Synchronous Mode Select – The BIOS Optimization Guide

Synchronous Mode Select - The BIOS Optimization Guide

Synchronous Mode Select

Common Options : Synchronous, Asynchronous

 

Quick Review

The Synchronous Mode Select BIOS feature controls the signal synchronization of the DRAM-CPU interface.

When set to Synchronous, the chipset synchronizes the signals from the DRAM controller with signals from the CPU bus (front side bus or QuickPath Interconnect). Please note that for the signals to be synchronous, the DRAM controller and the CPU bus must run at the same clock speed.

When set to Asynchronous, the chipset will decouple the DRAM controller from the CPU bus. This allows the DRAM controller and the CPU bus to run at different clock speeds.

Generally, it is advisable to use the Synchronous setting as a synchronized interface allows data transfers to occur without delay. This results in a much higher throughput between the CPU bus and the DRAM controller.

 

Details

The Synchronous Mode Select BIOS feature controls the signal synchronization of the DRAM-CPU interface.

When set to Synchronous, the chipset synchronizes the signals from the DRAM controller with signals from the CPU bus (front side bus or QuickPath Interconnect). Please note that for the signals to be synchronous, the DRAM controller and the CPU bus must run at the same clock speed.

When set to Asynchronous, the chipset will decouple the DRAM controller from the CPU bus. This allows the DRAM controller and the CPU bus to run at different clock speeds.

Generally, it is advisable to use the Synchronous setting as a synchronized interface allows data transfers to occur without delay. This results in a much higher throughput between the CPU bus and the DRAM controller.

However, the Asynchronous mode does have its uses. Users of multiplier-locked processors and slow memory modules may find that using the Asynchronous mode allows them to overclock the processor much higher without the need to buy faster memory modules.

The Asynchronous mode is also useful for those who have very fast memory modules and multiplier-locked processors with low bus speeds. Running the fast memory modules synchronously with the low CPU bus speed would force the memory modules will have to run at the same slow speed. Running asynchronously will therefore allow the memory modules to run at a much higher speed than the CPU bus.

But please note that the performance gains of running synchronously cannot be underestimated. Synchronous operations are generally much faster than asychronous operations running at a higher clock speed. It is advisable that you compare benchmark scores of your computer running asynchronously (at a higher clock speed) and synchronously to determine the best option for your system.

 

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