League (MFL) using Camp Based Training are ALLOWED.

Creative Industry

  1. Development and broadcasting of creative content through recording or live broadcasts include animation, filming, drama, promotions, sitcoms and the like, including dance, art activities theatre, musical arts, cultural and heritage performances as well as the music are FORBIDDEN, except for individual discussions and live-streaming.

 

MCO 3.0 Total Lockdown SOP : NEGATIVE LIST

These activities are FORBIDDEN.

  1. Spa, reflexology, massage, wellness, beauty, barber and hair saloons, pedicure and manicure
  2. Cybercafes and cybercenters
  3. Driving schools, maritime training centres, flight schools
  4. Photography activities
  5. Gambling, horse racing and casinos
  6. Factory manufacturing alcoholic beverages, and shops selling alcoholic beverages
  7. Night clubs or pubs
  8. Cinemas
  9. Official and unofficial public and private events
  10. Feasts, festivals, weddings, engagements, receptions, aqiqah ceremonies, tahlil, anniversaries, birthdays, reunions, retreats and other social events.
  11. Receiving guests or visitors at home, except in emergencies or for delivery services.
  12. Seminars, workshops, courses, training, conferences, exhibitions, lectures and all MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conventions and Exhibitions) events that are face-to-face.
  13. Tourist attractions like zoos, farms, aquariums, edutainment centres, extreme parks, adventure parks, nature parks, etc.
  14. Souvenir and craft shops, culture and historical premises like museums, libraries, art galleries, native art and culture, stage performance, etc.
  15. Theme parks, family entertainment centres, indoor playgrounds, karaoke, etc.
  16. Interdistrict and interstate tourism – Overseas travel by citizens, and local travel involving foreigners.
  17. All sports and recreation activities EXCEPT those listed in this SOP.
  18. All sports and recreation premises and facilities, except public pars which are subject to the local authorities. – Sports and recreation that involve groups or physical contact.
  19. International or local championships, competitions, and matches, EXCEPT those organised by the National Sports Council and training matches for teams under the Malaysian Football League (MFL).
  20. Sports or recreational activities that cross district and state lines, EXCEPT with police permission.
  21. Hotel lounge performances
  22. Indoor or outdoor busking
  23. Any activity that involves many people gathering in one place until it is hard to maintain physical distancing, and compliance with the Director General of Health’s orders.
  24. Any other matter that may be decided by the Government from time to time.

 

Help Support My Work!

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Can Donald Trump Really Blame Iran For Rocket Attack?

Donald Trump just accused Iran of the rocket attack on the US embassy in Baghdad, threatening retaliation!

Take a look at the picture of three rockets he posted, and find out what the facts really are!

 

Donald Trump : Iran Responsible For Rocket Attack On US Embassy

Even in the waning days of his Presidency, Donald Trump isn’t quite done with Iran.

In a new threat against the Islamic Republic of Iran, Trump posted a picture of three unfired rockets, which he claimed were from Iran.

Our embassy in Baghdad got hit Sunday by several rockets. Three rockets failed to launch. Guess where they were from: IRAN. Now we hear chatter of additional attacks against Americans in Iraq…Some friendly health advice to Iran: If one American is killed, I will hold Iran responsible. Think it over.

As Trump isn’t a very popular president outside of his fanatical base (no kidding), there is much skepticism about his post.

Some have pointed out that the rockets have English markings and could be American-made. Others wonder if these are even rockets – they look more like large versions of a rifle cartridge than rockets.

 

Rocket Attack On US Embassy : A Quick Primer

Before we look into the veracity of Trump’s claims, here’s a quick primer on the rocket attack on the US embassy in Baghdad, Iraq.

At around 8:30 PM on Sunday, 20 December 2020, approximately 21 rockets were fired on the US embassy in Baghdad.

Only about half of the rockets hit the embassy compound, while the others missed and hit an Iraqi apartment complex and vehicles near the embassy.

Photo Credit : Reuters/Landov

In the end, two buildings and a gym in the embassy, vehicles outside the embassy and a generator at the apartment complex, were damaged.

