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ED#163 : How To Fix Keychain Corruption In OS X Mavericks
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ED#163 : How To Fix Keychain Corruption In OS X Mavericks

OS X Mavericks recently went bonkers, and kept asking me to key in the keychain password from the moment I started it up. No matter how many times I key in the password, it would say that it was the wrong password (it was the correct one, you dolt!) and it kept asking me again and again and again like a really neurotic girlfriend.

I tried using resetting the password but that didn't work. It still claimed that the password was the wrong one. I tried using the Keychain First Aid to verify and repair the keychains but it only reported that everything was perfectly okay when it was obviously not. The good news is - I finally found the reason for this problem and its solution and it's stupendously simple.

Having trouble with your wireless mouse or keyboard? Blame USB 3.0!

OS X Mavericks Local Items keychain problem

  1. Open Finder and click on the Go menu. Then select Go to folder…

  1. When the Go to the folder: window pops up, type "~/Library/Keychains/" and press Go.

  1. In the Keychains folder that appears, you will find a folder with a 36 alphanumeric name like the example below - 3004A9ED-E2DE-5298-9B36-1FC95ADEFBFC. This folder contains the databases for the keychain and one or more of them are corrupted, which is why OS X keeps asking you for the password (which is never correct).

  1. All you have to do is move this folder to the Trash.

  2. Then immediately click on the Apple menu and select Restart... to restart your Mac.

After you restart your Mac, OS X will create a new folder in the Keychains folder to replace the one you just deleted. It will have a different 36 alphanumeric name, and will have new keychain databases inside. That's it!

Backdoors found in Bitlocker, FileVault and TrueCrypt?

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Date

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Revision History

20-01-2014

1.0

Initial Release.





 
   
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