Buy the ARP T-Shirt! BIOS Optimization Guide Money Savers!
 
 20 January 2014
 N/A
  N/A
 Editorials
 Dr. Adrian Wong
 1.0
 Discuss here !
 9242
 
   
BIOS Option Of The Week - DVMT Memory Size
Since 1999, we have been developing the BIOS Optimization Guide, affectionately known... Read here
The Tech ARP 2014 Mega Giveaway Contest
We have been working hard to arrange a ton of prizes, which we will give away every w... Read here
   
Buy The BOG Book Subscribe To The BOG! Latest Money Savers!
ED#163 : How To Fix Keychain Corruption In OS X Mavericks
Digg! Reddit!Add to Reddit | Bookmark this article:

ED#163 : How To Fix Keychain Corruption In OS X Mavericks

OS X Mavericks recently went bonkers, and kept asking me to key in the keychain password from the moment I started it up. No matter how many times I key in the password, it would say that it was the wrong password (it was the correct one, you dolt!) and it kept asking me again and again and again like a really neurotic girlfriend.

I tried using resetting the password but that didn't work. It still claimed that the password was the wrong one. I tried using the Keychain First Aid to verify and repair the keychains but it only reported that everything was perfectly okay when it was obviously not. The good news is - I finally found the reason for this problem and its solution and it's stupendously simple.

Having trouble with your wireless mouse or keyboard? Blame USB 3.0!

OS X Mavericks Local Items keychain problem

  1. Open Finder and click on the Go menu. Then select Go to folder…

  1. When the Go to the folder: window pops up, type "~/Library/Keychains/" and press Go.

  1. In the Keychains folder that appears, you will find a folder with a 36 alphanumeric name like the example below - 3004A9ED-E2DE-5298-9B36-1FC95ADEFBFC. This folder contains the databases for the keychain and one or more of them are corrupted, which is why OS X keeps asking you for the password (which is never correct).

  1. All you have to do is move this folder to the Trash.

  2. Then immediately click on the Apple menu and select Restart... to restart your Mac.

After you restart your Mac, OS X will create a new folder in the Keychains folder to replace the one you just deleted. It will have a different 36 alphanumeric name, and will have new keychain databases inside. That's it!

Backdoors found in Bitlocker, FileVault and TrueCrypt?

If you like this article, please share it! ->

 

Other Scoops

If you have a scoop you want to share with us, just contact us! It doesn't have to be Apple-related. It can be anything in the tech industry, from mobile phones to P2P software. Just drop us a message!

 

Support Tech ARP!

If you like our work, you can help support out work by visiting our sponsors, participate in the Tech ARP Forums, or even donate to our fund. Any help you can render is greatly appreciated!

Support us by buying from Amazon.com!

Grab a FREE 30-day trial of Amazon Prime for free shipping, instant access to 40,000 movies and TV episodes and the Kindle Owners' Lending Library!

 

Questions & Comments

If you have a question or comment on this editorial, please feel free to post them here!

Date

Revision

Revision History

20-01-2014

1.0

Initial Release.





 
   
Bill Is Back!
Foxconn BlackOps Tech Report
Gainward BLISS 7300 GT PCX Golden Sample Graphics Card Review
ASUS Extreme N7300GS GeForce 7300 GS Graphics Card Review Rev. 1.1
NVIDIA nForce4 SLI XE and nForce4 Ultra Technology Report
Linksys WRT54G Wireless-G Broadband Router Pictorial Review
palmOne Treo 650 Launch Report
Corsair XMS4400 1GB TwinX Memory Kit Review
ASUS S-presso SFF System Review
Notebook Purchase Fiasco

 


Copyright © Tech ARP.com. All rights reserved.