There was only one injury – an Iraqi soldier – no one else died or were injured by the attack.

 

Is Iran Responsible For Rocket Attack On US Embassy?

Unfortunately, the answer isn’t quite so simple as yes or no, Iran did or did not fire those rockets at the US embassy in Baghdad.

Let’s take a look at the facts…

Fact #1 : Those Are 107 mm Haseb Rockets

The Haseb is an Iranian copy of the Chinese Type 63-2 – a spin-stabilised 107 mm rocket with a high-explosive (HE) warhead.

The entire rocket weighs about 18 kg, with an 8 kg cast TNT warhead and a Chinese MJ-1 (Jiàn-1) impact and graze fuse.

Fact #2 : Iran Manufactures + Uses 107mm Haseb Rockets

Haseb rockets are manufactured by Iran’s Armaments Industries Group (AIG), and used by Iranian forces as a short-ranged barrage weapon.

In this picture, IRGC commandos are seen loading a Type 63 rocket launcher mounted onto a pickup truck.

Fact #3 : The English Markings Are Genuine

Some sharp-eyed netizens noticed that rockets have English words on them, instead of Farsi or Arabic words :

107mm ROCKET
LOT : 573
DATE : 2016
N.W : 18kg
R.No. : 2103

This has led to suggestions that the rockets may be fake, or made by Americans themselves, or replicas of the real rockets used in a false flag operation.

Here you can see the actual rockets (on the left) and inert replicas of the Haseb rockets. No doubt they look very similar.

However, there is really no need for the US military to purchase replicas even for a false flag operation. Many Haseb rockets have been captured over the years.

The English markings do not mean they are American-made. The Haseb rocket is also made for export by Iran’s Armaments Industries Group (AIG), and so uses English markings.

The inert replica above has English markings, because the real Haseb rockets have English markings.

Fact #4 : Haseb Rockets Have A Very Short Range

Haseb rockets have a very short range – up to 9 kilometres, and are not very accurate.

That means they would have to be fired very close to the Baghdad Green Zone in order to have a reasonable chance of hitting the US embassy inside.

Any suggestion that Iranian forces fired them inside Baghdad itself would be ludicrous. Even if Iran wanted to strike at the Americans, they would use an allied militant group to make attribution difficult.

Fact #5 : Attribution Is Difficult

The Haseb rockets are not exclusively used by Iranian forces. They are exported to Iranian auxiliary forces and allied militant groups like the Hezbollah.

So it would not be possible for the United States to directly attribute the rocket attack to Iran, unless they capture the people who actually fired the rockets.

It could also be a rogue militant group, or even a false flag action by a rival nation-state. After all, numerous examples of the Haseb rocket have been captured by other militant groups and even countries like Israel.

In fact, Gen. Frank McKenzie, who leads the US Central Command and once warned that American forces imminent threat from Iran specifically told The Wall Street Journal,

I do not know the degree to which Iran is complicit. We do not seek a war, and I don’t actually believe they seek one either.

Even Iran-backed Kataib Hezbollah described the rocket attack on the US embassy as “undisciplined“.

Fact #6 : We Don’t Know Who Owned Those Rockets

The three Haseb rockets that Donald Trump posted were obviously not fired.

But whether they “failed to launch” as Trump claimed, or were simply captured unfired, is unknown. Trump likely can’t tell the difference.

Unless the rocketeers were captured together with these three rockets, it would be impossible to also attribute the rocket attack to any particular group, never mind Iran.

Even so, the mere possession of these rockets does not mean that they actually launched that particular attack.

 

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How Did Iran Shoot Down UIA Flight PS752 By Mistake?

It seems incredulous that Iran could shoot down UIA Flight PS752 by mistake, but the sad fact is that no military can always correctly identify bogies.

We examine how Iran mistook UIA Flight PS752 for a US cruise missile, and shot it down with a Tor M1 missile, killing all 176 people onboard.

 

The Circumstances Surrounding UIA Flight PS752

On 3 January 2020, US President Donald Trump escalated tensions with Iran by ordering the assassination of Iranian Major General Qasem Soleimani.

