Can Flower of the Holy Spirit Transform From Saint To Dove?!

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An orchid called the Flower of the Holy Spirit appears to change from a saint to a flying dove, when it blooms!

Learn more about this spectacular and divine miracle, and find out what the facts really are!

 

Flower of the Holy Spirit : From Saint To Dove!

People are sharing these photos of the Flower of the Holy Spirit, together with this helpful explanation :

This is one of the orchid species named Flower of the Holy Spirit. It starts blooming during Pentecostal period once a year.

Before bloom, it looks like praying saints, when the flower blooms, it looks like a flying dove. How amazing is God’s Creation!

Fact Check : Flower of the Holy Spirit - From Saint To Dove!

 

Flower of the Holy Spirit : It Would Be A Miracle Indeed!

It would be a miracle if either of the two pictures above are the Flower of the Holy Spirit. The sad fact is that this is yet another divinely-inspired fake story.

The only factual thing about the whole post is that they are both orchids. Everything else was made up.

Fact #1 : Neither Are The Flower of the Holy Spirit

There is an orchid called The Flower of the Holy SpiritPeristeria elata.

Also known as the Holy Ghost orchid, dove orchid, or flor del Espiritu Santo in Spanish, this is what it looks like!

Peristeria elata - real Flower of the Holy Spirit

Fact #2 : The Orchid On The Left Is Green-Yellow Catasetum

The orchid that looks like praying saints? That’s Catasetum viridiflavum, commonly known as the Green-Yellow Catasetum.

We hate to burst your divine bubble again, but generally their “arms” do not fold inwards. It’s hard to find photos that show these “saints” praying…

You have to look for the rare examples with drooping petals, and take the photos at a specific angle to make it look like a praying saint.

  • Catasetum viridiflavum orchid 01
  • Catasetum viridiflavum orchid 02

Fact #3 : The Orchid On The Right Is White Egret Flower

The orchid that looks like a flying dove is Pecteilis radiata, commonly known as the White Egret Flower, the fringed orchid or sagisō – the official flower of the Setagaya ward of Tokyo.

Not only is an egret a type of heron, not a dove… bird-like lip of this orchid droops downwards.

You need to frame the shot from underneath the orchid, at a certain angle, in order to obtain a photo that “appears” to show a flying dove.

Pecteilis radiata - White Egret flower

Fact #4 : They Do Not Bloom During Pentecost

As far as we can tell, orchids do not observe the Pentecost – which is generally around mid-May to mid-June.

  • Catasetum viridiflavum (the “praying saints”) blooms sometime between end June to end September.
  • Pecteilis radiata (the “flying dove”) blooms sometime between early December and February.

Neither of the orchids in the picture actually bloom during Pentecost…

Fact #5 : It Would Be A True Miracle If It Happens

It would be a textbook case of a true miracle if Catasetum viridiflavum blooms into Pecteilis radiata during the Pentecost, or any other time for the matter.

But it is impossible for one orchid species to change into a different orchid species, just like how it is impossible for a Chihuahua to transform into a Doberman.

We will be sure to update you if this miracle ever happens. But for now, this is just … divine inspiration?

Fact Check : Flower of the Holy Spirit - From Saint To Dove!

 

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Dr. Adrian Wong has been writing about tech and science since 1997, even publishing a book with Prentice Hall called Breaking Through The BIOS Barrier (ISBN 978-0131455368) while in medical school.

He continues to devote countless hours every day writing about tech, medicine and science, in his pursuit of facts in a post-truth world.

 

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