CPU / DRAM CLK Synch CTL – The Tech ARP BIOS Guide!

CPU / DRAM CLK Synch CTL

Common Options : Synchronous, Asynchronous, Auto

 

Quick Review of CPU / DRAM CLK Synch CTL

The CPU / DRAM CLK Synch CTL BIOS feature offers a clear-cut way of controlling the memory controller’s operating mode.

When set to Synchronous, the memory controller will set the memory clock to the same speed as the processor bus.

When set to Asynchronous, the memory controller will allow the memory clock to run at any speed.

When set to Auto, the operating mode of memory controller will depend on the memory clock you set.

It is recommended that you select the Synchronous operating mode. This generally provides the best performance, even if your memory modules are capable of higher clock speeds.

CPU / DRAM CLK Synch CTL - The Tech ARP BIOS Guide!

 

Details of CPU / DRAM CLK Synch CTL

The memory controller can operate either synchronously or asynchronously.

In the synchronous mode, the memory clock runs at the same speed as the processor bus speed.

In the asynchronous mode, the memory clock is allowed to run at a different speed than the processor bus.

While the asynchronous mode allows the memory controller to support memory modules of different clock speeds, it requires the use of FIFO (First In, First Out) buffers and resynchronizers. This increases the latency of the memory bus, and reduces performance.

Running the memory controller in synchronous mode allows the memory controller to bypass the FIFO buffers and deliver data directly to the processor bus. This reduces the latency of the memory bus and greatly improves performance.

Normally, the synchronicity of the memory controller is determined by the memory clock. If the memory clock is the same as the processor bus speed, then the memory controller is in the synchronous mode. Otherwise, it is in the asynchronous mode.

DRAM chips generic photo

The CPU / DRAM CLK Synch CTL BIOS feature, however, offers a more clear-cut way of controlling the memory controller’s operating mode.

When set to Synchronous, the memory controller will set the memory clock to the same speed as the processor bus. Even if you set the memory clock to run at a higher speed than the front side bus, the memory controller automatically selects a lower speed that matches the processor bus speed.

When set to Asynchronous, the memory controller will allow the memory clock to run at any speed. Even if you set the memory clock to run at a higher speed than the front side bus, the memory controller will not force the memory clock to match the processor bus speed.

When set to Auto, the operating mode of memory controller will depend on the memory clock you set. If you set the memory clock to run at the same speed as the processor bus, the memory controller will operate in the synchronous mode. If you set the memory clock to run at a different speed, then the memory controller will operate in the asychronous mode.

It is recommended that you select the Synchronous operating mode. This generally provides the best performance, even if your memory modules are capable of higher clock speeds.

 

Recommended Reading

Go Back To > Tech ARP BIOS GuideComputer | Home

 

Support Tech ARP!

If you like our work, you can help support our work by visiting our sponsors, participating in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donating to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!


Comments

comments

About The Author

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: