Buy the ARP T-Shirt! BIOS Optimization Guide Money Savers!
 
 07 April 2003
 Bose
  http://www.bose.com/
 Audio
 Dr. Adrian Wong
 2.0
 Discuss here !
 73743
 
   
BIOS Option Of The Week - IDE HDD Block Mode
Since 1999, we have been developing the BIOS Optimization Guide, affectionately known... Read here
The Tech ARP 2014 Mega Giveaway Contest (Week 14)
We have been working hard to arrange a ton of prizes, which we will give away every w... Read here
   
Buy The BOG Book Subscribe To The BOG! Latest Money Savers!
Definitive Review of the Bose QuietComfort Acoustic Noise Cancelling Headset
Digg! Reddit!Add to Reddit | Bookmark this article:

Active Noise Reduction

Many people use headphones but most have never heard of active noise reduction (ANR) headphones. It isn't a recent invention, by any means. The theory behind active noise reduction was actually introduced back in 1934 when a German physicist called Paul Leug patented the idea! However, it wasn't till the late 80s when the first commercial active noise reduction headset was introduced. So, what does this active noise reduction technology really do?

To make this short and simple, ANR reduces the amount of background noise that gets to the wearer of the headset. It does this by detecting the unwanted noise and creating inverse (opposite) sound waves to cancel out the noise. So, you shouldn't hear any background noise at all!

Even if you use headphones a lot, you may not be aware of how just much background noise that's being transmitted to your ear. Often, what you are listening to is distorted or drowned out by ambient noise that gets through your headphones. Examples of such disruptive noise include air-conditioning or crying babies. So, if you want better audio clarity, you will have to increase the volume or move away from such noise sources.

Headphones using passive noise reduction methods like fully enclosing ear cups and sound absorbing materials help remove a lot of unwanted noise but they are often uncomfortable and heavy. In addition, they can't block out low frequency noise. You may think that a little noise won't hurt but noise causes fatigue and stress, especially over long periods of time.

That's why the first ANR headsets were designed for aviation use. Pilots and passengers have long endured loud engines with nothing more than passive headsets. Jet lag, caused by long flights, are often aggravated by the lack of proper noise protection.

But is active noise reduction only suitable for aviation use? Or is it only a matter of time before this technology becomes mainstream? To find out, I'll be examining as many ANR headsets I can get my hands on to find out just how well they work outside of an aircraft. Today, we will take a look at the first ANR headset to be tested at Adrian's Rojak Pot - the Bose QuietComfort Acoustic Noise Cancelling Headset!

 



 
   
ASUS P7P55D Motherboard
Western Digital 500 GB Caviar GP Hard Drive Review
Upcoming Intel Processor & Memory Technologies
Brando USB Chiller & Warmer Review
NVIDIA GeForce 7950 GX2 Technology Report
Arctic Cooling Accelero X1 Graphics Card Cooler Review
Kingston 1GB Ultra-Low Latency PC3200 HyperX Dual Channel Memory Kit Review
Launch Of The Dothan
Toshiba Satellite M30 Notebook Review
Definitive Review of the Crucial PC2100 DDR-SDRAM

 


Copyright © Tech ARP.com. All rights reserved.