Soleimani’s assassination by Hellfire missile could be construed as an act of war against Iran, and naturally compelled a military response. That came in the form of 22 ballistic missiles fired on two US bases in Iraq.

Recommended : Is Donald Trump RESPONSIBLE For UIA Flight 752 Deaths?

The Iranians expected a US cruise missile attack in retaliation, and appeared to have prepared for such an eventuality with the deployment of short range missile defence systems around Tehran.

Five hours after they fired those ballistic missiles, UIA Flight PS752 took off from the Imam Khomeini International Airport.

Unfortunately, a SAM operator mistook it for a US cruise missile, and shot it down with a Tor M1 missile.

So how could Iran’s veteran military forces have made such a colossal mistake?

 

Tor M1 / SA-15 Gauntlet

First, let’s consider the SAM platform that shot down UIA Flight PS752 – the Russian Tor M1, also known by its NATO designation SA-15 Gauntlet.

The Tor (Russian for Torus) missile system is an armoured tracked vehicle with a pulse-doppler radar, and eight 9K331 Tor M1 missiles.

Introduced in 1991, this mobile SAM system is designed to accompany and protect troops in a battlefield against hostile aircraft and cruise missiles.

It is not usually parked in defence of fixed installations, and have greater autonomy than centralised air defence systems. It is likely that the Iranians brought in these mobile SAM systems as the last line of defence in an impending conflict.

 

War-Like Situation Before PS752 Flight

Next, we have to consider the war footing that the Iranian military, and specifically, the IRGC (Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps) found itself in, after launching ballistic missiles at US bases.

Besides, the United States did earlier just assassinate one of their top military leaders – an action that could be considered an act of war.

Even if the Iranian government does not want a war with the United States, the Iranian military and the IRGC would have been compelled to prepare for the worst.

It is with that mindset in mind, that we consider how Iran could have mistaken UIA Flight PS752 for a cruise missile, shooting it down.

 

How Did Iran Shoot Down UIA Flight PS752 By Mistake?

Poor Training?

As one of Iran’s older SAM systems and a short range system at that, the Tor M1 is likely to be assigned to less elite units. So it is plausible that inexperience or poor training led to the tragedy.

No Central Command?

Multiple Tor vehicles can be linked to a Ranzhir-M mobile command center, for increased detection range and centralised command.

It is possible that the Tor vehicles were dispersed for localised defence, and not linked to a central command system. That would leave the decision to fire in the hands of a junior officer, possibly even a conscript!

Short Reaction Time?

The Tor M1 missile also has a narrow engagement range of 1.5 km to 12 km. It cannot be used against anything closer than 1.5 km, or further than 12 km.

When Flight PS752 popped up just a few kilometres from this Tor M1 vehicle, it would give the missile operator just a matter of seconds to identify it and decide whether to fire or not.

Heightened Expectations Of A Strike?

The expectation of a retaliatory strike would, no doubt, weigh heavily on the mind of the missile operator. After all, they just fired 22 ballistic missiles on two US bases.

In normal circumstances, the Tor missile system would not be “weapons hot”. But they were expecting a salvo of cruise missiles, so the missile operator would have been light on the trigger.

Failure To Whitelist Flight PS752?

When Flight PS752 popped up on the Tor missile system’s radar, the operator would have to decide if it was a hostile aircraft or a legitimate civilian aircraft.

Unfortunately, its pulse-doppler radar would not be able identify the type of the aircraft, only its speed and direction. But Flight PS752 and a Tomahawk cruise missile would have roughly similar subsonic speeds.

An example of a pulse doppler radar’s display

That’s why civilian airliners use transponders and the IFF system to ensure that everyone knows that they are not a threat. Flight PS752 would definitely have been squawking its transponder code.

Normally, SAM crews would receive the flight plans and transponder codes for airliners scheduled to fly in and out of the area, so they can be eliminated as threats.

It is plausible that this Tor missile operator did not, or could not, clear Flight PS752’s transponder code, and assumed it was a cruise missile attempting to masquerade as an airliner.

