IDE Detect Time Out – The BIOS Optimization Guide

IDE Detect Time Out - The BIOS Optimization Guide

IDE Detect Time Out

Common Options : 0 to 15 or 0 to 30, in 1 second steps

 

Quick Review

Motherboards are capable of booting up much faster these days, with the initialization of IDE devices now take place much earlier. Unfortunately, this also means that some older IDE drives will not be able to spin up in time to be initialized! When this happens, the BIOS will not be able to detect those IDE drives and make them available to the operating system even though there’s nothing wrong with them.

This is where the IDE Detect Time Out BIOS feature comes in. It allows you to force the BIOS to delay the initialization of IDE devices for up to 30 seconds (although some BIOSes allow for even longer delays). The delay gives your IDE devices more time to spin up before the BIOS initializes them.

If you do not use old IDE drives and the BIOS has no problem initializing your IDE devices, it is recommended that you leave the delay at the default value of 0 for the shortest possible boot time. IDE devices manufactured in the last few years will have no problem spinning up in time for initialization. Only older IDE devices may have slower spin-up times.

However, if one or more of your IDE devices fail to initialize during the boot up process, start with a delay of 1 second. If that doesn’t help, gradually increase the delay until all your IDE devices initialize properly during the boot up process.

 

Details

Regardless of its shortcomings, the IDE standard is remarkably backward compatible. Every upgrade of the standard was designed to be fully compatible with older IDE devices, so you can actually use the old 40 MB hard disk drive that came with your ancient 386 system in your spanking new Intel Core i7 system! However, even backward compatibility cannot account for the slower motors used in the older drives.

Motherboards are capable of booting up much faster these days, with the initialization of IDE devices now take place much earlier. Unfortunately, this also means that some older IDE drives will not be able to spin up in time to be initialized! When this happens, the BIOS will not be able to detect those IDE drives and make them available to the operating system even though there’s nothing wrong with them.

This is where the IDE Detect Time Out BIOS feature comes in. It allows you to force the BIOS to delay the initialization of IDE devices for up to 30 seconds (although some BIOSes allow for even longer delays). The delay gives your IDE devices more time to spin up before the BIOS initializes them.

If you do not use old IDE drives and the BIOS has no problem initializing your IDE devices, it is recommended that you leave the delay at the default value of 0 for the shortest possible boot time. IDE devices manufactured in the last few years will have no problem spinning up in time for initialization. Only older IDE devices may have slower spin-up times.

However, if one or more of your IDE devices fail to initialize during the boot up process, start with a delay of 1 second. If that doesn’t help, gradually increase the delay until all your IDE devices initialize properly during the boot up process.

 

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