32 Byte Granularity – BIOS Optimization Guide

32 Byte Granularity - BIOS Optimization Guide

32 Byte Granularity

Common Options : Auto, Enabled, Disabled

 

Quick Review

The 32 Byte Granularity BIOS option determines the burst length of the DRAM controller.

When set to Enabled, the DRAM controller will read or write in bursts of 32 bytes in length.

When set to Disabled, the DRAM controller will read or write in bursts of 64 bytes in length.

When set to Auto, the DRAM controller will use a burst length of 64 bytes if the DRAM interface is 128-bits wide (dual-channel), and a burst length of 32 bytes if the DRAM interface is 64-bits wide (single-channel).

If you are using a discrete graphics card with dedicated graphics memory, you should disable this BIOS option for optimal performance. This is true whether your system is running on dual-channel memory, or single-channel memory.

It is not recommended that you leave the BIOS option at the default setting of Auto when your system is running on a single memory channel. Doing so will cause the DRAM controller to default to a burst length of 32 bytes when a burst length of 64 bytes would be faster.

If you are using your motherboard’s onboard graphics chip which shares system memory, you should enable this BIOS option, but only if your system is running on a single memory channel. If it’s running on dual-channel memory, then you must disable this BIOS option.

 

Details

The 32 Byte Granularity BIOS option determines the burst length of the DRAM controller.

When set to Enabled, the DRAM controller will read or write in bursts of 32 bytes in length.

When set to Disabled, the DRAM controller will read or write in bursts of 64 bytes in length.

When set to Auto, the DRAM controller will use a burst length of 64 bytes if the DRAM interface is 128-bits wide (dual-channel), and a burst length of 32 bytes if the DRAM interface is 64-bits wide (single-channel).

Generally, the larger burst length of 64-bytes is faster. However, a 32-byte burst length is better if the system uses an onboard graphics chip that uses system memory as framebuffer and texture memory. This is because the graphics chip would generate a lot of 32-byte system memory accesses.

Keeping that in mind, the 32-byte burst length is only supported if the DRAM interface is 64-bits wide (single-channel). If the DRAM interface is 128-bits wide, the burst length must be 64 bytes long.

If you are using a discrete graphics card with dedicated graphics memory, you should disable this BIOS option for optimal performance. This is true whether your system is running on dual-channel memory, or single-channel memory.

It is not recommended that you leave the BIOS option at the default setting of Auto when your system is running on a single memory channel. Doing so will cause the DRAM controller to default to a burst length of 32 bytes when a burst length of 64 bytes would be faster.

If you are using your motherboard’s onboard graphics chip which shares system memory, you should enable this BIOS option, but only if your system is running on a single memory channel. If it’s running on dual-channel memory, then you must disable this BIOS option.

Go Back To > The BIOS Optimization Guide | Home

 

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