Failure To Establish No-Fly Zone

One thing is for sure though – the Iranians should have established a no-fly zone around Tehran, after firing their ballistic missiles. It was a serious and fatal mistake.

The danger of jittery, trigger-happy Air Defence crews in charge of weapons hot SAM systems cannot be understated.

It would also have made it easier to identify hostile aircraft in Iranian airspace. Yet they continued to let civilian aircraft fly in and out of Tehran.

 

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Porsche Tri-Wing S-91x Pegasus Starfighter Revealed!

Porsche and Lucasfilm just unveiled the Tri-Wing S-91x Pegasus Starfighter that will be showcased in the premiere of Star Wars : The Rise of Skywalker in Los Angeles!

Take a look at the Porsche Tri-Wing S-91x Pegasus Starfighter, and how Porsche and Lucasfilm came to create it!

 

Porsche Tri-Wing S-91x Pegasus Starfighter : A Design Partnership

The Porsche Tri-Wing S-91x Pegasus Starfighter is a design DNA blend of Porsche and Lucasfilm.

Over a period of two months, the Porsche Tri-Wing S-91x Pegasus Starfighter project team worked at their respective design studios in Weissach and San Francisco to create initial ideas and drafts, before finally coming up with a concrete concept.

The final design, named Tri-Wing S-91x Pegasus Starfighter, will be presented as a detailed model measuring 1.5 metres (5 feet) in length at the film premiere of Star Wars : The Rise of Skywalker in Los Angeles.

“The design of the spaceship is harmoniously integrated into the Star Wars film world while at the same time demonstrating clear analogies with the characteristic Porsche styling and proportions,” says Michael Mauer, Vice President Style Porsche at Porsche AG.

“The basic shape of the cabin, which tapers towards the rear, and a highly distinctive topography from the cockpit flyline to the turbines establish visual parallels with the iconic design of the 911 and the Taycan. The very compact layout conveys dynamism and agility, lending emphasis to the Porsche design features mentioned.”

“This collaboration is an amazing opportunity to merge the design aesthetics of Porsche and Star Wars. I found it to be creatively challenging and extremely inspiring,” says Doug Chiang, Vice President and Executive Creative Director for Lucasfilm. “It is thrilling to infuse Star Wars with Porsche styling to create an iconic new spaceship that could exist both on Earth or in the cinematic universe.”

While legal requirements impose certain restrictions on creativity in the classic design process for a series-production vehicle, this project opens up a whole new dimension of freedom.

At the same time, the Style Porsche team faced fresh challenges, since creating a purely virtual design is demanding, too. On the screen, the starship is only seen in two dimensions, while classic series-production vehicles appear physically in three dimensions.

In addition, starships usually only appear dynamically in the film and are only visible for a brief moment – so the design has to create an impression and be recognisable within a matter of seconds.

 

Porsche Tri-Wing S-91x Pegasus Starfighter : The Final Design

A glance at the details reveals a number of features familiar from the Porsche design style.

The front is reminiscent of the so-called “air curtains” (air inlets) that go together with the headlights to create a single formal entity in the Taycan. In addition to the four-point daytime running light typical of Porsche, the so-called “blasters” – long gun barrels at the front – are located at the tip.

The rear grid with the louvres and integrated third brake light was inspired by the current 911 generation, and the rear section of the starship bears the brand’s hallmark light bar.

Porsche design criteria have been applied to the interior, too: the instruments in the cockpit are clearly aligned with the driver’s axis, while the low seating position is reminiscent of the sporty ergonomics in the Porsche 918 Spyder.

All in all, the design follows a basic principle that is characteristic of the brand – all the elements on the exterior have a clear function, and purely visual features have largely been dispensed with.

“Our collaborative project with Star Wars goes perfectly with the launch of the Taycan. The design teams have brought the differing worlds of Porsche and Star Wars together to make a very special gift for the fans of the two brands,” says Kjell Gruner, Head of Marketing at Porsche.

Porsche will also be showcasing the all-new Taycan at the premiere event in Los Angeles.

 

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